Currently viewing the category: "Click Beetles"
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Subject: beautiful clicking beetle in wv
Location: charleston West Virginia
May 20, 2012 8:17 pm
Hey thank you for this website it helped me id this insect I found in my bathroom. Actually my wife found it an she freaked. But thanks again bugman.
Signature: friendly bug enthusiasts

Eyed Elater

Dear friendly bug enthusiasts,
We are happy our website enabled you to identify your Eyed Elater, a large Click Beetle.    When it find find itself on its backs, it is able to snap its body in a manner as to propel the beetle into the air, flipping itself to land on its feet.

Eyed Elater


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Amazing bug in my yard, what is it?
Location: Baltimore, MD
May 17, 2012 5:31 pm
I’ve never seen anything like this. What an amazing creature! I think the big spots are on the tail, not sure. I’d love to know the name so I can research it.
Thank you!
Signature: doesn’t matter

Eyed Elater

Dear doesn’t matter,
This is an Eyed Elater, the largest North American Click Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Beetle with antler-like antennae
Location: Japan, Mie (Central Japan, south of Nagoya, near coast)
May 5, 2012 6:20 pm
This beetle I photographed in Japan in 2005 (was it really so long ago?!), shortly after dusk on the 4th of May.
My best guess is Pyrochroidae, others on the interwebs have suggested Eucnemidae Melasidae or Elateridae.
Are the ”antlers” for detecting scents/pheromones, or to they have another purpose.
All the best
Signature: James Kilfiger

Click Beetle

Hi James,
Because of the antennae, your guess of family Pyrchroidae, the Fire Colored Beetles, was a good, though wrong guess.  Not many Click Beetles in the family Elateridae have such pectinate antennae, but there are some species.  Interestingly, we very quickly found a match to your Click Beetle on Natural Japan where it is identified as
Pectocera fortunei = hige-kometsuki.  Natural Japan provides this information: “Lots of these click beetles were flying around one particular tree (I’m sorry I didn’t identify the tree!). They are pretty big and their method of flying is quite ungainly, elytra out to the sides and abdomens hanging down, making them look like flying crucifixes. They were very active and wouldn’t keep still to be photographed but I managed to catch one in my hat. I put it on a leaf and it immediately took off again! By the way, the male uses its huge feathery antennae for detecting females.”  Here are photos of a male and female on a Japanese website.

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Firefly
Location: Key West, Florida
April 30, 2012 9:19 pm
Hi,
Tonight I saw a one inch long dark colored beetle that had two bioluminescent spots on the top of the carapace (not underneath like a regular firely). It emitted a bright green glow from each of these spots. I saw it flying and then it landed. I ran to get a camera, but it flew away. I have never seen a firefly in Key West.
Signature: Alison

Drawing of a Glowing Click Beetle

Hi Alison,
We suspect you encountered a Glowing Click Beetle in the genus
Deilelater.  Here is the BugGuide information page for your reference.

Sweet, yes it was!!!
I have never seen one before, it was very cool.
THANKS for your reply.
Alison

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Eyed Click Beetle
Location: Burbs just north of Hotlanta
April 9, 2012 11:41 am
Greetings bugman!
Sunday afternoon I was sitting in my front yard and watched this large flying insect make his approach. It flew in a slow lazy way and wasn’t quite parallel to the ground but a bit tilted. I was already curious. Then when it landed on my painting drop cloth I had to check it out with my camera phone. I was expecting a dragonfly or cicada killer wasp. I was not expecting these large eyes. The beetle was a very patient model even allowing me to fetch a quarter and place it alongside for scale. After I took the photos a google search seemed to identify this beetle as an Eyed Click Beetle. I think I saw it listed here as an Eyed Elater the elater was an important part of the name. I do wish I’d discovered its identity before it flew away. I will confess I probably would’ve flipped it over just to witness the click-naming behavior.
Signature: Resa

Eyed Elater

Just to be clear…I fully realized the spots were protection from being eaten as a tasty snack and not true eyes.  Last reply…I also took photos of the eyed click beetle with my “real” camera if you’d like to see them they can be found on flickr. Including this one that shows the real and fake eyes:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/booturtle/7061395201/

Dear Resa,
Thank you for sending us your wonderful first hand observations of the flight and behavior of an Eyed Elater or Eyed Click Beetle.  So often, we get very spare requests for identifications with no observational information.  Our readers like reading about what they can expect to see if they encounter a creature on our pages.  We are sorry you learned the identity too late to witness the ability of this Click Beetle to “right” itself if it finds itself on its back.  We are also happy you did learn that they “eyes” are actually just markings that fool predators like birds into thinking that the Eyed Elater is actually a much larger creature and perhaps even a potential threat to a predator.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

smokey mountain bug ??
Location: East Tennessee, Smokey Mountains
March 25, 2012 2:36 pm
Found this bug hanging out on a budding tree March 25, 2012 in the Great Smokey Mnts. What do you think it is ??
Signature: Shawn Ricker

Eyed Elater

Dear Shawn,
This magnificent Click Beetle is called the Eyed Elater because of the markings on its thorax that resemble the eyes of a march larger creature, which helps to protect the beetle from being eaten.  Like other members of its family, if the Eyed Elater finds itself on its back, it snaps its body against the ground, producing a clicking sound and propelling its body into the air, allowing it to land on its feet.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination