Currently viewing the category: "Darkling and Ironclad Beetles"
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Subject: help identifying beetle?
Location: Oregon
March 26, 2015 2:18 pm
Hello! While backpacking at Cottonwood Canyon State Park in N/Central Oregon (E of the Cascades) this past weekend I found this beetle. Saw at least three of them. It is a sandy/dry location, lots of sagebrush.
Perhaps in the Carabidae (ground beetle) family? The gold accents really stand out. No one seems to know what it is and Google is failing me! Hoping you can assist. Thanks!
Signature: Audrey Addison

Possibly Darkling Beetle

Dune Beetle

Dear Audrey,
We are certain that this is not a Ground Beetle, but we are not certain of its exact identity.  We believe it is most likely a Darkling Beetle in the family Tenebrionidae or a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae, but alas, we are in a rush this morning and we don’t have time to research its exact identity.  We are posting your image and perhaps one of our readers will write in with an identity.  If not, we will continue the research tomorrow.

Eric Eaton confirms Darkling Beetle
Hi, Daniel:
It is a darkling beetle called a “dune beetle,” in the genus Coelus.  Never saw one of these when I lived out there.  Neat find!
Eric

Thanks Eric,
We are linking to the BugGuide page on the genus.  Checking out the comments, we do believe it appears more like a member of the genus
Eusattus, and in our opinion, based on images posted to BugGuide, it looks closest to Eusattus muricatus, a species with a much greater range than other members of the genus.

Eric Eaton responds
Well, shoot, I don’t know.  I never saw Eusattus out there, either, though in Arizona and here in Colorado, Eusattus is most definitely most abundant in the *fall*, not the spring.
Eric

Awesome!! I struggled trying to find any information on this beetle! Thank you for your help!!
Audrey

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Coleoptera in Namibia
Location: Namibia
February 1, 2015 4:11 am
This insect was in the namib desert in Namibia :
https://goo.gl/maps/2OQMc
Would it be called the tok tokkie beetle ? What is the scientific name ?
Signature:  A Traveler

Tok-Tokkie

Tok-Tokkie

Dear A Traveler,
According to Beetles in the Bush:  “‘Tok-tokkie’ refers not to a particular genus or tribe of tenebrionids, but rather a number of flightless species that have developed a unique “tapping” method of communication between males and females.  The name “tok-tokkie” is onomatopoeic, referring to the sound these beetles make when they tap their abdomen on the ground.  In the same way that fireflies have species-specific patterns of flashes, different species of tok-tokkies tap with differing frequencies.  The beetle makes the noise by raising its abdomen and then bringing it down on the surface of the ground several times in quick succession.  Males initiate the tapping and await a response from a receptive female.  Signals are exchanged back and forth until, eventually, the two locate each other and mate.  Females lay eggs in shallow excavations in the dry, sandy soil, and the larvae that hatch feed within the soil on the roots of small plants.”
  Your individual is a Darkling Beetle in the family Tenebrionidae, so the name Tok-Tokkie is appropriate.  We cannot say for certain the exact species.

Two other images you submitted are also flightless Tenebrionids, so they can also be called Tok-Tokkies.

Tok-Tokkie

Tok-Tokkie

Subject: Coleoptera in Namibia
Location: Namibia
February 1, 2015 4:14 am
This insect was in the namib desert in Namibia :
https://goo.gl/maps/2OQMc
Thanks for your research !

Tok-Tokkie

Tok-Tokkie

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Subject: Black And White Beetle?
Location: Bulverde, Texas
October 6, 2014 5:19 pm
What’s that bug,
I found this little guy crawling up the outside wall of my house in Bulverde, Texas in early October. He was about 1-2 inches long, six legs, black and white pattern on his body. I was just wondering what he might be and thought these photos might be helpful to you.
Thanks!
Signature: Kelsey

Ironclad Beetle

Ironclad Beetle

Dear Kelsey,
This Ironclad Beetle,
 Zopherus nodulosus, gets its common name because of its extremely hard, nearly impenetrable exoskeleton.

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Subject: black beetle
Location: stanford university hills, northern california
March 24, 2014 4:53 pm
it bugs me that i do not know the identity of this common bug
BTW – it likes mushrooms
Thanks
Signature: virusmanbob

Desert Stink Beetle

Desert Stink Beetle

Dear virusmanbob,
This is a Desert Stink Beetle in the genus
Eleodes.  They are sometimes called Acrobat Beetles because of the way they position themselves when threatened, with head lowered and rear end up in the air.  You can view additional images on BugGuide.

Dear Daniel –
This is awesome!  Thank you so much!
This is my first query to whatsthatbug and it works!
On my website, I posted your reply with attribution and a link to whatsthatbug:
http://www.stanford.edu/~siegelr/insects/eleodes.html
I am a frequent mushroom observer user and I am hooked on that as well.
Best, Bob

Why is that Desert Stink Beetle clinging to a twig?

Why is that Desert Stink Beetle clinging to a twig?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unkown bug
Location: Brigadoon Western Australia Perth
December 10, 2013 7:02 am
Hi,
I don’t know much about entoemology and generally find the answers to my questions of what’s that bug from my family and friends. This time however I’ve not managed to find an answer and google hasn’t yielded any results. I would very much like to know what this is so I can stop traipsing the internet for an answer.
Signature: thankyo uvery much Chez

Hairy Backed Pie Dish Beetle

Hairy Backed Pie Dish Beetle

Hi Chez,
Many years ago, we received a similar image that we identified as a Pie Dish Beetle, but it took us five more years to identify it to the species level.  We believe you have submitted an image of a Hairy Backed Pie Dish Beetle,
Helea perforata.

Hairy Backed Pie Dish Beetle

Hairy Backed Pie Dish Beetle

There are many more images online now than there were when we first were asked to identify this unusual Darkling Beetle, and now you can find great images on Friends of Queens Park Bushland where it states:  “Pie-dish beetles feed on dead and decaying plant material.  Pie-dish beetles lay their eggs in moist soil during summer and autumn, usually under clumps of rotting plant material, under which adults often shelter. Females of some species can lay up to 1,000 eggs during their life spans. The rate of egg production appears to be related to temperature. So is the time of hatching, which ranges from seven to fourteen days after the eggs were laid.
After hatching, the larvae can be found in loose clusters on the top of moist soil, dispersing as they develop. When fully grown, they burrow deeper into wetter soil where they build a circular pupal chamber and change into pupae. One to three weeks later, the adults emerge. At first they are soft and light brown, but they harden after about a week and the body becomes dark brown or black, the colour depending on the species. Soon after emergence, mating occurs and eggs develop three or four weeks later. Adult pie-dish beetles can be relatively long-lived (up to a year).”  Esperance Blog has an image of a mating pair of Hairy Backed Pie Dish Beetles.  Your comprehensive views of the individual you encountered are an excellent addition to our photo archive.

Hairy Backed Pie Dish Beetle

Hairy Backed Pie Dish Beetle

Yay!,
Thats an awesome name for a beetle and makes sense, we’ve recently built a compost bin by the house for our food scraps so I look forward to seeing more of these curious creatures wandering around the general area.
Thankyou very much
Chez

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of beetle is this?
Location: Second growth hardwood forest, Cortland, N.Y.
December 2, 2013 10:31 am
Durning a wind storm the top of a big black cherry tree splintered and fell down. The center of the tree was mostly hollow. When cutting up the tree for fire wood this beetle was found. There were more beetles and tunnels through the rotten wood. Are they opportunistic or did they cause the death of the tree? Do I have to worry about them attacking my house?
Thanks!
Signature: M. Fortin

we cannot view your attachment.  Please resend and attach a photo or jpg.

Sorry-I don’t know how to attach a photo from iPhoto so I just copied it to this e-mail.
I live in the Finger Lakes area of New York state.  A black cherry tree on my property splintered about 20 feet up the trunk and fell over in a high wind.  The inside of the trunk was totally rotten with tunnels through the soft bits.
There were beetles in the tunnels.  They were approx. 1/4 inch long.  Did they cause the death of the tree or were they just opportunistically feeding on the dead wood?  Should I be concerned about them destroying my house?
Thanks for your time.
M. Fortin

Beetle

Darkling Beetle

Dear M. Fortin,
We managed to view and convert your attachment into a jpg.  This appears to be a type of Darkling Beetle.  We do not believe you need to worry about them infesting your home.  We are going to request a more knowledgeable opinion on this matter.

Eric Eaton  confirms.
You are absolutely right, it is some kind of darkling beetle, on the order of a mealworm.  No threat to structures at all.  It is likely scavenging the dead wood, eating fungus, or something else related to the rotting wood.
Eric

You are so kind!
Thank you for taking the time!
Were you able to see the picture I sent on your last e-mail?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination