Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you please identify this insect?
Location: kolkata, india
June 21, 2015 5:58 pm
This visitor was found on top of our mosquito net. We live in Kolkata, India. The body was about the size of my longest finger – quite big! It moved quickly and could fly.
Signature: tik-tiki

Mango Stem Borer

Mango Stem Borer

Dear tik-tiki,
This beetle is a Mango Stem Borer,
Batocera rufomaculata, and it is our understanding that the larvae feed on the wood of fig and avocado trees as well as mango, which makes them a threat where those fruits are grown commercially.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it?
Location: Cowan Lake Ohio
July 4, 2015 8:22 pm
Saw this bad boy while camping in south central Ohio.
Signature: Help

Brownish Red Stag Beetle

Brownish Red Stag Beetle

Sightings of Brownish Red Stag Beetles are especially numerous this year.

 

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Subject: Domestic or foreign
Location: Santa Rosa, Ca
July 5, 2015 8:27 am
Found this one in our dining room in Santa Rosa, Ca. This is a first sighting.
Signature: Pat

California Prionus

California Prionus

Dear Pat,
This is a native species known as a California Prionus or California Root Borer.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults active summer through early fall; fly at dusk or in the evening.  Food Larva feed primarily on living deciduous trees (oaks, madrone, cottonwood) and are also recorded from roots of vines, grasses, and decomposing hardwoods and conifers. Will also attack fruit trees growing on light, well-drained soils (e.g. apple, cherry, peach).”  Especially males are attracted to lights, and your individual is a male as evidenced by his highly developed antennae. 

Wonderful!  We have all those trees you mentioned.  Bad enough we have to contend with Sudden Oak Death.  But, thank you very much for your response.
Pat

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Subject: Shiny green beetle
Location: London SE13
July 6, 2015 6:11 am
Hi
can you help me identify this beetle, reasonable abundant at the moment inmy local cemetary (Brockley & Ladywell), and usually found on flower heads
thanks
Signature: A Smith

Thick Legged Flower Beetle

Thick Legged Flower Beetle

Dear A Smith,
We located your beetle on Nature Spot where it is identified as a Swollen Thighed Beetle,
Oedemera nobilis, and this information is provided:  “Habitat Flower meadows, gardens and waste ground where they visit flowers.  When to see it April to September.  Life History This beetle is a pollen feeder.”  It is a False Blister Beetle in the family  Oedemeridae.  We found it in our archives and we previously used the common name Thick Legged Flower Beetle.

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Subject: anteater/poop bug
Location: calgary, alberta, canada
July 4, 2015 12:05 am
Where shall I start? Well I’m an avid fisher in alberta and tend to come across alot of creepy crawlers on my trips. Aswell as a fishing enthusiast, I am a bug lover….. like a HUGE bug lover. I talk to bugs, name them, baby talk with them, form friendships. (Except mosquitos, I loathe those blood sneaking, greedy little bastards! !!) Any who, upon one of my visits to chain lakes (alberta canada) I stumbled upon an adorable little creature. At first I thought it was a poop, a small bird poop. That is, until I saw it move. Upon closer inspection I noticed he had an anteater looking snout. I fell in love with this adorable little critter ! I named him Henry (pronounced on-ri) I think he was french canadian. Well I spent a good half hour admiring Henry and his adorable qualities. He crawled about doing his bug thing while I doted on his endearing qualities. I spent a good 10 minutes taking over 30 pictures of my new found friend. I adored him enough to want to take him home, but loved him enough not to keep him, alas he belongs in nature as Jesus/alah/budah intended. I eventually placed my sweet little buglet on a soft blade of grass and bid my farewell. Well, here I am at past midnight sitting on my couch bed admiring my phenomenal studioesque portraits of Henry when I decided to Google what kind of bug Henry is. I tried “bird poop bug” and “ant eater bug” to no avail, until stumbling upon you site. To you I plead, please help me identify Henry. I must know what beautiful creature grazed my life for just a brief moment. Your help is greatly appreciated!.
Signature: yours truly, Miss Panda

Withy Weevil

Withy Weevil

Dear Miss Panda,
We found your inquiry positively entertaining, and far more enjoyable to research than the typical, terse identification requests we typically receive.  We found your Poplar and Willow Borer Weevil,
Cryptorhynchus lapathi, identified on the Ibycter blog where it is called a “bird-turd weevil”, and then we turned to BugGuide for additional information.  BugGuide provides the common names:  “Poplar-and-Willow Curculio, Mottled Willow Borer, Willow Beetle, Withy Weevil” and states:  “Adults and larvae are associated with various species of willow, poplar, alder and birch (Salicaceae, Betulaceae); larvae mine young stems.”

Withy Weevil

Withy Weevil

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Ed. Note:  Since we just received these two inquiries that depict the male and the female Eastern Hercules Beetle, Dynastes tityus, we decided to feature a posting that would inform our readers that this magnificent beetle is currently being sited in the eastern portions of North America, so stay vigilant.

Subject: Large Yellow Beetle?
Location: Oxford, MS
June 22, 2015 11:24 am
Found this bug in Oxford, MS (north central) during the middle of the summer. It was outside on my porch. I am very curious because this is one of the biggest bugs I have ever seen. I was also wondering why I would not have seen more of them. I spotted when I was getting out of my car and about 15 yards away. Seems like I would’ve come across more like this unique bug.
Signature: Hotty Toddy

Male Eastern Hercules Beetle

Male Eastern Hercules Beetle

Dear Hotty Toddy,
The male Eastern Hercules Beetle is considered the heaviest North American beetle.

Subject: Beetle I’m Effingham County, Georgia
Location: Effingham County, Georgia
July 3, 2015 4:40 pm
I would appreciate assistance in identifying this beetle found in Effingham County, Georgia. Thank you.
Signature: William R.

Female Eastern Hercules Beetle

Female Eastern Hercules Beetle

Dear William,
We are really excited to get your image of a female Eastern Hercules Beetle because we just posted an image of a horny male Eastern Hercules Beetle.
  We are going to create a new featured posting with both inquiries combined.  You can get better images in the future by keeping the shadow of the cellular telephone out of the shot by slightly moving your body relative to the sun.

Female Eastern Hercules Beetle in the shadow of a cellular telephone.

Female Eastern Hercules Beetle in the shadow of a cellular telephone.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination