Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
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Subject: Tomato eating June beetle?
Location: Garden, Western Wisconsin
August 26, 2014 9:31 pm
Dear bugman,
This is a new beetle I haven’t see before that ate its way through one of my tomatoes leaving behind a canyon in its wake. It’s the only one I’ve ever seen, and I can’t seem to find it any where online. It seems similar to the common June beetles, but the colors are much more vibrant and it has a healthy amount of hair underneath the shell and on top of its head. It is almost as wide as it is long with misshapen spots and stripes on the shell. I have not known June beetles to eat fruits so this is rather puzzling. Maybe a type of Japanese beetle?
Signature: Derek

Scarab Beetle

Possibly Bumble Flower Beetle

Hi Derek,
June Beetles and Japanese Beetles are both Scarab Beetles in the family Scarabaeidae, and the tomato eater in your image is also a Scarab Beetle, but it is neither a June Beetle nor a Japanese Beetle.  This is not the ideal image for identification as it does not show the entire beetle.  It might be a Bumble Flower Beetle,
Euphoria inda, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults visit flowers for pollen and/or nectar. Sometimes damage flowers. Also takes rotting fruit, corn, sap, other plant juices.” 

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Subject: larva of what?
Location: Meadow in Southern MN USA
August 24, 2014 7:56 pm
Hello there Bugman & Staff,
We work at the local Nature center here & ran across this unusual bug. We have these two shots of it. We have searched, but to no avail… now I am searching sites online. This was found friday aug. 22nd, in a meadow on a grass. It did not seem to be feeding on the plant. We found it during our search for monarch caterpillars. ( We tag the adults & use some of them in a display for the public). We would appreciate any help or guidance identifying this small creature. We are located in Southern Minnesota.
Thank you kindly,
Jillian
Signature: Nature Center Staff

Sunflower Tortoise Beetle Larva

Sunflower Tortoise Beetle Larva

Dear Jillian,
We knew immediately that this creature is a Tortoise Beetle Larva, and that thing on the end of its tail is excrement.
  We felt it could not be an Arizona Tortoise Beetle, Physonota arizonae, but we also believed it was closely related.  We believe it is the Sunflower Tortoise Beetle Larva, Physonota helianthi, which we identified on BugGuide and that belongs in the same genus.  According to BugGuide:  “Food: hosts on members of the aster family, Asteraceae.”

Sunflower Tortoise Beetle Larva

Sunflower Tortoise Beetle Larva

Thank You so graciously from our staff, to yours!
We have been identifying a lot of species, and that one gave us a hard time. It was a larva stage, I suppose that’s why. We were able to find and identify a cicada wasp, that was interesting study also.
I wont take up more of your time than necessary, I know it’s precious.
Thank You so kindly,
Jillian
“May many smiles brighten your every day!”

 

 

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Subject: Metallic Wood-boring Beetle?
Location: El Paso, TX
August 24, 2014 2:43 am
I found this beetle dead on a small puddle in my backyard, luckily it was in good condition.
I suspect it is a metallic wood boring beetle, but don’t know what type.
The closest tree to the place where I found it is an old pecan tree, is this a possible host for wood-boring beetle larva?
Signature: RAvila

Jewel Beetle

Jewel Beetle

Dear RAvila,
You are correct that this is a Metallic Wood Boring Beetle or Jewel Beetle in the family Buprestidae.  We believe we have identified your Jewel Beetle as
 Lampetis drummondi thanks to the BugGuide archive where it states:  “Adults on Acacia, Carya, Chilopsis, Condalia, Dalea, Diospyros, Euphorbia, Gossypium, Karwinskia, Nolina, Prosopis, Rhus, Quercus, Salix, Tamarix.”

Jewel Beetle

Jewel Beetle

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Subject: Tomentose Burying Beetle With Mites
Location: Toledo, OH
August 23, 2014 2:03 pm
Hello there! I’ve never been lucky enough to see one of these guys until today, and wanted to share! I’m pressure sure it’s a Tomentose Burying Beetle with Poecilochirus mites.
Thanks!
Signature: Katy

Tomentose Burying Beetle with Phoretic Mites

Tomentose Burying Beetle with Phoretic Mites

Dear Katy,
Thank you for your excellent images.  The “hairy” thorax indicates that this Burying Beetle is a Tomentose Burying Beetle,
Nicrophorus tomentosus, and according to BugGuide:  “dense yellow hair on pronotum distinctive.”  We generally identify the mites as Phoretic Mites, meaning that they use the beetle for transportation purposes, so thank you for supplying a genus name.  According to BugGuide:  “Species in this genus inhabit vertebrate carrion and ride on silphid beetles. They don’t show host specificity, but mix up in larger carcasses where adult beetles come to feed. Those on Nicrophorus ride back on the adult and enter the brood cell and reproduce there. “

Tomentose Burying Beetle with Phoretic Mites

Tomentose Burying Beetle with Phoretic Mites

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Subject: She’s carrying her babies on her back!
Location: Mt. Hood, OR
August 22, 2014 9:35 pm
Dear Bugman,
This bug flew into my house tonight. I thought it was a bumble bee at first because it’s about the same size as one and it also has black and yellow markings, When I caught it to let it outside I noticed it was covered in little bugs. I took pictures thinking you might want some. They may not have turned out very well though…
Is it some kind of beetle?
Signature: D

I figured out it’s a burying beetle and those are mites. Thank you for you’re time.

Burying Beetle with PHoretic Mites

Burying Beetle with PHoretic Mites

Dear D,
Sorry about the delay, but we have been playing tour guide to out of town visitors for the past two days.  You are correct that this is a Burying Beetle covered in Phoretic Mites.  Your initial guess was understandable as some arthropods carry around young on their backs, including Scorpions and Wolf Spiders, but very few insects utilize that means of protecting young.  One rarity is the habit of some Giant Water Bugs to have the female cement the eggs to the back of the male Giant Water Bug to protect, but only until the eggs hatch.

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Subject: Burying Beetle?
Location: Just south of Louisville, KY
August 22, 2014 10:40 pm
I found this guy (3/4 inch?) in my house. In trying to find out what it was I decided it must be a Nicrophorus pustulatus and ran into your website in researching it. Sadly, he or she seems to have expired over-night and my daughter threw it out in the morning. (It did have a pungent smell!) I live in Bullitt county KY on 10 acres and we have always had large(7-8 ft) rat snakes around. I haven’t seen any this year….might there be a cause and effect relationship between not seeing the usual snakes and seeing one of these beetles?
How efficient are they at finding clutches of eggs and do they also attack hibernating adult snakes? (Or sleeping humans?) Do snakes leave the area if they are around or have they been killed off by them?
Any info would be appreciated.
Signature: Dan

Pustulated Carrion Beetle

Pustulated Carrion Beetle

Dear Dan,
You are correct that this is
Nircrophorus pustulatus, the Pustulated Carrion Beetle, which we confirmed on BugGuide.  We would not have thought that Pustulated Carrion Beetles would have a negative impact on the rat snakes in your area, but according to BugGuide:  “Also reported to parasitize the eggs of Black Rat Snakes, Elaphe obsoleta (Blouin-Demers & Weatherhead 2000, Trumbo 2009).”

Pustulated Carrion Beetle

Pustulated Carrion Beetle

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination