Currently viewing the category: "Carrion Beetles"
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Subject: Bug Love – American Carrion Beetle
Location: Southwest Indiana
May 26, 2016 8:17 pm
Hello! I wanted to share some photos I took last summer of a pair of American Carrion Beetles with their mites. They were collected around some cat vomit…which might have had some mouse remains in it. (oh so pleasant!) Somehow the photo was forgotten until now – probably because I had embarrassment over taking bug love photos, ha ha!
Thank you for the awesome site. It’s my go-to place when I find a new bug, and I’ve never had to ask for identification – I always find what I’m looking for! We practice organic gardening on our little homestead, and I often find new creatures – so I visit your site often!
Thanks again!
Signature: Heather

Mating Carrion Beetles and Phoretic Mites

Mating Carrion Beetles and Phoretic Mites

Dear Heather,
We are so thrilled to find out that you find our site so helpful.  We are also thrilled to post your images of a pair of mating American Carrion Beetles and their Phoretic Mites.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mole eating bug
Location: Massachusetts
April 18, 2016 3:02 pm
I found this dead mole on a trail and all of these unknown bugs were all over it. I would like to you what type of bugs these are.
Signature: Sarina B

Ridged Carrion Beetles and Margined Carrion Beetles eat Dead Mole

Ridged Carrion Beetles and Margined Carrion Beetles on Dead Mole

Dear Sarina,
At least two species of Carrion Beetles, the all black Ridged Carrion Beetle,
Oiceoptoma inequale, and the red and black Margined Carrion Beetle, Oiceoptoma noveboracense, are gathering around this dead mole.  Of the Ridged Carrion Beetle, BugGuide states:  “Adults consume fly larvae at carrion.”   Of the Margined Carrion Beetle, BugGuide states:  “Adults sometimes consume fly larvae (maggots) on carrion.”

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Subject: unusual beetle
Location: Western Harford County, MD, USA
September 29, 2015 1:13 pm
Hi!
We found this fella a few days ago on our deck at our home in Harford County, MD. Hadn’t seen one like it before- and haven’t been able to ID it!
Thanks!
Signature: Bob and Susan

American Carrion Beetle

American Carrion Beetle

Dear Bob and Susan,
As its name implies, this American Carrion Beetle feeds on rotting flesh, though it will also feed on certain smelly fungus.

Thank you SO MUCH Daniel!  Pretty interesting little fella!
Bob

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: flying beetle?
Location: Newfoundland Canada,
August 21, 2015 8:21 am
Can anyone identify this flying beetle? They hit the patio in a swarm over the weekend. Not sure if they were loosing their wings after a while or not. You can see wings and orange markings clearly in some of the pictures.
Newfoundland Canada,
Signature: Danny

Red LIned Carrion Beetle

Red LIned Carrion Beetle

Dear Danny,
Though the antennae are quite different, your beetle resembles a Burying Beetle in the genus Nicrophorus enough for us to begin searching with that as a lead.  We found images of the Red Lined Carrion Beetle,
Necrodes surinamensis, on BugGuide and we are satisfied that is your beetle.  The BugGuide description is:  “Distinctive, large eyes, dark body with prominent raised elytral ridges, variable red-orange, sometimes yellow, markings on elytra, though these sometimes absent. Sometimes has red tinge to body. Males have distinctive leg morphology: expanded hind femora with a large tooth on each, and expanded foretarsi.  Also, abdomen of male appears to jut out from under abdomen much more than female.”  BugGuide also notes:  “Adults consume fly larvae (maggots), and perhaps some carrion” and “Rather nocturnal and is found at lights, unlike related genera. Adults locate carrion and mate on or near carcass. They feed on fly larvae there. Eggs are laid on soil near carcass. Larvae feed on fly larvae and carrion, pupate in soil. Adults overwinter in under litter(?) or in other protected areas. See Ratcliffe (1) for details. This species is supposed to be attracted especially, to dead birds.”  The shininess of your images indicates they were most likely shot with an on camera flash, leading us to suspect this was a nocturnal swarm.  We suspect this was a recent mass emergence nearby that was attracted to your lights.  In light of the fact that Red Lined Carrion Beetles feed on fly maggots, we would urge you to consider this recent swarm a brief annoyance of a beneficial species.

Red Lined Carrion Beetle

Red Lined Carrion Beetle

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Subject: My dog stayed far away!
Location: Whitehorse Yukon Canada
August 10, 2015 10:58 am
Hi there bugman. What the heck is this bug? He came crawling onto the deck of our cabin at around midnight. My dog saw it and pounced but then quickly spit it out and started salivating all over the place. She did not like the taste I guess…lucky for the beetle!
We are in Whitehorse, Yukon Canada. It was mild weather out and had just turned dark when this little trooper made his appearance.
Any info would be great. Thanks!
Signature: Almost Beetlejuice

Sexton Beetle

Sexton Beetle

Dear Almost Beetlejuice,
This is a Sexton Beetle or Burying Beetle in the genus Nicrophorus.  Their common name is derived from the manner in which they provide for their young.  Males and females work together to bury small dead animals, and then they stay close to guard their larvae while they feed on both the putrefying flesh.  According to BugGuide, they exhibit “Remarkable parental care: adults bury a small carcass, lay eggs in it, and stay to feed the young on regurgitated carrion.”  One possible species is
Nicrophorus defodiens which according to BugGuide is found in the northern portions of the Pacific Northwest.

Update:  August 21, 2015
While researching a different genus of Carrion Beetle, we found this statement on BugGuide:  “Has chemical defenses, and smells foul, like all carrion beetles and their larvae.”  That probably explains your dog’s reaction.

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Subject: Unknown beetle
Location: Baker Lake, WA
June 28, 2015 5:28 pm
Hello- I found this beetle on dung on the Baker Lake Trail that runs along the eastern edge of Baker Lake in Washington State. Is this a burying beetle?
Signature: AJ Knue

Sexton Beetle

Sexton Beetle

Dear AJ,
You are correct that this is a Burying Beetle or Sexton Beetle in the genus
Nicrophorus, and we believe based on both its appearance and range, that this Nicrophorus defodiens that is pictured on BugGuide is a likely species identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination