Currently viewing the category: "Ground Beetles"
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Subject: Bug id
Location: Mn
January 7, 2016 5:34 pm
We found this bug today in our MN house. We have never seen this bug before and are wondering what it is.
Signature: ?

False Bombardier Beetle

False Bombardier Beetle

This is a False Bombardier Beetle in the genus Galerita, and according to bugGuide:  “Adults eat other insects, especially caterpillars.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ground beetle
Location: Bomassa, Republic of Congo
November 11, 2015 11:56 pm
I live in northern Congo and regularly come across interesting insects, some of which are probably little known or unknown to science.
I try to identify many of the arthropods I see here via iNaturalist, but many can use a lot of extra help – always appreciated!
Feel free to contact me at: naftalihonig@gmail.com
Signature: Naftali

Unknown Ground Beetle

Craspedophorus Ground Beetle

Dear Naftali,
We agree that this is a Ground Beetle in the family Carabidae, but at this time we are unable to provide you with a more specific name.  Perhaps one of our readers will provide a comment.

Via iNaturalist a good bet seems Craspedophorus sp.
There are many spp. though…

According to a published paper we found, that genus is from Australia and Asia, but in Google Books Taxonomy, Phylogeny, and Zoogeography of Beetles and Ants online, it indicates:  “The carabid genus Craspedophorus, with over a hunderd species distributed through tropical Africa, Madagascar, Asia, and Australia is notable partly because of its usual dorsal color pattern, which consists of four yellow or orange spots on a blackish elytral background.  The spots are normally at or near the lateral margins of the elytra, two on each elytron, and when they are extensive, the dark background has even been described as forming a cross.”  Colnect indicates one species is pictured on a stamp from Portuguese Guinea.  The first species pictured on Carabidae of the World , Craspedophorus abnormis, is reported from “Democratic Republic of the Congo, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, Zambia,” but alas, there is no image.  We believe you have discovered the correct genus.

No way to undercover (or name?) the species? I am just near the trinational border Cameroon-Congo-CAR…on the Congo side.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug
Location: USA Midwest
November 10, 2015 8:43 pm
My daughter (8yrs old) and I found this bug we live in the midwest near St Louis and the date is November 10th 2015 the weather has been in the mid sixties and we are just curious as to what this bug is? It is about one and a half inches long and about a half inch across any information would be appreciated.
Thanks
Signature: Darla

Big Headed Ground Beetle

Big Headed Ground Beetle

Dear Darla,
This interesting beetle is a Big Headed Ground Beetle,
Scarites subterraneus, and you can confirm our identification by matching your individual to this image from BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, they are generally found:  “Under stones, leaf litter, etc., in soil.”

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Subject: Cychrus?
Location: Studley, Virginia
October 24, 2015 2:50 pm
Hi Bugman! Seriously, I love this website!
I saw this beetle outside, and it immediately caught my eye, because it looked different than most black beetles I see.
I looked it up, and the closest I can find is that it looks like it might be in the genus Cychrus.
What do you guys think?
Love,
Signature: Allie

Small Snail Eating Beetle

Small Snail Eating Beetle

Dear Allie,
Thanks so much for your effervescent praise.  We believe you have correctly identified this Small Snail Eating Beetle to the Tribe level of Cychrini, but the genus
Cychrus, according to BugGuide, is found in the Pacific Northwest.  Based on this BugGuide image and others posted there, we believe your beetle is in the genus Sphaeroderus, and there are six species in the genus found in your area of the country, according to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tiger Beetle hunting behaviour?
Location: Short Hills Provincial Park, Thorold, Ontario
July 14, 2015 4:52 am
Hi WTB!
I thought you might like these pictures of tiger beetles I took at Short Hills Provincial Park. I like how one is a brilliant green and the other is a more sapphire colour. I noticed both beetles making a pose where they leaned back, almost as if to get a better view of their surroundings. Do you know if that’s a hunting behaviour or perhaps a reaction to my presence?
It was a very colourful day for bugs, as you can see — I was also able to see many Ebony Jewelwings, and they exhibited a similar range of colours. Some were a lighter aquamarine colour, and some, like the last picture provided, were more of an indigo colour.
Anyway, I love your site, and hope you enjoy these pictures even if you don’t post them. Thank you for the great service you provide :)
Signature: Brad

Six Spotted Tiger Beetle

Six Spotted Tiger Beetle

Dear Brad,
Your Tiger Beetle images are beautiful.  The green individual is a Six Spotted Tiger Beetle, and according to BugGuide, it is described as:  “Brilliant green coloration with six white spots distinctive. Occasional variation: bluish overall color, or spots missing.”  That could mean that both of your images are the same species.  Tiger Beetles are excellent hunters with good eyesight, and they are quite wary of people, so we are uncertain if the behavior you witnessed is typical hunting behavior or the result of sensing a large human nearby.  We will create a separate posting for your Ebony Jewelwing image.

Tiger Beetle

Tiger Beetle

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Subject: Strange Rainbow Colored Beetle
Location: Northern Indiana
June 26, 2015 8:18 am
Hello! My mother found this weird beetle trying to get in our back door this morning. I’ve never seen a bug like this, and I’m wondering what it is. Please help!
Signature: -Cecilia

Fiery Searcher

Fiery Searcher

Dear Cecilia,
This beautiful Caterpillar Hunter is known as a Fiery Searcher,
Calosoma scrutator.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination