Currently viewing the category: "Checkered Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Inornate Checkered Beetle Eating Grasshopper Eggs?
Location: Albuquerque, NM
May 20, 2014 6:37 pm
Lately I’ve run across several strange beetles in the house of a type that I don’t remember having seen before. I looked around on Bugguide.net for a while and think I’ve managed to identify them as Inornate Checkered Beetles. There doesn’t seem to be much information on this particular species, but a quick internet search indicates that some checkered beetle species feed on grasshoppers and grasshopper eggs, and we’ve been having a local explosion of grasshoppers lately. (Third picture is an example of one of these grasshoppers.) What do you think?
Signature: Cat

Inornate Checkered Beetle

Inornate Checkered Beetle

Hi Cat,
We have researched the Inornate Checkered Beetle,
Cymatodera inornata, which we have located on BugGuide., and we believe you have correctly identified the genus, but the species may be incorrect because the distribution map for the Inornate Checkered Beetle does not contain any sightings west of the Mississippi River.  The description of the species on BugGuide indicates its range as being:  “Eastern N. Amer. to UT & AZ,” supporting your identification of the species.  Another member of the genus, Cymatodera dietrichi,  looks very similar and is found in New Mexico and Texas, according to BugGuide.  Of the genus, BugGuide notes:  “adults are predaceous, feeding (in part) on the larvae of gall wasps, fruit tree lepidoptera, and wood-boring beetles” and there is no mention of Grasshoppers.

Inornate Checkered Beetle

Inornate Checkered Beetle

Your identification of the Pallid Winged Grasshopper, Trimerotropis pallidipennis, appears to be correct based on images on BugGuide.  We don’t believe there is any relationship between the appearance of the Checkered Beetles and the large number of Grasshoppers, but we might be wrong.

Pallid Winged Grasshopper

Pallid Winged Grasshopper

Thanks! We still get plenty of wood-boring beetles and fruit tree lepidoptera around here too, so the checkered beetles will still be able to find plenty to eat even without the grasshoppers!

 

 

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Subject: Blue Bug
Location: Not sure
January 30, 2014 1:13 am
Hi there,
We import a dry dog food from Midwest US and with the last few containers we had a blue bug in the container. The container is transported via the Panama Canal from Pennsylvania – we wonder if it could have some from there.
I am sorry but my photos are not that good.. but here we go..
Image 1: dead, but you can see the legs
Image 2: dead, but you can get an idea of the size
Image 3: there are about 5-6 live ones in the bag with the dog food
Your help will be much appreciated
Signature: Not sure

Red Legged Ham Beetle

Red Legged Ham Beetle

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Thank you for submitting your identification request.
Please understand that we have a very small staff that does this as a labor of love. We cannot answer all submissions (not by a long shot). But we’ll do the best we can!

Red Legged Ham Beetle

Red Legged Ham Beetle

Hi there,
How will I know if you don’t have time to reply?
Thanks,
Malene

Red Legged Ham Beetles in Dog Food!!!

Red Legged Ham Beetles in Dog Food!!!

Dear Malene,
Thank you for your patience.  It appears you have an infestation of Red Legged Ham Beetles,
Necrobius rufipes.  Even though the photo is blurry, the red legs are very obvious in your second image.  According to Forensics Topics, a high profile occupation thanks to all the crime scene investigation shows on television:  “This beetle is small in size with a bluish/green metallic body. Notice the red leggs-hence [sic] the name. This beetle shows up during dryer stages of decomposition.”  We suspect that there are also larvae in the dog food.  According to BugGuide:  “found on dried fish, skins and bones of dead animals, and other carrion; also found on museum specimens” and “Eggs are laid on the food material; larvae pass through three or four instars; the last instar spins a cocoon in which pupation occurs; life-cycle takes 6 weeks or longer depending on food type and physical conditions. Under optimum conditions, the rate of population increase is about 25 times per month. The adults fly actively and can thus easily disperse to new sources of food.”

Thank you so much Daniel. Much appreciated.

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Subject: Ant Beetle ?
Location: Balung River Eco Resort, Tawau, Sabah, Borneo.
November 18, 2013 6:27 am
Dear Mr. Bugman, I am glad to be able to return to this site again.
This time I have found a tiny ant-like beetle which I could not identify.
It’s length is smaller than 15mm. Could it be a Cleridae species?
Signature: C. X. Wong

Possibly Checkered Beetle

Possibly Checkered Beetle

Dear C. X. Wong,
Your beetle does resemble a Checkered Beetle in the family Cleridae, but we cannot say for certain that is a correct family identification.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to confirm the family and provide some more specific information.

Possibly Checkered Beetle

Possibly Checkered Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red Beetle with black spots
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
June 30, 2013 6:57 pm
First thing that came to mind was lady bug, but it’s not similar in shape. Found in Cincinnati in mid-spring.
I live in Cincinnati, OH, and never saw so many different types of insects before, I moved here from cold Minneapolis, MN.
Signature: Emily Rose

Four Spotted Checkered Beetle

Four Spotted Checkered Beetle

Dear Emily Rose,
We quickly dismissed that this might be a Leaf Beetle and we then identified it as a Four Spotted Checkered Beetle,
Pelonides quadripunctatus, thanks to images posted to BugGuide, which indicates the beetles are active:  “March-May.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wondering if this is a spider
Location: Dordogne,France
April 25, 2013 6:18 am
Dear WTB,
I took this picture in my kitchen before putting it in the garden- it looks like it could nip. It was probably staying out of the sun. I cant say I’ve seen one here ever -France. It is about 1-1.5 cm in length. It looks like venom from spiderman , maybe the inspiration. Thanks
Signature: Alan Harvey

Checkered Beetle

Checkered Beetle

Dear Alan,
This is a Checkered Beetle in the family Cleridae, not a spider.  According to BugGuide, Checkered Beetles are:  “predaceous on other insects, larvae mostly on wood- and cone-borers; some adults feed on pollen; a few species are scavengers.”  Your Checkered Beetle looks somewhat similar to this image of
Thanasimus formicarius from FlickR.

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Subject: Orange Bug on Tulip Poplar
Location: Great Falls, VA
November 13, 2012 3:48 pm
I noticed recently that some of the large branches on a 150+ year old tulip poplar have been debarked. This is in northern virginia.
Yesterday, i found a number of ant-like insects on the tree. They have 6 legs and seem to have two defined body segments.
If you look at the insect from tail to head, it has a bright orange behind, a black horizontal stripe, and an orange top to the main body. The head is reddish orange. The legs are black.
I’d like to find out what kind of insect this is. I’ve never seen anything like it. The closest thing i can find is a cow killer, but those are furry. This is smoothe with no real fur.
Thanks for your help.
Signature: john marciano

Checkered Beetle

Hi John,
This little beauty is a Checkered Beetle, possibly
Enoclerus ichneumoneus Checkered Beetles are not damaging your tree, and they are most likely feeding on insects that might be negatively impacting the health of the tree.  According to BugGuide:  “predaceous on other insects, larvae mostly on wood- and cone-borers; some adults feed on pollen; a few species are scavengers.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination