Currently viewing the category: "Checkered Beetles"
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Subject: What is this bug.
Location: Ontario, Canada
November 17, 2015 12:17 pm
We have found a couple of these in our house… wondering what it is
Signature: Krysten

Checkered Beetle

Checkered Beetle

Dear Krysten,
We believe this is a Checkered Beetle in the family Cleridae, but we are unable to find a visual match on BugGuide.  It somewhat resembles the Red Bellied Clerid,
Enoclerus nigripes rufiventris, pictured on Birding New Burnswick or Enoclerus sphegeus pictured on Bold Systems Taxonomy.  Heading back to BugGuide, we found the latter to be listed as the Red Bellied Clerid.  We will contact Eric Eaton to get his opinion.

Eric Eaton Confirms Checkered Beetle Identification
Hi, Daniel:
Yes, a checkered beetle in the genus Enoclerus.  Not sure of the species.  Jacques Rifkind is an expert on these but I forget how to get in touch with him.
Eric

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Subject: beetles
Location: southern BC, Canada
June 1, 2015 2:24 pm
I am sending 2 pictures of 2 different beetles I have found in the last 2 days. The turquoise/yellow obe was on my peonies and the other one was in the grass.
Signature: Jessica

Ornate Checkered Beetle

Ornate Checkered Beetle

Dear Jessica,
Because your two beetles must be categorized differently, we are splitting our response into two distinct postings.  We are thrilled to be able to post your image of an Ornate Checkered Beetle,
Trichodes ornatus, which we identified on BugGuide.  The members of the family, according to BugGuide, are:  “predaceous on other insects, larvae mostly on wood- and cone-borers; some adults feed on pollen; a few species are scavengers.”  According to iNaturalist:  “Larvae live in bee nests of mostly Megachilidae family species[2] and are parasitic. While in the nest they feed on the bees’ larvae or pollen. When they mature into an adult they begin feeding on yarrow, milkweed, and other plants of yellow colouration. The species males are 5–11 millimetres (0.20–0.43 in) long while females are 7–15 millimetres (0.28–0.59 in).” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it?
Location: Sydney
December 23, 2014 5:09 am
Hoping you can identify.
Found on a cruise ship that had travelled from Brisbane in Queensland, prior to this in South Pacific Islands. Nov 28th this yr.
Thanks for your efforts!
Signature: Zeb

Checkered Beetle

Checkered Beetle

Dear Zeb,
This is a Checkered Beetle in the family Cleridae, but we are not certain of the species.  There are several similar looking individuals on the Insects of Brisbane website as well as on the Cleridae of Australia site where an image of
Trogodendron fasciculatum looks like a very close match.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange bug~
Location: Western Maryland
November 22, 2014 12:26 pm
I was doing some cleaning around my apartment and I went to move my exercise ball and found this orange striped beauty. I have never seen one like it before. I took a picture of it then moved it outside.
Signature: Bugs are Friends

Checkered Beetle

Checkered Beetle

This is a Checkered Beetle in the family Cleridae, possibly Enoclerus muttkowskii which is pictured on BugGuide.  Checkered Beetles, according to BugGuide, are;:  “predaceous on other insects, larvae mostly on wood- and cone-borers; some adults feed on pollen; a few species are scavengers.”

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Unknown Beetle

Checkered Beetle

Unknown Beetle

Checkered Beetle

Subject: Borers in Oregon
Location: Josephine Co., Oregon
October 19, 2014 5:39 pm
We were splitting Madrone firewood today (10/19/14), and it was full of borers of some kind. There were two varieties. The black & green variety was the most common (probably 90%), but there were also some of the red and black. We’re interested in learning more about them, particularly whether they’re a threat to our woods.
Signature: Jim

Hi Jim,
We have not had much luck identifying your red and black beetles, but it might be partly due to the lack of clarity in the images, and that they look velvety in texture, but we are not sure if that is an illusion.  Please clarify the tomentosity of your beetle, because other than the apparent texture of your individuals,  they remind us of Pleasing Fungus Beetles which are pictured on BugGuide.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to write in with an identification.

Arthur Evans identifies Checkered Beetle
Daniel,
Just saw this post on your page. It is a clerid beetle, Chariessa elegans <http://bugguide.net/node/view/169445>.
Cheers, ART
Arthur V. Evans, D.Sc.
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Research Collaborator:  Department of Entomology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Inornate Checkered Beetle Eating Grasshopper Eggs?
Location: Albuquerque, NM
May 20, 2014 6:37 pm
Lately I’ve run across several strange beetles in the house of a type that I don’t remember having seen before. I looked around on Bugguide.net for a while and think I’ve managed to identify them as Inornate Checkered Beetles. There doesn’t seem to be much information on this particular species, but a quick internet search indicates that some checkered beetle species feed on grasshoppers and grasshopper eggs, and we’ve been having a local explosion of grasshoppers lately. (Third picture is an example of one of these grasshoppers.) What do you think?
Signature: Cat

Inornate Checkered Beetle

Inornate Checkered Beetle

Hi Cat,
We have researched the Inornate Checkered Beetle,
Cymatodera inornata, which we have located on BugGuide., and we believe you have correctly identified the genus, but the species may be incorrect because the distribution map for the Inornate Checkered Beetle does not contain any sightings west of the Mississippi River.  The description of the species on BugGuide indicates its range as being:  “Eastern N. Amer. to UT & AZ,” supporting your identification of the species.  Another member of the genus, Cymatodera dietrichi,  looks very similar and is found in New Mexico and Texas, according to BugGuide.  Of the genus, BugGuide notes:  “adults are predaceous, feeding (in part) on the larvae of gall wasps, fruit tree lepidoptera, and wood-boring beetles” and there is no mention of Grasshoppers.

Inornate Checkered Beetle

Inornate Checkered Beetle

Your identification of the Pallid Winged Grasshopper, Trimerotropis pallidipennis, appears to be correct based on images on BugGuide.  We don’t believe there is any relationship between the appearance of the Checkered Beetles and the large number of Grasshoppers, but we might be wrong.

Pallid Winged Grasshopper

Pallid Winged Grasshopper

Thanks! We still get plenty of wood-boring beetles and fruit tree lepidoptera around here too, so the checkered beetles will still be able to find plenty to eat even without the grasshoppers!

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination