Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bioluminescense Beetle
Location: Illovo beach, kingsburgh, kzn, south africa
December 7, 2016 2:32 pm
Hi. I found this one flying in home about 23h00pm. Caught it in a jar with sand and some leaves. Hoping its alive tomorrow evening to show my son.
Signature: not private?

Firefly

Firefly

This is a Firefly, a beetle in the family Lampyridae, but unfortunately, we did not find a visual match on iSpot.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: long horn bug
Location: goa, india
December 2, 2016 11:15 pm
kindly id this bug please. thanks.
Signature: rastaPoPoy

Longicorn

Longicorn

Dear rastaPoPoy,
The only matching image we were able to locate is this Indian Longicorn from our own archives, and eight years ago, Karl wrote in suspecting it to be in the genus
Batocera, though unfortunately the link Karl provided does not seem to be active any longer.  We will continue to search for a genus or species verification on your lovely Longicorn.

Correction courtesy of Karl
Hi Daniel and rastaPoPoy:
It looks like this longicorn and the one from your archives are indeed the same species. Although I previously suggested that it might be a species of Batocera, it seems I was on the wrong track. In checking again I am now going to suggest that this lovely beetle is Olenecamptus bilobus (Cerambycidae: Lamiinae: Dorcaschematini). The species is widely distributed throughout Asia and Melanesia, and comes in a variety of colour variations. Two  subspecies occur in India; O. bilobus bilobus and O. bilobus indianus. The two subspecies are quite similar and your two postings could belong to either one. Here are some additional images from Assam and the Seychelles.  Regards  Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: large beetle
Location: west end of St Thomas, USVI
November 29, 2016 5:26 pm
Hi, Bugman.
I live in the US Virgin Islands. After coming home today, I noticed a large (about 9 cm long) brownish-black beetle hiding in a notch in the outside of our balcony railing. I was hoping I could get a better photo if it came out from its hiding spot after dark, but it hasn’t moved yet. I tried identifying it going on the assumption that it’s a stag beetle, but I’ve been going in circles trying to pinpoint the species. Can you help me?
Signature: Stumped on St Thomas

Stump Borer

Stump Borer

Dear Stumped on St Thomas,
This is NOT a Stag Beetle.  It is a Prionid or Stump Borer in the tribe Mallodonini.  I greatly resembles the Hardwood Stump Borer,
Mallodon dasystomus, a North American species that is known to range as far south as Columbia.  It might be the same species as this Prionid from Puerto Rico.  The site Insectoid has a checklist of species from the Caribbean.  According to the Worldwide Cerambycidae Photo Gallery, Hovorodon bituberculatum  is found on St Thomas.  The mandibles on your individual indicate it is a male.  We would advise that you steer clear of those mandibles as they look like they might do some damage.

Hi, Daniel.
Thank you for all the information. He’s still in his spot on our railing, and looking more and more like the male Hovorodon bituberculatum. I agree that his mandibles look strong and sharp and I will definitely stay out of their way.
~Mae

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Earwig no forceps
Location: Logan Canyon, Utah
November 29, 2016 12:49 am
I found an unfamiliar bug that resembles an earwig. Although it looked similar, it was missing the forceps located near the rear of the insect. I extracted the DNA to see if I could use sequencing data to figure out what the insect was. My results came back as an isopod which made no sense (a pillbug). I am still trying to figure out what this bug is or the order it might belong in. If you have any advice I would appreciate it.
Signature: Linsee Park

Rove Beetle

Rove Beetle

Dear Linsee,
This is a Rove Beetle in the family Staphylinidae which is very well represented on BugGuide, but alas, there is not enough detail in your image to determine an exact species identification.  We are quite curious about the DNA testing you conducted.  Was it part of a educational program?  We fondly remember our own Fruit Fly data from a high school genetics class experiment that was so very wrong.  If your results were part of a student experiment, the error makes much more sense than if funds were expended through a for profit company.

Thank You! That helps me out a ton and gives me another place to keep researching. We conducted the DNA test for my Genetics lab course. I am currently an undergraduate at Utah State University. We used the Roche High Pure DNA Extraction kit and we amplified the 648bp region in mitochondrial cytochrome-c oxidase subunit 1 gene using the Promega PCR with GoTaq amplification kit. I was wondering if region of mitochondrial DNA that we amplifed are to conserved between different orders of insects. Could that be a possibility?
Thanks Again!
Linsee Park

Hi again Linsee,
Thanks for the DNA clarification.  Alas, our editorial staff does not have the necessary science background to answer your questions regarding shared DNA among the lower beasts.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big? Larvae?
Location: Philadelphia
November 27, 2016 6:27 pm
Hello
I used to see a random one or two of these in my bathroom and recently have been finding them in the kitchen working thier way to dropped dry catfood
Signature: LK

Carpet Beetle Larva

Carpet Beetle Larva

Dear LK,
This is a Carpet Beetle larva, a common household pest that will eat many organic materials in the home, including shed pet hair and natural fibers in carpets like wool.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: larvae
Location: NE Pennsylvania, near Philadelphia
November 20, 2016 11:17 am
Dear Bugman,
Can you help me identify these larvae? I found them under a decaying mushroom. The mushroom looked similar to a reishi mushroom. I found them on September 21, ’16,not far from my vegetable garden. The mushrooms were growing around the roots of a decaying maple tree trunk. There were other mushrooms just like this. Good bug, or not so for my garden? I left them for the birds to eat, also they were really cool looking.
Thanks for any help with this.
Signature: Best, Marie Cooney

Pleasing Fungus Beetle Larvae

Pleasing Fungus Beetle Larvae

Dear Marie,
Because you found them in association with a “decaying mushroom,” we took the chance that these might be Pleasing Fungus Beetle larvae, and our hunch proved correct based on this BugGuide image of
Megalodacne fasciata.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on bracket fungi. Adults overwinter under bark, often in groups.”  In our opinion, this is a benign or beneficial species in the garden.

YAY! Thank you so much for identifying, it was driving me crazy!
Best,
Marie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination