Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huge Beetle Found! Invasive or Not?
Location: Eastern United States, DE
July 22, 2014 11:06 pm
Hello! I’ve got a bug on my hands – well, in a jar – and I don’t know what to do with it.
I have lived in this area for 20+ years and am an avid outdoorswoman. This critter was trying to get into my house through the window screen, and I’d like some expert help figuring out just what it is. Because I’ve never, ever seen it before.
This beetle is large, nearly two inches long, with a slender body about half an inch wide. It’s a rusty reddish brown color, with black mandibles and antennae about an inch long. There are no discernible markings.
I’ve confirmed that it is not a cockroach of any variety, and if it didn’t have terrifying looking mandibles I’d be picking it up to take better photos.
I’d like to know if it’s a type of boring beetle or not, so I can know if it’s invasive or not. I’ve never seen it before and it’s rather concerning to see something this…enormous on my window trying to nibble the screen.
Any info pointing me in the right direction would be awesome. :)
Signature: ~ Kat of the Coast

Brown Prionid

Brown Prionid

Dear Kat of the Coast,
Root Borers in the family Prioninae are quite impressive beetles and there are several native species found in Delaware, even if they have managed to avoid detection by you in the past.  This is a Brown Prionid,
Orthosoma brunneum, and you are wise to avoid its mandibles.  The grubs of Root Borers live feeding on wood for several years and the mandibles of the adults need to be strong enough to chew their way to the surface once metamorphosis is complete.  We suspect this individual was attracted to light, and that is why you discovered it on your screen.  See BugGuide for additional information on the Brown Prionid.  We would urge you to release your captive Brown Prionid.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Confused Californian
Location: Stream in Northern Sierra Nevada Mountains
July 21, 2014 10:17 pm
Hello!
I found this guy on a dry rock in a small stream in the far northern Sierra Nevada mountain range. One of my friends said it looked like a “cross between a bee and a long horned beetle.” then he quipped that was not possible. I was surprised as he is hard to stump!
Signature: S. Dykstra

Lion Beetle

Lion Beetle

Dear S. Dykstra,
When we first received some excellent images of a Lion Beetle,
Ulochaetes leoninus, in 2009, we were quite confused and amazed ourselves.  BugGuide now has many more images of this unusual Cerambycid, but there is still no information posted on the Info page.  According to the Introduction to California Beetles by Arthur V. Evans & James N. Hogue:  “The Lion Beetle … looks and behaves just like a bumblebee, even attempting to sting with its ovipositor.  When disturbed, the Lion Beetle raises its abdomen forward over its back while flapping its wings, reinforcing its bee-like appearance.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black and Orange Beetle
Location: South Central, PA
July 20, 2014 6:46 pm
I found this beetle in my orchard. He is about the size of a June bug. I have not seen a bug like this before and wonder if my orchard is in danger. I have not been able to find what he is. Even after searching through this site.
Signature: Jeremy

Burying Beetle

Burying Beetle

Hi Jeremy,
This is a Burying Beetle or Sexton Beetle in the genus Nicrophorus, and its presence probably indicates that there is a small, dead animal carcass nearby.  Burying Beetles bury small animals like birds, mice, snakes and lizards after laying eggs on the carcass.  They will not harm your orchard.  You can read more about Burying Beetles on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dull green (beetle?) with spots
Location: Montreal, QC
July 20, 2014 4:13 pm
Hello, we were intrigued by this bug spotted on our cedar tree. We wondered what it might be. It’s about an inch long, it’s a dull olive green and has four faint black spots.
We think it’s a beetle because of the elytra?
Cheers and thank you!
Signature: Snowpea

Longicorn

Linden Borer

Dear Snowpea,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle or Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae.  We will attempt to determine a species for you.

Longicorn

Linden Borer

Eric Eaton provides an identification:  Linden Borer
Hi, Daniel:
Sure, this is a “Linden Borer,” Saperda vestita.  Nice beetle!
Eric

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ash borer?
Location: Cook County, IL
July 20, 2014 8:34 am
Hi bugmen and bugwomen,
I took this photo of an insect sunning itself on the side of my house. I searched your files and online.
the closest I could narrow the ID was to the BANDED ASH BORER beetle, but all the photos I found lacked yellow stripes across the thorax. Otherwise, it seems to be a close match.
is this a banded ash borer, or perhaps a relative?
We have been losing trees in the Chicagoland (IL) area at an alarming pace. (mostly elms and ash), and work crews were in my neighborhood felling diseased trees last week.
My guess is this bug is in the process or relocating to new food source.
Many thanks for all you do.
Signature: Jill A

Neoclytus scutellaris

Neoclytus scutellaris

Dear Jill,
You are quite astute to observe the similarities between your insect and the Banded Ash Borer,
Neoclytus caprea, since they are in the same genus.  According to BugGuide, there are 25 members in the genus Neoclytus in North America, and many look quite similar, probably requiring the actual examination of the specimen by an expert in the family Cerambycidae to determine the actual identity.  Based on the striping pattern on the thorax and head, we believe your individual is Neoclytus scutellaris, based on its similarity to this individual posted to BugGuide.  The species has no common name, and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed in sapwood of (dead?) oaks, hickories, also grape.”  It is also worth noting that adults do not feed on wood, and they are most commonly found taking nectar from flowers, sap, fruit and other sweet substances.

Thank you for your response and reassurance! (I’m so glad this bug didn’t go on to feast on my elm tree). We have lots of native berry trees in our yard, and the bug was near our cherry tree when the photo was taken. Your description of it’s feeding habits makes sense.
Thanks, Jill

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: assassin bug eating japanese beetle
Location: Hermann, Missouri
July 19, 2014 4:09 pm
stopped to close a gate and saw this. took about 30 pics in order to get one that was decent. sending in high rez. makes me really really happy that there are natural predators to the dang japanese beetles. not nearly enough of them, but still….
Signature: c. millard

Wheel Bug eats Japanese Beetle

Wheel Bug eats Japanese Beetle

Dear c. millard,
Thank you so much for sending in your excellent image of a Wheel Bug feeding on a Japanese Beetle, and we are certain it will warm the collective hearts of gardeners in the eastern portions of North America where the invasive, exotic Japanese Beetle feeds on hundreds of different ornamental garden plants and food crops.  According to our sources, Japanese Beetles were not a big problem in Ohio in 2014.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination