Currently viewing the category: "Darkling and Ironclad Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pie dish bugs?
Location: north west sydney, Australia.
April 6, 2016 4:07 am
We have been finding many of these in and around my home. Tonight this little guy was in my daughter’s bed. Are they pie dish bugs? And are they harmless?
Signature: Eddie.

PIe Dish Beetle

PIe Dish Beetle

Dear Eddie,
We agree that this is a Pie Dish Beetle in the genus
Pterohelaeus based on images posted to the Brisbane Insect site.  According to the Australian Museum:  “Adult pie-dish beetles forage on the ground at night, moving around quite quickly on long legs. Some species return to the same resting-place at dawn, often using mammal (mainly rabbit) burrows to shelter in. Other species are commonly found under pieces of wood, leaf litter, logs or stones. Some species in the genus Pterohelaeus are found under the loose bark of living and dead trees such as Eucalyptus. The adults are most active during the hottest months of the year. ”  Pie Dish Beetles do not pose a threat to humans.

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Subject: Please help me name this beetle
Location: Sydney Australia
February 19, 2016 5:37 am
This beetle flew through my bedroom window at night.
Kind of heavy, strong grasp, black with interesting pattern – yet flat border around its oval body.
Stayed for awhile, and flew away again..
I’m just very interested in knowing.
Signature: Tyler leigh

Pie Dish Beetle

Pie Dish Beetle

Dear Tyler,
This is one of the Pie Dish Beetles, an unusual group of genera belonging to the Darkling Beetle family Tenebrionidae.  According to Australian Museum:  “The pie-dish beetles’ common name refers to their general pie-dish shape and broad body flanges (rims) around the edges of their thickened, hardened, fore wings (elytra) and the front part of the thorax or second body segment (prothorax). These flanges can often be quite large.”  The site also states:  “Adult pie-dish beetles forage on the ground at night, moving around quite quickly on long legs. Some species return to the same resting-place at dawn, often using mammal (mainly rabbit) burrows to shelter in. Other species are commonly found under pieces of wood, leaf litter, logs or stones. Some species in the genus Pterohelaeus are found under the loose bark of living and dead trees such as Eucalyptus. The adults are most active during the hottest months of the year.  The pie-dish beetles’ flattened body form with expanded flanges may have been an evolutionary adaptation for living for living under the loose bark of Eucalyptus. In the more recently evolved species, the flanges are even more exaggerated, serving to deter predators and possibly to play a minor role in water collection.”  More images can be found on Brisbane Insects.

Pie Dish Beetle

Pie Dish Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery beetle
Location: Chinguetti, Mauritania
January 21, 2016 11:04 am
I wrote 11/19/2015 and at that time only had a photo of the beetle on its back. It appears early in the morning when it’s still cool. It is 4cm long. In winter It appears all day long.
The manuscript librarian said there is another species in the evening that looks like this one but with grey spots on its back. It only appears at night. It walks on the walls and makes holes to sleep inside.
Neither bug eats manuscripts but we are curious as to what it is? Please help.
Thanks,
Signature: Michaelle Biddle

Darkling Beetle

Darkling Beetle

Dear Michaelle,
Our hunch is that this is a Darkling Beetle in the family Tenebrionidae, but we do not have time to research a more specific identity this evening.  Your beetle does remind us of the Stink Beetles in the genus
Eleodes that we have in the Los Angeles area and desert climates in the Southwest U.S.

Darkling Beetle

Darkling Beetle

Dear Daniel –
Thanks for the information.  I notice the picture is already up on your pages.
Best,
Michaelle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug
Location: Kwazulu Natal South Africa
December 9, 2015 7:49 am
Hi
Please can you identify the attached bug
Signature: Greg Griffith

Darkling or Ironclad Beetle

Darkling or Ironclad Beetle

Dear Greg,
We haven’t the time to do the research at this moment, but this is either a Darkling Beetle in the family Tenebrionidae or an Ironclad Beetle in the family Zopheridae.  We will do additional research later today.

Update:  December 10, 2015
We believe we found this matching image on iSpot that is identified as a Darkling Beetle, and there is a really robust comment on the differences between Ironclad Beetles and Darkling Beetles that ends with this conclusion:  “I think the teneb in this observation belongs to the tribe Asidini of the subfamily Pimeliinae, but I don’t know the tenebs well at all.”

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Subject: 3 Namibian Insects
Location: Namibia
November 18, 2015 9:44 am
But of course Daniel.
The small beetle-like insect was walking on the sandy-dusty ground of the Anderson Campsite at Waterberg/Namibia. The ground colour was black and the body was all covered with sand. My idea is, that this “shabby” appearance is perhaps a way to camouflage itself.
After the research I did today, I now think it could be a Mouldy Beetle (Eurychora sp). In the video I made, it sure looks like it. I´ve put my video (20.6 MB) and a pic from the web on my google-drive-account, you can watch it in the link if you like:
https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B5DefwrewQJrd0E2Q3RuQWIzb0U&usp=sharing
That´s all I know until now to image 3, hope it helps.
Thanks again,
bye, Becky, Munich-Germany

Camouflaged Insect

Camouflaged Insect

Thanks for the additional information Becky.  The segmented antennae are a very good indication this is a beetle.  At first glance we thought it was a True Bug, but the antennae structure overrules that.  We found some images of Mouldy Beetles on Margy Green Coleoptera and we believe you have correctly identified this critter.  Images on iSpot and  Africa Wild are also a very good visual match to your image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification please
Location: https://www.google.ca/maps/place/Mandeville,+QC+J0K/@46.4093252,-73.355562,11z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x4cc61a68badd6b59:0x27b7c7ab189a85cd?hl=fr
June 1, 2015 6:33 pm
Hi,
Found this bug in a forest in Quebec (Canada). The city is called Mandeville. It was near a waterfall.
Can you identify it?
Thanks
Signature: Steve Morissette

Eastern Ironclad Beetle

Eastern Ironclad Beetle

Dear Steve,
Thanks to its resemblance to our familiar western Diabolical Ironclad Beetle, we quickly identified your Eastern Ironclad Beetle,
Phellopsis obcordata, thanks to images posted on Bugguide where it states they are found:  “under bark of decaying hardwoods & conifers in association with polypore fungi (Piptoporus, Fomes) in dense boreal forests and at high elevation in Appalachian Mts; larvae feed inside fungi.”

Eastern Ironclad Beetle

Eastern Ironclad Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination