Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Longhorn Beetle from Barbados
Location: Barbados, Caribbean
April 21, 2014 9:50 pm
Hi, This green longhorn beetle (looks like Chlorida festiva) flew into my room to get its picture taken last night. First time I’m seeing one of these and it was about 4cm (body) long. I also noticed what looks to be mites on its ‘neck’ area, can you confirm this? Thought it would be a nice addition to your collection.
Signature: Niaz

Longicorn, Chlorida Festiva, with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn, Chlorida festiva, with Phoretic Mites

Hi Niaz,
We agree that you have correctly identified your Longicorn as
Chlorida festiva, but in searching for an image online for a link, we stumbled upon this Superstock image of Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites identified as Histiogaster arborsignis.  Phoretic Mites do not prey upon the Longicorns, but rather use them to move from location to location.  Back to the Longicorn, according to American Insects:  “Linnaeus described this large and striking species in 1758. It can be found in the West Indies, and from Mexico south to Argentina.”  Your images are gorgeous.

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dung Beetle or Scarab?
Location: Lempira, Honduras
April 21, 2014 8:06 am
Keep up the good work you do, if you have time to tell me what this is I appreciate it! This was taken at a hot springs in the early evening in late March.
Signature: Matthew Hilchey

Ox Beetle

Ox Beetle

Dear Matthew,
This beauty looks like an Ox Beetle in the genus
Strategus to us.  According to BugGuide, they are found in:  “Southern North America, esp. coastal plain of southeastern United States. Genus extends into neotropics.”  The type locality for Strategus aloeus is listed as Honduras on Encyclopedia of Life.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black & Yellow 2 inch Bug
Location: Concord CA
April 20, 2014 9:19 pm
Should I be concerned about this bug? Or is it just a beetle? It is about two inches long with four inch antennae. The head is black. The body is mostly yellow from the head to the black band before getting to the yellow butt area. There are two symmetrically located black dots in the yellow area of its back. The legs and antennae appear to be brown.
I found this bug on an exterior garage wall under a light on Sunday, April 20, 2014. We live in Concord, CA, about 35 miles east of San Francisco. It is starting to stay warm throughout the day (average of 70′s to 80′s). The weather is cool at night with dew in the morning, and dry/not humid during the day.
The closest I could come to identifying it is calling an “Instable Longhorn beetle Judolia spp Family Cerambycidae” from the website address below:

http://share2.esd105.org/rsandelin/Fieldguide/Animalpages/Insects/Beetles.htm

The attached photo was taken with my iPhone and emailed to me as “Actual” size.
I’m not sure what to make of it. Any information you can provide will be greatly appreciated.
Thank you,
Raymond Winters
Signature: Ray W. of Concord CA

Eucalyptus Longhorn

Eucalyptus Longhorn

Dear Ray,
While you have misidentified this Longhorn Borer Beetle, you did get the family correct.  This is actually a Eucalyptus Longhorned Borer and it is an invasive species in Southern California, but luckily, its host tree is also an introduced genus, the Eucalyptus trees, which are ubiquitous in Southern California.  More information on Eucalyptus Longhorned Borers can be found on the UC Davis Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Rainbow larva
Location: Southwest Louisiana
April 18, 2014 6:35 pm
Located these beauties munching on a small tree a few hundred yards from the coast here in southwestern Louisiana. Relatively small at less than a 1/2 inch. Not very active and pretty much play dead when disturbed. Internet search turned up nothing. Any ideas?
Thank you!!
Signature: Karla

Groundselbush Beetle Larva

Groundselbush Beetle Larva

Hi Karla,
We were just going to write back that this is the larva of a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae, but we decided to continue searching for its species identity.  After a bit of searching, we found a matching image of a Groundselbush Beetle Larva,
Trirhabda bacharidis, on BugGuide, and we are confident that it is the correct identification for your individual.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae and adults feed exclusively on leaves of Baccharis (Asteraceae) and it has been “Introduced into Australia and Asia to control Baccharis.”  We thought this was a new species for our site, but we were wrong.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Metallic Blue Bug
Location: Kabini, India
April 18, 2014 11:12 pm
Hi,
I have an AP Bio project to do, and in it, we must take pictures of and identify various organisms. I encountered this one on my summer vacation and was desperately hoping for some help as no website has sufficed so far. Thanks!
Signature: Aria

Leaf Beetle

Leaf Beetle

Dear Aria,
Your photo is of a very low resolution, and it will most likely be impossible to identify this Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae to the species level unless you have a larger file.  It does look very much like this unidentified Leaf Beetle from India that is represented on TrekNature.

Thank you so much for trying, but unfortunately, i don’t have a larger file.
Thanks again!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black & Maroon Fuzzy Beetle
Location: Carson City, NV
April 18, 2014 11:53 pm
Hi Bugman & crew! We took a mountain hike this afternoon & found this beauty. I’d say it was just under an inch long. Found him on a gorgeous 70-degree day in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of Northern Nevada – Carson City, specifically. I’ve tried to search the web & your site for identification but every search wants it to be a velvet ant, which I know it’s definitely not! Thanks for your help!
Signature: Michelle Pedersen

Paracotalpa ursina

Paracotalpa ursina

Dear Michelle,
You are correct.  This is not a Velvet Ant.  It is a Scarab in the subfamily Rutelinae, the Shining Leaf Chafers, and sadly, it does not have a common name, but we have identified it as
Paracotalpa ursina.  There is also an image on CalPhotos where it is identified as a Little Bear, a reference to its scientific species name.  The Sam Wells Bug Page has a nice account of an encounter with Little Bears near Fresno.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination