Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that bug
Location: New Brunswick
February 3, 2016 12:06 pm
Hi I have these little bugs infesting my apartment. They are in my pantry, my floor, my closet, and around my cats food. I’m so annoyed by them and want to get rid of them.
Signature: Helppp please

Possibly Sawtooth Grain Beetles

Possibly Sawtooth Grain Beetles

These sure look like Sawtooth Grain Beetles, Oryzaephilus surinamensis, to us, though there is not enough detail to be certain.  They might also be the closely related Merchant Grain Beetle, Oryzaephilus mercator, and according to BugGuide:  “Adults and larvae feed primarily on cereal products, particularly oatmeal, bran, shelled sunflower seeds, rolled oats, and brown rice; usually associated with oilseeds and less with cereal grains and in most regions damages processed cereals, especially those with high oil content; also feeds on seed-borne fungi”  You may compare your image to the images posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: thought it would be easy
Location: coldwater ontario canada
February 1, 2016 6:35 pm
Hi we have these in our house occasionally, we think they are coming in on our firewood. The wood is ash and oak. The house is only a year old and was built in the winter
Signature: Keith Prentice

Longhorned Borer Beetle:  Sarosesthes fulminans

Longhorned Borer Beetle: Sarosesthes fulminans

Dear Keith,
We turned to our copy of Arthur V. Evans excellent book “Beetles of Eastern North America” as it is easier to scan than many online sources.  We believe we have correctly identified your Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae as
Sarosesthes fulminans which is described as having:  “a distinctive eyespot on the pronotum and angulate bands on elytra.  Larvae tunnel under bark and in sapwood of hardwoods, especially chestnut (Castanea), oak (Quercus), and walnut (Juglans).  Adults are attracted to light and bait traps in late spring and summer.  Quebec and Ontario to North Carolina, west to Minnesota, Iowa, and Kansas.”  This image from BugGuide looks very much like your individual.  You are most likely correct that your indoor, winter sighting is related to oak firewood.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: This flew into my shirt
Location: Nevada, Texas
February 2, 2016 10:17 am
Hi, I’d like to identify this little guy for peace of mind – he was in my baby’s play room (and inside my shirt) and I’d like to know that he wasn’t poisonous. I threw him unceremoniously outside.
Signature: Jessica

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Jessica,
There is not enough detail in your image to identify this beyond the family level.  This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and it is not venomous.  Members of this family spend their larval stage boring in wood, and they need strong mandibles to chew their way to the surface after maturity, so they are capable of delivering a painful, but not generally dangerous bite.  Large individual might even draw blood.  Individual found indoors frequently emerge from firewood that was brought inside.  They will not infest the wood used in the construction of a home, so they pose no threat to your home.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I’m not sure what type of bug this is
Location: Albuquerque NM
January 30, 2016 8:10 pm
Acouple of days ago I lift the door open while letting in some cool air, and I didn’t really pay attention and make sure no bugs came in. Then just recently I noticed this bug and I think it looks like a cockroach, it has antennas and has 3 legs on each side with patterns on the back.
Signature: Thanks for the help in advance

Mesquite Borer

Mesquite Borer

This is not a Cockroach.  It is a Mesquite Borer, Placosternus difficilis, a beetle in the Longhorned Borer Beetle family Cerambycidae.  According to BugGuide:  “Larval hosts: Prosopis, Acacia, Pithecellobium, Platanus, Citrus, Leucaena” and “Adults are active day and night, running rapidly along freshly cut branches of their host plants and feeding on the blossoms of Koeberlinia, Acacia, Baccharis, Bumelia, Clematis, and Solidago.”  BugGuide also notes:  “Adults come to lights and bait.”  So, we surmise that either you had firewood from one of the host plants in your house and this beetle emerged from the wood after metamorphosis, or you have at least one host plant growing in your yard or nearby and that the beetle was attracted to the light emanating from the open window.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Whats that bug?
Location: Israel
January 29, 2016 9:39 am
Hi,
Can you help me identify this one?
You might have to zoom in the photo, but that’s the best I’ve got.
Hope you can help!
Thanks,
Signature: NZ

Fruit Chafer

Fruit Chafer

Dear NZ,
Luckily there is a relatively robust network of folks in Israel who are interested in insects.  We learned the identity of your Fruit Chafer,
Tropinota vittula, thanks to the Scarabs of the Levant site where it states:  “The Cetoniinae are popularly called fruit and flower chafers, flower beetles and flower scarabs. Many species are diurnal and visit flowers for pollen and nectar, or to browse on the petals. Some species also take fruit few are termitophil.”   There are additional images on Israel’s Nature Site, but alas, we do not read Hebrew.  There are also images on Al’s Photo Page and a scholarly article entitled Tropinota vittula is a Good Species may provide you with additional information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug in Seville Spain
Location: Seville, Spain in town center
January 27, 2016 9:41 am
Hi, Moose (the name I have given him) has been hanging out on my terrace for a week or so. He is about 1 inch long, green , sometimes brown, with large eyes and a proboscis. I have never seen him fly. I don’t generally like insects, but he’s cute, with his moose-like nose. Here’s a couple of pics. Thanks for your help!
Signature: Kathleen

Weevil: Lixus angustatus

Weevil: Lixus angustatus

Dear Kathleen,
Moose is a beetle known as a Weevil.  We believe we have properly identified Moose as
Lixus angustatus by first finding an image on Visual Photos and then cross checking that identification on Iberia Nature.  Information en Español can be found on Granada Natural.

Thank you Daniel for such a quick response!  I will check it out and see if I can help him with food and such.
Thanks again and have a blessed day!
Kathleen

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination