Currently viewing the category: "Darkling and Ironclad Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Namibian Beetle
Location: Namibia, Africa
November 1, 2016 7:16 am
Hello! I found this insect crawling on a petrified sand dune in Spitzkoppe, Namibia last April. I am having a very hard time identifying it. Thank you for your help!
Signature: Josh

Darkling Beetle, we believe

Darkling Beetle, we believe

Dear Josh,
We suspect that this is a Darkling Beetle in the family Tenebrionidae, but though we have located several black and white striped African species online, nothing quite matches your lovely individual.  We couldn’t even locate a match on the Beetles of Africa site.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck.

Identification:  Cesar Crash provided us with this link to Margy Green Photo Design of Trachynotus sp. (Tenebrionidae) that sure looks similar.  This genus is not well represented on the internet and we did find a removed Ebay posting of a specimen for sale that was listed as “extremely rare.”

Hi Daniel,
Thank you so much for your response.  I’m glad to have some further clarification as to its identity.
Thanks again!
Josh

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Iron Clad Beetle?
Location: Angeles National Forest
June 26, 2016 1:25 am
Dear Bugman,
I found this guy at Wildwood picnic area in Angeles National Forest, located just north of Sunland, CA. I was wondering if I have correctly identified this insect as an “Iron Clad Beetle.” This bug had a pecular way of playing dead when I picked it up and gently placed it on my notebook for a better shot.
Signature: Jessica Chortkoff

Ironclad Beetle

Ironclad Beetle

Dear Jessica,
We agree that you have properly identified your Ironclad Beetle.  Because we wanted to be able to provide as much detail in the insect in the posting, we were forced to crop the image, meaning your name has been cropped out. 

Dear Bugman (Professor Marlos),
Feel free to crop my photos as needed. I put my name on them so nobody on facebook can steal them and use them as their own. I hope all is well at LACC. I had a really rough year and am spending my time working on a film about Angeles Forest. As I catalog the various insects I find there I plan to share some more photos soon, but will try to not overwhelm your site with too many at a time. -Jessica

Hi Jessica,
We didn’t realize that was you writing.  The different surname through us.  Good luck with your film and we hope things get better for you.  The award winning Collegian Times Magazine did quite well this past year thanks to your contributions.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown Beetle in Mexico
Location: Lake Chapala, Mexico
May 21, 2016 9:43 pm
This past year I moved from Albuquerque NM to the area just south of Guadalajara, Mexico so everything here is new to me. Right now the Mexican “Rain-Birds,” a Mexican version of the cicada are singing loudly in search of mates.
On a different subject though, I keep seeing these beetles on the side of the house. They seem remarkably placid, never moving around, sometimes staying in the same place for 3 days. They are beautifully ornamented.
I don’t see them eat anything (nor are they pursued). They don’t seem to be looking for mates. They have been around since early April.
Signature: Ken

Ironclad Beetle

Ironclad Beetle

Dear Ken,
This distinctive beetle is an Ironclad Beetle,
Zopherus nodulosus, and it is a species well represented in our archives because the species is also found in Texas.  According to BugGuide, the range is:  “s. TX to Mexico.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle
Location: Sun Valley, CA
May 17, 2016 7:24 pm
Started seeing a lot of these guys walking around.
Signature: Don’t care

Desert Stink Beetle

Desert Stink Beetle

This is a Desert Stink Beetle or Acrobat Beetle, a group of distinctive black Darkling Beetles that often stand still with the tip of the abdomen pointed up while expelling a foul odor, a survival strategy that explains both common names.  BugGuide also indicates Circus Beetle is name that describes the entire genus.  Your individual has a set of characteristics:  smooth elytra, pointed abdomen tip and broad pronotum, that is quite distinctive.  The closest match we could find on BugGuide is  Eleodes acuticaudus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pie dish bugs?
Location: north west sydney, Australia.
April 6, 2016 4:07 am
We have been finding many of these in and around my home. Tonight this little guy was in my daughter’s bed. Are they pie dish bugs? And are they harmless?
Signature: Eddie.

PIe Dish Beetle

PIe Dish Beetle

Dear Eddie,
We agree that this is a Pie Dish Beetle in the genus
Pterohelaeus based on images posted to the Brisbane Insect site.  According to the Australian Museum:  “Adult pie-dish beetles forage on the ground at night, moving around quite quickly on long legs. Some species return to the same resting-place at dawn, often using mammal (mainly rabbit) burrows to shelter in. Other species are commonly found under pieces of wood, leaf litter, logs or stones. Some species in the genus Pterohelaeus are found under the loose bark of living and dead trees such as Eucalyptus. The adults are most active during the hottest months of the year. ”  Pie Dish Beetles do not pose a threat to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please help me name this beetle
Location: Sydney Australia
February 19, 2016 5:37 am
This beetle flew through my bedroom window at night.
Kind of heavy, strong grasp, black with interesting pattern – yet flat border around its oval body.
Stayed for awhile, and flew away again..
I’m just very interested in knowing.
Signature: Tyler leigh

Pie Dish Beetle

Pie Dish Beetle

Dear Tyler,
This is one of the Pie Dish Beetles, an unusual group of genera belonging to the Darkling Beetle family Tenebrionidae.  According to Australian Museum:  “The pie-dish beetles’ common name refers to their general pie-dish shape and broad body flanges (rims) around the edges of their thickened, hardened, fore wings (elytra) and the front part of the thorax or second body segment (prothorax). These flanges can often be quite large.”  The site also states:  “Adult pie-dish beetles forage on the ground at night, moving around quite quickly on long legs. Some species return to the same resting-place at dawn, often using mammal (mainly rabbit) burrows to shelter in. Other species are commonly found under pieces of wood, leaf litter, logs or stones. Some species in the genus Pterohelaeus are found under the loose bark of living and dead trees such as Eucalyptus. The adults are most active during the hottest months of the year.  The pie-dish beetles’ flattened body form with expanded flanges may have been an evolutionary adaptation for living for living under the loose bark of Eucalyptus. In the more recently evolved species, the flanges are even more exaggerated, serving to deter predators and possibly to play a minor role in water collection.”  More images can be found on Brisbane Insects.

Pie Dish Beetle

Pie Dish Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination