Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Colorful beetle
Location: Chubut Province, Argentina
December 19, 2014 8:51 pm
While traveling in Patagonia near the Valdes Peninsula we saw this truly beautiful bug. The picture was taken in mid-November. We were close to the Atlantic Ocean. I have looked through the web trying to identify. I hope you may have an answer. Thank you,
Signature: Homer Shell

Unknown Beetle

Lady Beetle

Dear Homer,
This is sure a colorful and distinctive looking beetle.  Our first inclination is to speculate it is a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae.  We will attempt a more specific identification and we hope to get some assistance from our readership.

Lady Beetle identification courtesy of Karl
Hi Daniel and Homer Shell:
Although it really doesn’t look like one, this is actually a Lady Beetle (a.k.a. Ladybug or Ladybird). The species is Eriopis connexa (Coccinellidae: Coccinellinae) and it is one of the most wide spread beetles in South America. Like most Lady beetles, it is a voracious predator of aphids and is widely used for biological control of pests on crops such as maize and sorghum.
lRegards.  Karl

Thanks very much to Daniel and Karl for the ID.  You were a great help.
Homer Shell

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Subject: whats that bug
Location: brisdane moggil
December 18, 2014 3:28 pm
have not been able to identify these insects I took these photos myself please help.
Signature: cheers dylan

Leaf Beetle Larva

Leaf Beetle Larva

Dear Dylan,
We received your submission with three unrelated insects attached to a single, very brief identification request.  Before we could even begin, we needed to research the location of “brisdane moggil” which we quickly learned was a spelling error of Brisbane Moggil, an area in Queensland Australia.  We try to the best of our ability to classify postings correctly on our site and information on the sighting is often very helpful.  With that stated, one of your images is of a Leaf Beetle Larva.  If you want any additional identifications, please submit a single individual, but you may attach as many as three images of that individual as sometimes multiple views assist in our identification process.  Please include any relevant anecdotal information regarding the sighting.

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Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Subject: Gibbifer gibbosus?
Location: La Estrella, Antioquia, Colombia
December 17, 2014 9:39 am
I found this beautiful beetle walking over a fungus, near Medellin, Colombia, at about 1700 m over the sea level. So I think it could be a “pleasing fungus beetle”, but I only find references of this species in Central American countries.
During my search in internet, I also found the latin word “gibbosus” that means “humpback”. It seems to be clearly the case of this beetle.
Signature: luchogu

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Dear luchogu,
Your images of a Pleasing Fungus Beetle on its namesake food are spectacular, but they took us so long to format for the web that we don’t have the after final energy to research their identity, but we believe the genus
Gibbifer is correct.
It’s a new day and we are linking to a Costa Rican Pleasing Fungus Beetle submission from earlier in the year that might be
Gibbifer gibbosus, but we were never able to substantiate that identification.  Insetologia from Brazil has an image of a Pleasing Fungus Beetle that look identical to your individual that is identified as being in the genus Cypherotylus, a name we cited as obsolete in a posting from our archivesFlickR includes an image of a Pleasing Fungus Beetle in the genus Gibbifer, but it looks nothing like your individual.  A search for Gibbifer led us to another FlickR image from Peru that looks similar to your individual, but it is only identified to the genus level.

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

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Subject: Slug Caterpillar?
Location: Taiwan
December 16, 2014 7:13 am
I found this little creature 2 days ago, sitting quietly on a leaf in a park just outside of Taipei, Taiwan. It’s about one centimeter long, and it wasn’t moving; just sitting there minding its own business. A quick image search shows “slug moth” as a possible candidate, but I couldn’t find anything quite like it. Any ideas? Many thanks! :)
Signature: Robert

Leaf Beetle Larva, we believe

Leaf Beetle Larva, we believe

Dear Robert,
In our opinion, this is most likely a Leaf Beetle Larva, probably a Tortoise Beetle Larva in the subfamily Cassidinae and not a Slug Moth Caterpillar.
  It looks similar to this individual from Belize from FlickR as well as this individual from our archives.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for identifying my photo as belonging to a Tortoise Beetle larva! I think you were spot on, as I took the photo only 2 minutes after I photographed a Mottled Tortoise Beetle only a meter away. The larva is so eye-catching that I didn’t make the connection, but now I can clearly see that the black markings on the adult beetle wings mirror the black markings on the larva. I’ve attached photos that I took of each.
Kind regards,
Robert

Tortoise Beetle

Tortoise Beetle

Dear Robert,
Thanks so much for the update.  We cannot say for certain that the Tortoise Beetle and the larva are the same species, but their proximity to one another is a stronger indication than the similarity in the markings as adults often differ drastically in appearance from the larvae.

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Subject: What’s this beetle?
Location: City limits of Atascadero, California, 93422
December 16, 2014 12:23 am
Hello,
I have never seen a beetle like this in all my life living in California.
My cat found it on our porch during a rain storm in the early evening today (12/15/14).
It looked about 1 inch x 1.5 inch in size and had a reddish shiny color to it’s back.
It wasn’t “aggressive” but acted rather sluggish when the cat was playing with it. It did not try to fly off.
Can you identify this beetle?
Thanks!
Signature: Maria

Rain Beetle

Female Rain Beetle

Our Automated Response:  Thank you for submitting your identification request.
Please understand that we have a very small staff that does this as a labor of love. We cannot answer all submissions (not by a long shot). But we’ll do the best we can!

Hello,
I have since identified the beetle in the pictures that I submitted to your website.  It is a female Rain Beetle (Pleocoma).
Thanks for all you do.
Maria Smith

Rain Beetle

Female Rain Beetle

Dear Maria,
We are happy that you identified your Rain Beetle in the family Pleocomidae.  This fascinating family is limited to the western parts of North America and they have a marvelous life cycle.  Your individual is a male.  The females are flightless and they do not leave their burrows, spending their entire lives many feet underground.  Males appear with the rains.

Correction:  Female Rain Beetle
Based on a new comment, we have learned that this is in fact a female Rain Beetle.

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Subject: Xmas Jewel

Location: Queensland, Australia.
December 14, 2014 3:36 pm
Merry Xmas guys. My first encounter at my place today with this Variable Jewel Beetle – Temognatha variabilis.
Displaying the true Aussie spirit with its green and gold colours these guys only appear around Xmas and can vary from yellow to deep red. Thanks for another great year of bugs, hope the next one is even better.
Signature: aussitrev

Variable Jewel Beetle

Variable Jewel Beetle

Happy Holidays Trevor,
We have received several beautiful related individuals in the genus
Temognatha in the past, but this is the first Variable Jewel Beetle of which we are aware in our archives.  There might be a long lost unidentified image somewhere in our extensive archive which will top 20,000 unique posts in early 2015.  As always, your lovely images and interesting information are greatly appreciated.

Variable Jewel Beetle

Variable Jewel Beetle

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination