Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
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Subject: Unknown Insect! :D
Location: Binnaguri,West Bengal
April 15, 2014 3:42 am
It was attracted to the lights……though i dn’t knw if it’s a beetle or something else!
Signature: Martin

Mango Stem Borer

Mango Stem Borer

Hi Martin,
This appears to be a Mango Stem Borer,
Batocera rufomaculata, a species that is considered a serious agricultural pest of mangos, figs and several other commercially grown trees.  According to Carnivora, the hosts include:  “edible fig, mango, guava, jackfruit, pomegranate, apple, rubber, and walnut. In India recorded for more than 30 different host plants.”  When crops are grown commercially, there is not much diversity in the field, and when food supplies are plentiful, species that feed on those plants also proliferate.  In a forest where trees are rarely homogenous and where natural predators are also present, the balance of nature keeps things under control.  Modern agricultural methods, with large swathes of land devoted to growing a single crop, create an ecosystem that is out of balance.  This individual may have been attracted to the lights in your home.

Mango Stem Borer

Mango Stem Borer

 

 

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Subject: A fuzzy scarab?
Location: Hudson, Florida
April 14, 2014 7:28 pm
This one was interesting! It was very sleepy when we found it and not very interested in going back outside. Haha. We tried to research what it could be and narrowed it to some kind of scarab but we were lost after that point. Any ideas?
Signature: Madde and Michaela

Scarab Beetle

Scarab Beetle

Hi Madde and Michaela,
WE agree that this fuzzy little guy is a Scarab Beetle, but we have not had any luck identifying the species on BugGuide either.  We will try to get some assistance in this identification.

Scarab

Scarab

Update:  We just approved a comment suggesting this might be a Bumble Bee Scarab in the family Glaphyridae, and we had considered that possibility, but we thought it didn’t look exactly like the individuals posted on BugGuide. We wrote to Eric Eaton to see if he can provide an identification.  At this time, we have not yet heard back from Eric.

Scarab

Scarab

Eric Eaton provides an broad identification
Daniel:
At least you correctly identified it as a scarab!  I was confounded by a similar beetle here in Colorado a couple years ago.
I’m pretty certain this is a May Beetle of some kind, genus Phyllophaga, but I can’t find a match in Bugguide or anywhere else, either.  I’ll see if I can get something more specific if I have permission to post the images to a Facebook group or two?
Still no word on the Dolerus sawfly swarm mystery, sorry.
Eric

 

 

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Subject: Ask What’s This Bug?
Location: Lake Balboa in Van Nuys, in the San Fernando Valley part of Los Angeles, California
April 14, 2014 8:40 am
Hi, my friends and I were at Lake Balboa in Van Nuys, in the San Fernando Valley part of Los Angeles, California. We thought we were taking photos of an orange ladybug. But when I enlarged my shot, I started thinking that this is like no ladybug I’ve seen. Can you tell me what kind of bug it is?
Signature: Helaine

Lady Beetle Pupa

Lady Beetle Pupa

Hi Helaine,
Your first impression was actually correct.  This is the pupa of a Lady Beetle.  We are not certain which species, but we are relatively confident it is not the pupa of the invasive Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle.

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Subject: Small beetle, windowsill & baseboards
Location: Vancouver Island, BC – southern tip.
April 13, 2014 11:12 am
Hi,
I have been finding these little beetles on my windowsill in my atrium (18′ ceilings) and along the baseboards in that atrium. There is no carpet – it’ s laminate flooring. The house is only 7 years old. The atrium is our ‘dining room’ which is only used for dinner in the evenings and kept clean.
Can you please advise what the bug is – I’m assuming it’s some sort of beetle.
Signature: Thanks, Tammy

Varied Carpet Beetles

Varied Carpet Beetles

Hi Tammy,
You have Varied Carpet Beetles,
Anthrenus verbasci , currently our most common identification request with an average of five requests arriving daily.  Varied Carpet Beetles are members of the family Dermestidae, a group that contains many members that are cosmopolitan and that infest homes.  The adults, which you are finding, feed on pollen, and they are likely congregating on the window sills in an attempt to gain access to the outdoors.  The larvae are the pests that infest homes.  According to BugGuide, they are “primarily a household pest on plant (dried fruits/nuts) and animal materials; regularly encountered in dried-milk factories, occasionally in flour mills and warehouses” and they eat a “wide variety of materials of animal origin (wool, fur, skins…)(1); stored food materials and products (biscuits, cakes, seeds, wheat, maize, oats, rice, cayenne pepper, cacao, and dried cheese)”.  They are reviled in museums and BugGuide also notes they are: “arguably, world’s most important pest of insect collections.”  The best way to eliminate them from the home, in fact the only way to eliminate them from the home, is to identify the source of the infestation, the place where the larvae are feeding, and discard any food or other item that might be feeding the larvae. 

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Subject: Giant Beetle?
Location: East Texas
April 12, 2014 1:38 pm
I have never seen anything like this. It’s hard to tell from the photo, but it was more of a brownish-grey and had two spot on its back that resembled eyes or the markings of some moths.
Signature: Thanks! Megan

Eyed Elater

Eyed Elater

Hi Megan,
This is a very dark Eyed Elater, a species of Click Beetle.  Most individuals are colored in a more contrasting manner so the dark occuli or eyespots show up dramatically against the body.  The eyespots serve as a defense mechanism, fooling many predators into thinking that the succulent morsel is actually a much larger predator, like a snake.

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Subject: what is this bug?
Location: 40.5 North 0.5 East
April 10, 2014 4:49 am
Hi
I live in rural Catalunya, NE Spain, not far from the mediteranean and a mostly olive growing area.
This time of year March/April it is about 20′C max in the day flowers are out and there is blossom on the fruit trees.
These (1 to 1.5 cm) bugs are often right in the blossom. Sometimes they are very hairy and can appear yellow with the pollen.
Please can you tell me what they are and if possible, are they damaging the blossom?
In hope and with thanks
Signature: Joseph

White Spotted Rose Beetle

White Spotted Rose Beetle

Dear Joseph,
We believe we have correctly identified your Scarab as a White Spotted Rose Beetle,
Oxythyrea funesta, thanks to the Things Biological website where it states:  “Its distribution includes Italy, France, Malta, Morocco, Asia Minor and parts of the Middle East. It is not a particularly important species economically, though they can significantly impact grape vines and flowering wheat.”  According to Csalomontraps:  “The adult beetle causes damage to flowers of peark cherry, European chestnut and other spring-blossoming fruit trees and ornamental plants (e.g. peony).  It damages frequently also cereals, first of all ears of rye.  The beetle can feed also on many flowering weeds, i.e. different spp. of Compositae and Cruciferae.  The beetle chews the petals, staminae and stigmae thus rendering the flower infertile.  It can damage not only flowers in full blossom, but also in the bud stage.  The grub (larva) lives in the soil, feeds on rotting plant material, it causes no damage.”  Since that information is provided by a company that produces traps, the account might be exaggerated, but we believe you most likely have cause for concern.

White Spotted Rose Beetle

White Spotted Rose Beetle

Absolutely fantastic, thank you very much.
Now to do something to help the plants as we have hundreds of the beetles.
Again, thank you for you help as we had failed to find it in our books

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination