Currently viewing the category: "Ground Beetles"
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Subject: identification
Location: Tiverton RI
April 20, 2015 6:58 pm
I have been lining in a newly purchased house since November. This is my first spring season here. This bug was in my Living room. Mid April. In Tiverton RI. I have never seen this before. I just want to know what it is. It is a high res photo so it can be blown up to see quite clearly. Thank you for your time.
Signature: Greg

False Bombardier Beetle

False Bombardier Beetle

Dear Greg,
This predatory False Bombardier Beetle is considered a beneficial insect because it will feed on other potentially problematic insects.

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Subject: Problem child
Location: Central Kalahari, Botswana
April 20, 2015 1:26 am
I am going through all the bugs that I collected during March and right now I have this little guy, who I would like to think is a species of a Bombadier beetle.
If it is possible I would love to get some help to get the species of the guy. It is a lot similar to Pheropsophus africanus, but with only two yellow/orange spots far back on elytra, which defers from P. africanus.
I hope you can help me :)
Signature: Mathias

Bombardier Beetle

Bombardier Beetle

Dear Mathias,
Your beetle looks identical to an image of a Ground Beetle from Saudi Arabia we posted  last year that we believe to be in the genus
Pherosophus, and we did link to an image of Pheropsophus africanusPerhaps one of our readers can confirm or correct that identification.

love how quick you are to reply, huge thumps up for that :)
I saw that post, while I was trying to get a name on it… The big
difference between the two is that elytra on my beetle stops right
after the two spots, where P. africanus goes further back and have a
slight yellow band on the edge of elytra.
Thank you for the help so far. I am crossing my fingers to get a species :D

I have been looking at some other beetles today, and I found this site (http://www.beetlesofafrica.com/beetle_detail.asp?beetleid=610&page=1&count=y) ,
which could be the closest we can get to an answer :)
thank you for the help :)
mvh

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Subject: strange beetle I can’t identify
Location: Missouri, United States
April 16, 2015 10:10 pm
I’ve searched and searched but I can’t seem to find a match to this beetle! I’m sure you all probably know what it is. I went out and captured one specifically for identification purposes for you, but I accidentally damaged part of the wings ;_; they’re very fast and I was using large tweezers to pick it up
Signature: Julian

False Bombardier Beetle

False Bombardier Beetle

Dear Julian,
Since this False Bombardier Beetle spends most of its life on the ground hunting for prey, the damaged elytra might not have a terribly detrimental effect on its survival.  You can read more about False Bombardier Beetles from the genus
 Galerita on BugGuide where it states:  “Adults eat other insects, especially caterpillars.”

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Subject: What is that bug?
Location: Southern Ohio
April 17, 2015 5:52 pm
My daughter found a squished bug and wants to know what it’s called.
Thank you for your time
Signature: Leah’s Mom

Squished Tiger Beetle

Squished Tiger Beetle

Dear Leah’s Mom,
Leah found a Tiger Beetle, and in our opinion, living Tiger Beetles are much more beautiful than squished ones.  Many species of Tiger Beetles have beautiful metallic elytra.  Tiger Beetles are fast running predators that can also take to the air to avoid predators.

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Subject: please help me identify this beetle
Location: Round Rock, TX
April 6, 2015 8:41 am
Goodmorning, my name is Summer and I need some help identifying this beetle that either bit or sprayed my boyfriends closed eye when he accidentally wiped his face with a towel that the bug was in. His eye has a slight blister on it, he’s feeling ok, and it burns. I live in Round Rock Texas, in a newer townhouse. Slightly rural-ish area. Thank you so much for all that you do. Have a good day;)
Signature: -Summer from Texas

Fiery Searcher

Fiery Searcher

Dear Summer,
This effective predator is a Caterpillar Hunter commonly called a Fiery Searcher,
Calosoma scrutator.  It is entirely possible that a bite might have occurred, and though the bite lacks venom, a sensitive place like the eye might cause the reaction you indicated.

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Subject: Stink Bug?
Location: Raymond, GA
March 17, 2015 11:13 am
I found this bug in the woods, and when I went to take a picture of it, it was partially obscured by leaves. I used a stick to brush the leaves away for a better view. When I did this is “popped” and released some sort of white cloud. After it did that, it scrunched up into a ball, and I was afraid I had accidentally hurt it. I used a leaf to transfer it to a piece of wood, and lo and behold, it sprang up and darted off! While I was relieved, i was wondering what caused it to make that popping noise. I thought maybe a “Stink Bug” of some sort, but couldn’t find any pictures of one that looked similar online, nor, now that I think about it, was there any unpleasant smell. I thought the red coloration was very pretty, but I’m sure other insects take it as a warning. Any idea what this little guy is?
Signature: Caleb

Update:  March 19, 2015
Hey, I sent in a letter under the title “Stink Bug?” After doing some research, I think I identified it as the Bombardier beetle (Brachinus species). However, when I looked on your site, all I could find was the False Bombardier beetle. I’m not sure if I misidentified this.

Bombardier Beetle

Bombardier Beetle

Dear Caleb,
We are so excited you wrote back to us, which prompted us to locate your original email.  This was an especially hectic week for our tiny editorial staff and we missed your original submission.  We are positively thrilled to be able to include your images of a Bombardier Beetle on our site because as you have observed, we only have images of False Bombardier Beetles, also members of the Ground Beetle family Carabidae, but in a different genus and recognizable by the black, not red head.  We are also thrilled with the written observations you provided.  The popping sound you heard is explained on BugGuide:  “Adults have chemical defenses, ejecting toxic, foul-smelling gases from their abdomen with a loud popping sound. The explosive brew is composed of hydrogen peroxide, hydroquinone, and catalytic enzymes.”
  Wired has a wonderful article on Bombardier Beetles which incudes:  “There are hundreds of species of bombardier beetles all over the world, with various defensive mechanisms. Some have non-explosive, foamy excretions of chemicals, while others like the African bombardier beetle can actually aim their explosive spray in virtually any direction like an angry lawn sprinkler.”

Bombardier Beetle

Bombardier Beetle

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination