Currently viewing the category: "Blister Beetles"
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Subject: Beetles in Portugal
Location: Serra da Mamede, Portugal
June 29, 2014 12:39 am
Hi,
We came across these very striking beetles in dry grassland in eastern Portugal. There were several pairs, apparently biting each other’s tails. They are about two inches long with big black and red abdomens. Please can you tell me what they are?
Signature: Peter Burrows

Red Striped Oil Beetles

Red Striped Oil Beetles

Dear Peter,
You are astute to recognize these Red Striped Oil Beetles,
Berberomeloe majalis, as beetles, as they are not characteristically beetle-like in appearance.  We have several images of this species of Blister Beetle in our archives from Spain as well as Portugal.  We are curious about the behavior they are exhibiting, which you liken to “tail biting” and we can’t help but to wonder if this is some type of courtship behavior.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you very much for the identification.
Peter Burrows

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Poison Insect
Location: Nertiti, Darfur, Sudan
June 19, 2014 3:16 am
Hi,
I’m Zumairi from Malaysia. No i’m working with UNAMID in Darfur, Sudan. In my Team Site in Nertiti, there is a bug that call by local as Fesseyah (it’s in arabic actually). According to the local’s, this bug is very dangerous and some of the local says it’s more dangerous than hornet! The colour of this bugs is dark green in the top while it’s abdomen and leg are black. It’ length is about 1 inch.
From local villager, i made to understand that this bug will appear themselves in within and after raining season. But sometimes i find it in whatever season. For your information, geographically, Nertiti is half desert which when the raining season, it will be green everywhere.
I need to know better about this bugs, because i never seen it before in Malaysia. And because, the local’s claim that this this bugs are very poison which can be fatal to human!
Signature: Zumairi

Blister Beetle

Blister Beetle

Dear Zumairi,
While we have not been able to identify your beetle to the species level, we can tell you that this is a Blister Beetle in the family Meloidae.  While we believe what you have heard is likely an exaggeration, it is well known that Blister Beetles are capable of secreting a compound known as cantharidin that can cause blistering in human skin.  The legendary aphrodisiac Spanish Fly is made by crushing the bodies of one species of Blister Beetle,
Lytta vesicatoria, and you can get additional information on Encyclopaedia Britannica online.  

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Subject: Beetle
Location: SE Pennsylvania not far from Kennett Square.
May 16, 2014 10:03 pm
October 2013 in SE Pennsylvania not far from Kennett Square.
Signature: Joe Halloran

Oil Beetle

Oil Beetle

Hi Joe,
Congratulations on recognizing that this Oil Beetle in the genus Meloe is actually a beetle, as most requests we received confuse it for a large ant or other insect.  Oil Beetles do not resemble typical beetles as they do not have rigid elytra covering the body and protecting the flight wings.  Oil Beetles are soft bodied beetles with rudimentary elytra.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: NE Ohio Beetle ID Request
Location: Greater Cleveland Area
May 6, 2014 5:20 pm
Hello,
I’ve never seen one like this. It stayed still for a few photos. I’m looking for an ID.
Tim
Signature: Tim Spuckler

Blister Beetle

Blister Beetle

Hi Tim,
We believe we have correctly identified your Blister Beetle as
Lytta aenea based on images posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: blister beetle
Location: almeria spain
May 5, 2014 1:16 pm
Hello,
Ive looked at the other pictures you have of this beetle but the ones I found in our garden are slightly different.
They dont have the strips or wing, just complety black body with a bright red head.
We live in almeria spain.
Signature: Laura

Blister Beetle

Blister Beetle

Hi Laura,
Through a somewhat convoluted path, we believe we have correctly identified your Blister Beetle as
Berberomeloe insignis.  We started by searching our archives and we located an all black Blister Beetle and a tentative identification as Berberomeloe insignis, but the link we originally used in 2010 is no longer active.  Upon searching the name, we discovered several images of a red eared Blister Beetle that looks very much like your individual, including this image on Los Bloggers de Axena.  Additional searching led us to a marvelous pdf on magrama.gob.es, which we figured out is a Spanish government website, but alas, our Spanish is rather insufficient to grasp the totality of the information it provides.  At least we know that Berberomeloe insignis is endemic in southern Spain, and your town Almeria is included in the range. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: who is this?
Location: Tucson Arizona, Sonoran Dessert.
May 5, 2014 12:00 pm
Hello Bug man,
My name is Brodrik, and I live in the desert west of Tucson Arizona. Many of these flying insects have made their presents know here recently, and I wonder how they are called in the science world so that I may investigate why they are now here and visable.
Many thanks,
Brodrik.
Signature: Bug man

Iron Cross Blister Beetle

Iron Cross Blister Beetle

Dear Brodrik,
This is an Iron Cross Blister Beetle in the genus
Tegrodera, and each spring, they make seasonal appearances in desert areas of Arizona, California and Baja.  It is our Bug of the Month for May 2014.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination