Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
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Subject: Metallic wheeled beetle
Location: Buckinghamshire, England
February 22, 2015 12:06 pm
Hello, I’m a gardener living in the south of England. I saw these beetles living on a rosemary bush. There was about 15-20 of them. I saw the over two seasons on the same rosemary bush but never anywhere else in the garden or in England for that matter.
Any ideas?
Signature: Jackson Rowe

Rosemary Leaf Beetle

Rosemary Leaf Beetle

Dear Jackson,
You have the hands of a gardener.  Your beetle is a Rosemary Leaf Beetle,
Chrysolina americana, which is sometimes called merely a Rosemary Beetle.  Knowing that it feeds on a single plant in your garden, Rosemary, is a good way to search for its identity.  According to UK Safari:  “Despite the scientific name, this beetle is a native of southern Europe.  It was first noticed in the U.K. in the early 1990’s and has since become well established.”  You can locate additional information on the Royal Horticultural Society website where it states:  “The larvae and adults feed on the foliage of rosemary and related plants.  Rosemary beetle is a pest that eats the foliage and flowers of various aromatic plants, such as rosemary, lavender, sage and thyme.  Initially rosemary beetle was found mainly in London gardens, but it is rapidly spreading and is becoming widespread throughout England and Wales, and possibly further north.”

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Subject: new bug
Location: Bend Oregon
February 21, 2015 11:47 pm
this is a new bug all over my house we were on vacations to Thailand for 2 weeks and the day I got back I notice this bug all over the house, is not in the rooms just in the kitchen and the living room! but in the last two hours I saw 5 of them… please help me
Signature: Marian

Beetle

Cedar Tree Borer

Hi Marian,
We are requesting assistance from Eric Eaton to help identify your beetle.

Hi Eric,
It looks a bit like a checkered beetle, but the person from Bend Oregon who sent the picture has indicated that significant numbers are appearing inside the home, which makes me wonder if it is a wood borer.
Daniel

Eric Eaton provides identification:  Cedar Borer
Daniel:
It is indeed a longhorned woodborer, the Cedar Tree Borer, Semanotus ligneus.  Here’s the Bugguide link:
Yes, they are likely emerging from firewood, but potentially from the structure itself, or cedar furniture.  For reasons still unclear, when a beetle larva is trapped inside milled lumber, it frequently extends the life cycle of the larva by years, sometimes decades.  Then, suddenly, beetles are popping out of whatever the lumber was used to build.
Eric Eaton

Hi Again Marian,
Eric Eaton has identified your Cedar Tree Borer, and Bugguide indicates it feeds on “Juniper, Cedar”
in the larval stage.  Since you found significant numbers in the home, we are speculating that wood that was infested with larvae resulted in a mass eclosion or emergence.  Perhaps there was some firewood in the home, or perhaps you bought a recent piece of cedar or juniper furniture made with infested wood.

Daniel and Eric thank you so much! yes there was so firewood (juniper) inside.
Thank you again !
Marian

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Subject: Beautiful beetle
Location: California
February 21, 2015 3:04 pm
Hello again! I found this lovely iridescent beetle this morning, sitting on a leaf near one of our tiny seasonal creeks. It looks something like Chrysochus auratus, but the references I see for that species say it is found in Northeastern US, and I am in the Sierra Foothills of California (oak savannah terrain). Can you help me identify this one?
Signature: Megan Ralph

Possibly Leaf Beetle

Possibly Leaf Beetle

Dear Megan,
This is not a Dogbane Leaf Beetle, but we believe your metallic beetle is also a member of the Leaf Beetle family Chrysomelidae.  At this time, our research has not produced a visual match.

 

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Subject: Unknown Insect
Location: South Africa, Cape Town
February 20, 2015 1:13 am
Found this interesting insect in my moms garden in Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa.
It looks similar to a grasshopper but have no idea what it is. Have never seen this before. Hope you can help identify it.
Signature: JC Hanekom

Cape Longhorn

Cape Longhorn

Dear JC Hanekom,
This looks to us like a Cape Longhorn,
Ceroplesis capensis, which is pictured on iSpot, but for some reason, your individual is missing its distinctive long antennae.

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Subject: University Assignment
Location: Vereeniging, South Africa
February 21, 2015 6:19 am
Hi bugman!
I’m currently doing an assignment which requires me to find and identify insects that I come across and I recently found this beetle type thing. I’ve tried searching for the characteristics online but I haven’t found a picture that matches mine. It looks to be some type of beetle but it doesn’t seem to have any wings. It’s about 2 – 2.5cm long and about 1cm wide at its widest point. I live in South Africa, and it is currently the last month of Summer here. Please help!
Signature: Jess

Beetle

Lily Weevil

Dear Jess,
We agree that this is a Beetle, and many species of beetles, including some members of the Blister Beetle family and the Darkling Beetle family, have fused elytra that prohibit the beetles from flying.  We do not recognize this unusual beetle, and we plan to do additional research, but we have some errands to run this morning and we will return to this search.  Right now, we can say that your beetle reminds us of Desert Spider Beetles in the family Meloidae, but we searched through six pages on iSpot without finding a match.  Additionally, the antennae and legs are quite different.  Meanwhile, can you please provide us with more information on the sighting.  Where was it found?  In the home?  In the desert? On a plant?  Just as we were about to post, we decided to see if it might be a Weevil, and we believe this is a Weevil in the genus
 Brachycerus based on this image and others posted to iSpot.  We are going to go with Lily Weevil, Brachycerus labrusca, and there are several images on iSpot.

Beetle

Lily Weevil

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Subject: High School Biology Bug Project
Location: South Carolina
February 17, 2015 7:17 am
Dear Bugman(I hope this is a normal way to address one of these things),
I am supposed to identify two bugs for a biology assignment, I have a picture of my scetch of one of them attached. My teacher recommended this website, so here I am! I will give you the best description about it as I can to help you more(along with the picture of my drawing). It was about 3 cm long and 2 wide, a very round beetle-looking thing with a head that was hard to distinguish from the rest of the body. it looked like it had a hard, dark brown shell. It also looked shiny with a goldish tint. if you looked at it straight on,it looked like the edges had become a very shiny silver color. The front legs were fat and god fatter as it god closer to the feet, the front “feet” looked almost webbed or like “paws.” The middle legs were smaller and looked more normal. The back legs were also.
Thank you soooo much!
Signature: Benjamin Eddy

Dung Beetle Drawing, we believe

Dung Beetle Drawing, we believe

Dear Benjamin,
Your drawing is a very good rendering of a Scarab Beetle, more specifically a Dung Beetle.  Your description of the legs is very consistent with the physical characteristics of the legs of a Dung Beetle as well.  While it would probably be impossible to make an accurate species identification based on your drawing, this Earth-Boring Scarab Beetle,
Bolbocerosoma tumefactum, on BugGuide or this Earth-Boring Scarab Beetle, Bradycinetulus ferrugineus, also pictured on BugGuide, both look very similar to your drawing.  Of the family Geotrupidae, the Earth-Boring Scarab Beetles, BugGuide indicates:  “These beetles spend most of their lives in burrows one to four feet down, often under dung or carrion.”

Thank you sooo much! I know you have a small staff(like you said) and I am vary happy that you picked mine to do!
Thanks again,
Benjamin

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