Currently viewing the category: "Ground Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Shiny beetle found in my garden
Location: Galveston county, Texas
July 10, 2016 2:34 pm
I was watering my garden and this bug came out of the mud/dirt. It reminds me of a Japanese beetle and a grasshopper mixed together. I’ve seen two of the same kind of bug very close to my tomatoes and in no other part of my garden. Both times it was about mid-day (summer time) near Galveston, Tx. I just want to know what it is and if it’s bad.
Signature: All my thanks, Morgan

Pan American Big Headed Tiger Beetle Carnage

Pan American Big Headed Tiger Beetle Carnage

Dear Morgan,
Not only is it beautiful, this Tiger Beetle is a beneficial predator that will help control the number of insects in your garden naturally.  We believe we have correctly identified this beauty as a Pan American Big Headed Tiger Beetle or Carolina Metallic Tiger Beetle,
Tetracha carolina, thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Sandbanks of rivers, pastures, open, disturbed areas. Often found near water. Nocturnal, found under boards, rocks, trash, etc. during day.”  We hope you will tolerate this gorgeous predator in the future, but for now we have to tag your submission as Unnecessary Carnage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black Beetle in Texas
Location: Texas
June 17, 2016 6:35 am
I saw this beetle in April 2011 in Texas in Kickapoo State Park. It was 2-3 inches long, a big beetle.
What is it?
Signature: Joe

Fierce Ground Beetle

Fierce Ground Beetle

Dear Joe,
We were able to identify quickly this Fierce Ground Beetle in the genus
Pasimachus on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, Fierce Ground Beetles eat “caterpillars, other larval insects.”  Based on your location, we believe you have either Pasicachus californicus which according to BugGuide, their range is:  “AZ-TX-NE-UT / Mex. (does not occur in CA)” or Pasimachus depressus which according to BugGuide is “Noted from Carolinas, Oklahoma. Internet references suggest it is found west to Arizona” and described as “Large, black, elytra and pronotum often bordered with blue/violet. Elytra of male shiny, of female dull, neither have striations or punctures. Base of pronotum (next to abdomen margined). Hind tarsus long and slender.”

Thanks Daniel!
It was the biggest beetle I ever saw in the us that wasn’t in captivity.
Joe Greco

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Insect Larva
Location: Denver, Colorado
May 28, 2016 5:08 pm
Dear WTB,
While on a walk through my neighborhood in Denver, I found this black insect larva crawling around the sidewalk.
It was fairly large, I’m guessing around 1-1/2″ long, and moved at several inches per second, making taking a good photo a little tricky. This happened today, May 28th. The area is a low-density urban neighborhood with lots of yards, lawns, gardens, and trees. There are water sources in the general area, but not near where the insect was found.
I’m guessing this is some type of beetle larva, but I’ve definitely never seen this species, or one that come close to this size, before.
Signature: Duncan

Caterpillar Hunter

Caterpillar Hunter

Dear Duncan,
This is the larva of a Caterpillar Hunter, a Ground Beetle in the genus
Calosoma.  Both larvae and adults from this genus consume large numbers of caterpillars.  See this BugGuide image for comparison.  We are postdating your submission to go live to our site during our absence from the office in mid-June.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Two interesting and beautiful bugs in Alaska
Location: Near Fairbanks Alaska
June 5, 2016 5:20 pm
Hello bugperson,
In the past week I have found two beautiful insects around our home in Fairbanks Alaska. I have looked through your site and also consulted Dr. Google, but have not yet been able to figure out what they might be. The yellowish metallic beetle is on an apple leaf. It was perhaps a half inch long. The multicolored beetle was under the leaves in my flower bed as I cleaned it out to plant some flowers. It was about 3/4 of an inch long, or perhaps 5/6 of an inch… fairly large for a beetle in Alaska.
Thanks for any help you can give me.
Signature: bugalaska

Rainbow Beetle

Rainbow Beetle

Dear bugalaska,
We had to search through some unanswered mail this morning because we saw your subject line the other day, but did not have time to open your request.  We are always excited to post images from Alaska because we get so few submissions, and when those submissions are inquiring about the wonders of nature as opposed to which pest is inhabiting the house, we are even more thrilled.  We will have to split your submission into two postings because your two beetles have different family classifications.  We are starting with your gorgeous Rainbow Beetle,
Carabus vietinghoffi, a species of Ground Beetle in the Caterpillar Hunter genus and a new species for our site.  Our search for an Alaskan Ground Beetle produced a posting on Alaska Guide that identified the Rainbow Beetle with the information “They feed on caterpillars and other small insects.  In Alaska there is no record of rainbow beetle being spotted south of North Pole.”  On the Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists website, there is a report of a lecture by Dr. Henri Goulet that describes the Rainbow Beetle:  “Mind-bogglingly beautiful metallic greens, bronzes, purples and blue blacks, more emerald greens. Also turquoise wing covers trimmed with copper called ‘the best’ in Canada, Carabus vietinghoffi, from the land of small willows. It was as if a sculptor and a jewelry designer had collaborated in crafting them.”   There is a highly entertaining account in NewsMiner.com of Eleven-year-old Caleb Seekins finding a Rainbow Beetle in Fairbanks and taking it to the University of Alaska Museum of the North where entomologist Derek Sikes is quoted saying:  “‘We get a couple of these every year,’ said Sikes. ‘They usually are turned in by people just like Caleb, who find them and just think they are interesting.  It’s a pretty special deal for a couple reasons,’ he said. ‘It’s more of an attractive beetle in Alaska. We generally don’t have pretty things like that here, with lots of iridescent colors.’  He sent along a photograph of the beetle, which is a Beringian species. Commonly found in Asia, this species of beetle made it into North America when the Bering Land Bridge was in place and sea levels were low.”  Carabidae of the World lists the range as “NW, NC, E-Siberia, Far East, Sakhalin, N-Korea, NE-China; Alaska; NW, Canada.”  Thank you for submitting these wonderful images of this gorgeous Rainbow Beetle to our site.

Rainbow Beetle

Rainbow Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grandson’s bug
Location: Washington state
June 1, 2016 1:52 pm
Charlie collects bugs constantly! He wants to know this one please –
Signature: Thank you

Ground Beetle

Ground Beetle

Though we love the image you attached, we wish you had been able to provide an image that shows the dorsal surface of the beetle unobscured by fingers as that would be better for identification purposes.  We are disappointed that Insect Identification:  Insects and Other Bugs from the State of Washington does not include many Ground Beetles.  This is some species of large Ground Beetle in the family Carabidae, but we are uncertain of an exact species.  Our likeliest suspect is a Snail Eater, in the genus Scaphinotus, and according to BugGuide:  “Feed on snails, slugs. Mandibles specially adapted for insertion into opening of a snail’s shell.” 

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for the reply – I’ve never seen a child so interested in insects and spiders.  We spend a lot of time searching bug books and online sources!  Charlie is just 5 1/2 but has been doing this for a couple years.  He will be thrilled when I share your email.
Regards,
Catherine

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Should I be worried
Location: Southern Ontario
May 18, 2016 6:35 pm
Found this bettle with pincers in my house in southern Ontario today. Please help me identify.
Signature: Help pls.

Big Headed Ground Beetle

Big Headed Ground Beetle

This is a predatory Big Headed Ground Beetle in the genus Scarites, and it is perfectly harmless.  It will not hurt you or damage your home.  Your individual appears to be covered in dust as this species is generally a shiny black color.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination