Currently viewing the category: "Feather Horned and Cedar Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fuzzy antenna beetle
Location: Lorain, Ohio
September 23, 2014 12:34 pm
I found this beetle flying around my porch. There was another one (I’m guessing female, due to its lack of fan-like antenna) sitting on the side of my house.
The back of their abdomen is orange.
It is currently early autumn.
Signature: Candice

Male Cedar Beetle

Male Cedar Beetle

Dear Candice,
We are very excited about your submission.  WE believe you have documented images of both a male and female Cedar Beetle,
Sandalus niger, an identification we verified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, they are found “Mostly: Sept-Oct” and “Larvae probably feed on Cycada nymphs. Adults very short lived.”

Female Cedar Beetle

Female Cedar Beetle

Female Cedar Beetle

Female Cedar Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Feather Horned Beetle
Location: Phillip Island, Victoria, Australia
March 23, 2014 12:03 am
Hey Bugman,
Came across a Feather Horned Beetle today on a walk around Berry’s Beach and Pyramid Rock on Phillip Island Victoria, Australia. Your site allowed me to determine what it was, and noticed you didn’t have many photos so here’s one for your collection :)
Cheers,
Signature: Lauren

Feather Horned Beetle

Feather Horned Beetle

Dear Lauren,
Your Feather Horned Beetle,
Rhipicera femoralis, is a wonderful addition to our archives.  Thank you so much for sending in a photo of a magnificent species that you had already self-identified.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: beetle with orange ”antlers” – central Ohio
Location: north central Ohio
September 14, 2013 7:08 pm
A friend saw this beetle on his screen door tonight. He said it was about an inch long. I thought maybe it was a variegated June beetle, but it has pincers and it looks like it’s shiny. This was seen in north central Ohio.
Signature: Sharon G

Cedar Beetle

Cedar Beetle

September 15, 2013 5:56 AM
I finally found it: identified it as a male Sandalus niger. Thanks!

Hi Sharon,
We are happy to learn you have identified your male Cedar Beetle,
Sandalus niger.  The Cicada Parasite Beetles resemble Scarab Beetles, but they diverge at the suborder level of taxonomy.  This is not a commonly reported species to our site, so we are very happy to have a new photograph.  We originally posted an image of a Cedar Beetle two years ago and that was the first representative on our site, and it was also from central Ohio.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae probably feed on Cycada nymphs. Adults very short lived.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identify our cute insect
Location: Perth, Western Australia
May 12, 2013 8:19 pm
We found this little guy yesterday sitting on our car and have never seen anything like it! Other internet sites haven’t been very helpful in identification. His antennae are also quite odd they look a little like false eyelashes? Can you identify him for us?
Signature: Jemma, Australia

Feather Horned Beetle

Feather Horned Beetle

Dear Jemma,
These are by far the best images we have ever received of a Feather Horned Beetle,
Rhipicera femoralis.  These really are amazing looking beetles.  We have not had much luck finding information on this distinctive beetle, but Pinterest states:  “The antennae of males are unusual in that they have more than 20 segments and arise from small knob-like prominences.”  Chris Mallory has a marvelous photo posted of this species.  So, while there are photos of this species available online, credible information is noticeably lacking.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to point us to a website with relevant information on the Feather Horned Beetle.

Feather Horned Beetle

Feather Horned Beetle

Feather Horned Beetle

Feather Horned Beetle

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: cockroach or beetle?
Location: MALAYSIA
February 27, 2013 11:54 pm
Hello there bugman. I was wondering what kind of bug is this? It can even fly around and it has the eyebrow looking stuff i mean eyelashes .. Tried google it but doesnt have anything returned
This is the picture i have uploaded hopefully i will get to know this more. Thanks
Signature: BRANDON

Beetle with Plumose Antennae

Beetle with Plumose Antennae

Dear Brandon,
The entomological term to describe this beetle’s antennae is plumose and you can see examples of plumose antennae on BugGuide.  In form, your beetle resembles a Click Beetle in the family Elateridae, and there are Click Beetles with plumose antennae, but we suspect that this might be a member of a smaller and more obscure family of beetles that is contained within the superfamily Elateroidea.  We decided to search our own archives and we found that a very similar beetle was our 10,000th posting and it was tentatively identified as
Callirhipis cardwellensis.  Not long after that, we posted an individual, also from Malaysia, that looks identical to your beetle.  If your beetle is Callirhipis cardwellensis, then it belongs in the family Callirhipidae, as evidenced by these specimen tags on the Victoria Museum website.  According to BugGuide, the family Callirhipidae contains Callirhipid Cedar Beetles.  We are certain that your networking cache will spike as soon as you are able to post the identity of this unusual beetle.

Possibly Callirhipis cardwellensis

Possibly Callirhipis cardwellensis

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black beetle with feathery antenae
Location: Akron, Ohio (city sidewalk)
December 12, 2012 9:49 pm
Love this site! Any chance you can tell me what genus/species of beetle is this?
My girlfriend and I were taking a walk this fall in NE Ohio (USA) when I spotted this beetle on the sidewalk, exhibiting some odd behavior. It did not seem to be bothered by us and continued to walk around, with its wings spread. This made it easy to photograph, but since all I had was my phone, this is the best I could get.
Signature: Bearlo

Cedar Beetle

Hi Bearlo,
We have not had any luck with a conclusive identity in our initial web search, but our best guess at the moment is that this is some member of the superfamily Elateroidea.  You can browse the possibilities on Bugguide.  We have requested some assistance from Eric Eaton and we hope to hear back from him shortly.

Thanks for the quick response. I’ll search on the Superfamily Elateroidea and check out Bugguide. Have a great weekend and a wonderful holiday.

Eric Eaton identifies the Cedar Beetle
Daniel:
They changed the format on Yahoo!Mail again.  Took me a minute to find the “reply” icon!
Yes, this is a male Sandalus niger, the “Cedar Beetle,” in the cicada parasite family Rhipiceridae:
http://bugguide.net/node/view/148447
Neat find, though they are quite common.  Where you find one there is usually more.
Eric

Thanks for the assistance Eric.  I contemplated the Cicada Parasite Beetle or Feather Horned Beetle family, but didn’t scrutinize the possibilities too closely.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination