Currently viewing the category: "Blister Beetles"
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Subject: weird metallic beetle new mexico
Location: new mexico usa
April 16, 2015 12:23 pm
I been seeing these beetles all over my yard and in my tree wells
Signature: seraphim

Desert Spider Beetle

Desert Spider Beetle

Dear Seraphim,
Though it is commonly called a Desert Spider Beetle, this member of the genus
Cysteodemus is a Blister Beetle.  We believe it is most likely Cysteodemus wislizeni which is found in New Mexico and Texas according to BugGuide.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: beetle
Location: Pasadena MD
April 13, 2015 2:33 am
I found a species of beetle hiking across the kitchen counter and cannot identify. I walked it onto a paper towel and released outside but it did not seems to have the ability to fly.
Signature: Brian S

Blister Beetle

Blister Beetle

Dear Brian,
We believe your Blister Beetle is
Lytta aenea, a species with no common name, based on this image posted to BugGuide.

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Subject: insects near Superstition Mtn. Arizona
Location: Superstition Mountain, AZ
April 13, 2015 5:02 am
I came across these insects on a hiking trail near our house April 12, 2015 , at the base of Superstition Mtn., Arizona. Lots of people hiking were wondering what they were. Their heads and mandibles remind me of an ant and they have 3 pr. of legs. All the insects were feeding on the same flower heads, which had finished flowering and were about to produce seed. I assume they were getting a high energy feed this way.
Signature: sunburntcanuck

Iron Cross Blister Beetles Mating

Iron Cross Blister Beetles Mating

Dear sunburntcanuck,
It seems we get at least one submission each spring asking for an identification of Iron Cross Blister Beetles in the genus Tegrodera.  According to BugGuide:  “
Eriastrum [woollystar] is an important food source for all adults.”

Iron Cross Blister Beetles

Iron Cross Blister Beetles

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Subject: red-headed bug???
Location: Tahquitz Canyon, Near Palm Springs, CA
March 7, 2015 2:33 pm
Hi
I was hiking in Tahquitz Canyon near Palm Springs, CA yesterday and spotted this bug crawling across the path. It’s almost 2″ long.
Can you let us know what it was?
Many thanks,
Signature: Stu

Master Blister Beetle

Master Blister Beetle

Dear Stu,
This distinctive beetle is a Master Blister Beetle, and your image is the first of what we suspect will be numerous others that are sent to us this spring.

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Subject: Wondering what kind of ant is this
Location: Acworth, GA
February 9, 2015 12:15 pm
I found this large ant, assuming it is/was a queen, in my garden while weeding. I live in Acworth, GA and the ant was dead, but wanted to know what kind it is. It was about an inch in length and as far as I could tell completely black in color. Any ideas?? Thanks!
Signature: Gwen

Oil Beetle

Oil Beetle

Dear Gwen,
What you have mistaken for an Ant is actually an Oil Beetle in the genus
Meloe

Thank you!!!  Now I know not to touch a live one since they can cause blisters on human skin…always good to know!!
Love your site and appreciate all the information.
Gwen

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Subject: black beauty
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
October 25, 2014 7:49 pm
This black beauty was photographed today, Oct 25 in a ravine in Toronto, Ontario Canada. It was about 1-1/14″ long and moving steadily through a grassy area. We thought it looked like it was full of eggs or something since its abdomen was so huge compared to the head and thorax.
Signature: anne murphy

Oil Beetle

Oil Beetle

Dear Anne,
This distinctive insect is an Oil Beetle, a species of Blister Beetle in the genus
Meloe.  According to BugGuide:  “Males smaller than females, with modified antennae” and several images of the modified antennae are included.  Your close-up image of the Oil Beetle’s head appear to show the modified antennae, so though you suspected this to be a gravid female, we believe it is a male Oil Beetle.

Head of Oil Beetle

Head of Oil Beetle

Thank you so much Daniel!  I am so glad you could identify that insect.  Now I’ll look it up and learn more about it.  So, the female would be even bigger.  Wow!  Hope we come across one some day.  Thanks again.
anne

 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination