Currently viewing the category: "Blister Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: red-headed bug???
Location: Tahquitz Canyon, Near Palm Springs, CA
March 7, 2015 2:33 pm
Hi
I was hiking in Tahquitz Canyon near Palm Springs, CA yesterday and spotted this bug crawling across the path. It’s almost 2″ long.
Can you let us know what it was?
Many thanks,
Signature: Stu

Master Blister Beetle

Master Blister Beetle

Dear Stu,
This distinctive beetle is a Master Blister Beetle, and your image is the first of what we suspect will be numerous others that are sent to us this spring.

Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wondering what kind of ant is this
Location: Acworth, GA
February 9, 2015 12:15 pm
I found this large ant, assuming it is/was a queen, in my garden while weeding. I live in Acworth, GA and the ant was dead, but wanted to know what kind it is. It was about an inch in length and as far as I could tell completely black in color. Any ideas?? Thanks!
Signature: Gwen

Oil Beetle

Oil Beetle

Dear Gwen,
What you have mistaken for an Ant is actually an Oil Beetle in the genus
Meloe

Thank you!!!  Now I know not to touch a live one since they can cause blisters on human skin…always good to know!!
Love your site and appreciate all the information.
Gwen

Alfonso Moreno liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: black beauty
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
October 25, 2014 7:49 pm
This black beauty was photographed today, Oct 25 in a ravine in Toronto, Ontario Canada. It was about 1-1/14″ long and moving steadily through a grassy area. We thought it looked like it was full of eggs or something since its abdomen was so huge compared to the head and thorax.
Signature: anne murphy

Oil Beetle

Oil Beetle

Dear Anne,
This distinctive insect is an Oil Beetle, a species of Blister Beetle in the genus
Meloe.  According to BugGuide:  “Males smaller than females, with modified antennae” and several images of the modified antennae are included.  Your close-up image of the Oil Beetle’s head appear to show the modified antennae, so though you suspected this to be a gravid female, we believe it is a male Oil Beetle.

Head of Oil Beetle

Head of Oil Beetle

Thank you so much Daniel!  I am so glad you could identify that insect.  Now I’ll look it up and learn more about it.  So, the female would be even bigger.  Wow!  Hope we come across one some day.  Thanks again.
anne

 

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Jessica M. Schemm liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Mating Oil Beetles

Mating Oil Beetles

Subject: Blue Beetle
Location: Castine Maine
October 11, 2014 10:10 am
Multiple Blue Beetle apparently copulating in path October 5, 2014 in Castine ME. I write a nature column in a local newspaper and wish to include this. I tried three photos before and it would not go. I’ll try one this time.
Signature: Peter

Dear Peter,
These are mating Blister Beetles in the genus
Meloe, and they are commonly called Oil Beetles.  We have numerous examples of mating Oil Beetles on our website.

MaryBeth Kelly liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Kindersley, Saskatchewan, Canada
August 15, 2014 9:15 pm
Found this beetle (?) dying on my concrete this evening. I live in Kindersley, Saskatchewan. It has a brilliant metallic green body, head of a wasp and dusty purple shell that does not run the full length of it’s body. It has been quite warm and humid lately for August and I was not sure if that is why it was around because I have never seen one before.
Signature: Stacey Herbert

Blister Beetle

Blister Beetle

Dear Stacey,
This is a Blister Beetle in the family Meloidae, and we generally prefer a dorsal view for identification purposes, but your description that includes the coloration has us relatively confident that your individual is Nuttall’s Blister Beetle,
Lytta nutalli, which is frequently reported from Canada.  Blister Beetles should not be handled as they often secrete a compound known as cantharidin that is known to cause blistering in human skin.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug eating tomato leaves
Location: Northern Shenandoah valley va
August 14, 2014 5:37 pm
This bug is all over out garden in northwestern virginia.
I would like to know what it is.
Signature: “Bugged out” in va

Margined Blister Beetle

Margined Blister Beetle

Dear Bugged out in VA,
This is a Margined Blister Beetle,
Epicauta funebris, and though BugGuide does not indicate any food preferences, we have received other reports of Margined Blister Beetles feeding on the leaves of tomatoes and other vegetables and ornamental garden plants.  In My Kitchen Garden discusses Blister Beetles in organic vegetable gardens.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination