Currently viewing the category: "Click Beetles"
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Jumping beetle
Location: Nicaragua, Managua, El Crucero ( 12° 3’45.68”N – 86°18’51.68”W)
January 30, 2012 5:49 pm
Dear Bugman,
This beetle emits a click sound when movin violently its head, the movement makes the beetle to jump a few centimeters high.
Signature: Sergiortc

Click Beetle

Dear Sergiotc,
The audible clicking sound this beetle makes has given rise to the common name Click Beetles for the members of the family Elateridae.  Click Beetles are able to flex their bodies at the joint between the thorax and abdomen if they ever find themselves on their backs.  The action propels them into the air and they generally land on their feet after the first attempt.

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identify
Location: north east thailand
November 17, 2011 6:40 pm
Saw this on the floor of an apartment block in the issarn region of thailand.Namely udon thani a city less than twenty miles form the border of Laos,It mainly agicultural and rice growing in the region..
found this in the dry season,March to may, but not 100% cklear on that,but it was four yrs ago
Signature: andy

Click Beetle

Hi Andy,
This is definitely a Beetle, but beyond that, we are stumped.  Generally we are able to at least provide a family for beetles, but there are so many physical attributes that are distinctive on this beetle that we have not seen combined in this manner.  The pectinate (see BugGuide) are probably the most distinctive feature, but the spined thorax and narrow waist connecting to the abdomen is also quite unique.  Many beetles in the superfamily Elateroidea (See BugGuide for North American examples) have similar antennae and thoracic features, including some of the Click Beetles in the family Elateridae.  At first glance, we thought this might be a Prionid, but the thorax structure seems to negate that possibility.  We need additional time to research and perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in this challenging identification.  We could not locate it on ThaiBugs.  Can you recall the size of this creature?

Unknown Beetle from Thailand

Immediate Update:
After posting we looked again at the ThaiBugs site and found a Click Beetle in the family Elateridae that looks close.  It is “unidentified and in need of a shave” and pictured as a thumbnail near the bottom of the page.

Daniel:
Yes, a click beetle!  I believe this one is Oxynopterus mucronatus, or at least something very closely related.  Thanks for sharing!
Eric

Thanks Eric,
We found matching images on Project Noah and the Click Beetles of the Palearctic Region website.

Hi daniel was about an inch long. dificult to gauge the with from memory.But remember being fascinated by the antenae type and size,which was noticably wider than the body.
Andy

 

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What’s This Bug?
August 2, 2011 7:58 AM
this is a beetle in a pine forest in missoula, montana.
thank you!
c.

Green Click Beetle

Hi Clare,
We are relatively confident that we have identified your Click Beetle as a Green Click Beetle,
Nitidolimonius resplendens, based on images posted to BugGuide, which lists the habitat as:  “variously-aged coniferous, deciduous, and mixed forests; on poplar (Populus), willow (Salix), or on shrubs; adults often found on the spring growth of conifers along margins of wetlands and drainages.”  The only sightings reported from BugGuide are in Alaska, Alberta Canada and New Hampshire.

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WHAT IS THIS?????????
Location: Denfield, ON Canada
July 21, 2011 6:31 am
I noticed this on the sidewalk yesterday. It was about 2 inches long. I have never seen anything this big or unique looking – any ideas what it is and where it could have come from?
sorry the picture is a little blurry!
Signature: Krissy

Eyed Elater

Hi Krissy,
Because of its large size, bold coloration, extensive range, and distinctive eyespots, the Eyed Elater is one of our most common summer identification requests.

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Rare Bug from NJ
Location: Woodbine, NJ
July 13, 2011 10:31 am
Hello and thanks for taking the time to possibly identify this strange looking bug from the attached pic. We found it yesterday in Woodbine, NJ in a wooded area. It hops around like a cricket.
Signature: Frank Petka

Eyed Elater

Hi Frank,
If identification requests that we receive are any indication, Eyed Elaters are not rare.  We actually have them tagged as one of our Top 10 identification requests.  Eyed Elaters are Click Beetles, and the hopping you describe is the beetle’s ability to right itself if it finds itself on its back.  It can snap its body and flip in the air, producing an audible clicking sound.  The eyespots on the Eyed Elater are a defense mechanism to frighten large predators like birds who might mistake it for a larger creature than the bite sized morsel it actually is.  We are post dating this letter to go live to our site over the weekend while we are out of the office.

Amazing response time…thanks so much…that was awesome. I will spread the word about your great site!
Regards,
Frank

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what is this
Location: kansas
July 9, 2011 10:54 pm
Curious what bug this is? It has been over 100 degrees here in central Kansas. Just noticed them over the last couple weeks. Thanks
Signature: kansas

Click Beetle

Hi kansas,
This is a Click Beetle in the family Elateridae, a large family with many similar looking species.  They are called Click Beetles because of their ability to snap their body to right themselves if they wind up on their backs, an action that produces an audible clicking sound.  Click Beetles are harmless, though some species are agricultural pests.  The larvae of Click Beetles are called Wireworms, and there are several species of Click Beetles, collectively called the Corn Wireworm, that damage young corn plants.  This Penn State website and this Purdue University website both have helpful information on the destructive Wireworm species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination