Currently viewing the category: "Fireflies and Glowworms"
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Subject: red and black bug
Location: wi,usa
May 25, 2015 8:36 pm
Just curious what type of bug things it’s and is it dangerous?
Signature: liz

Male Glowworm

Male Glowworm

Dear Liz,
This is a male Glowworm Beetle, probably
Phengodes plumosa, and it is perfectly harmless.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Western Washington state
May 24, 2015 8:03 pm
I found this bug on the side of my house in western Washington state. It’s been relatively cool and it’s near the end of May. The red “eyes” are fascinating. Thanks for your time. Kirsten
Signature: However you’d like

Winter Dark Firefly

Winter Firefly

Dear Kirsten,
We believe we have correctly identified your beetle as a relative of the Winter Firefly,
Ellychnia corrusca, thanks to a posting on Arthur Evan’s What’s Bugging You? site where it states:  “Winter dark fireflies are mostly dull black, but the sides of their flattened, shield-like midsections are marked with yellow, orange, or reddish arched bands. Their soft, pliable wing covers are clothed in short, fine, golden hairs.  Mature larvae pupate in dead logs, especially pines. Adults emerge in late summer and fall and are sometimes encountered on trees or on the flowers of goldenrod and other asters. As temperatures begin to drop, they seek protected places under bark for the winter. The beetles reappear on late winter and early spring days, either resting on bark or circled around sap flows on maples like cattle around a trough.  Like their more familiar cousins of summer, winter black fireflies are bioluminescent, at least for a while. Both the larval and pupal stages produce their own light. Even freshly emerge adults maintain this youthful glow, but as the beetles grow older they lose their light-producing organs.”  Since that is a mostly eastern species, we believe your individual is a member of the same genus.  A related species in the genus is Ellychnia facula, which according to BugGuide is found in the:  “Rocky Mountains from southeast British Columbia to Idaho.”  Your individual might also be Ellychnia greeni, which according to BugGuide is:  “Found along the west coast from southern British Columbia to northern California.”

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Subject: pink glow worm?
Location: northern california
May 16, 2015 10:11 pm
Please see my pic for both a photo and a description of the find. This happened May 14th in a rural area outside of Santa Rosa, CA. Oak woodlands. Is it a pink glow worm, adult female? Thanks!
Signature: Tony

Pink Glowworm

Pink Glowworm

Dear Tony,
Thanks so much for sending us your account of a female Pink Glowworm, Microphotus angustus, sighting.

Description of Pink Glowworm Sighting

Description of Pink Glowworm Sighting

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Subject: Pink Glow Work
Location: Lake Lopez, California
May 11, 2015 1:34 pm
We found this worm at Lake Lopez this weekend on an Oak Tree. Very fascinating!
Signature: DiAnn

Pink Glowworm

Female Pink Glowworm

Dear DiAnn,
We believe your female Pink Glowworm (actually a Firefly) is
Microphotus angustus, which is pictured on BugGuide, though there is a dearth of information on the site.  Luckily our favorite text for local species in our area, The Insects of the Los Angeles Basin by Charles L. Hogue, provides a wealth of information:  “the female of the Pink glowworm (which is 1/2 in.,or 13 mm, long) communicates her location to the male (1/4 in., or 6 mm, long) by emitting a continuous uniform luminescent glow.  The adult male has the usual firefly beetle form, but the female is ‘larviform’ (wingless and elongate like the larva …).  The males are not seen as often as the females because they give light only when disturbed, and the light is weak and not used in communication.  The female is fairly common in late spring to early summer in the foothill canyons  … .  Found at night by its glow and in the daytime under stones lying on the leaf mold in grassy areas, the adult Pink Glowworm is easily recognized by the pink color of the flattened segments;  the terminal segments are yellowish.  The segments of the larvae of both male and female are blackish with pink margins.”  We are very excited to include and to feature your Pink Glowworm documentation.

Christina Sargent, Melissa Dilts, Dawn Virginia Shilling, Alfonso Moreno, Rachel Carpenter, Andrea Leonard Drummond, All the Dirt on Gardening - Muskogee OK, Jacob Helton, Leslie Gist, Kitty Heidih liked this post
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Subject: Glowworm Colorado
Location: Grand Junction, Colorado
April 20, 2015 8:20 pm
Hi! I just moved to Grand Junction, CO. We were enjoying a BBQ and noticed our neighbor’s tree is glowing. I am going to head over there tomorrow to see if I can find the cause.
Signature: Kat

Glowing Glowworms or Christmas Tree Lights???

Glowing Glowworms or Christmas Tree Lights???

Dear Kat,
We can’t help but to wonder if recent changes in the status of controlled substances in Colorado have in any way affected your perception of reality and the world around you.  Have you entertained that these might be Christmas Tree lights and not glowing Glowworms?

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Subject: Beautiful Centepede/Millipede
Location: Jordan Lake/ Chapel Hill, NC
April 18, 2015 9:29 pm
Tonight I came across this photo from a couple of years ago. At the start of fall, I pulled a blanket out of a plastic storage container. When I opened it up this bug fell out. It was about 5 inches long. It’s beautiful but I didn’t dare touch it! I grabbed a container from the trash and scooped up the bug, took a quick pic and tossed it outside. I’ve been wondering what it was ever since!
Signature: Frightened of Beauty

Railroad Worm

Railroad Worm

Dear Frightened of Beauty,
This is a Railroad Worm, the larva of a Glowworm Beetle in the family Phengodidae and probably in the genus
Phengodes because of its similarity to this image posted on BugGuide.  As the name indicates, these larvae are bioluminescent, and had you had the opportunity to view this Railroad Worm in the dark, you would have been treated to a light show.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination