Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: glowworm?
Location: Missouri, USA
September 27, 2014 3:09 pm
I’m not quite sure on this one, I’m thinking it’s either a glowworm or a trilobite beetle? there’s a bit of pinkish coloring on the underside and its slow moving and calm. not too large or anything
Signature: Stolz

Firefly Larva

Firefly Larva

Dear Stolz,
Glowworms are larvae and larviform females of beetles in the family Phengodidae, and coincidentally, we just finished posting an image of a Glowworm.  Your individual is a Firefly Larva in the family Lampyridae, and though both families are known for Bioluminescence, they are distinct families, even though we have categorized them together on our site.  You can compare your image of a Firefly larva to images posted to BugGuide.

Firefly Larva

Firefly Larva

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Centipede Looking Creature
Location: Raleigh NC
September 27, 2014 11:02 am
I was out in my back yard walking around and I saw this bug crawling along on the ground. I pulled out my phone and took some pictures. Could you tell me what I saw?
Signature: Joe S.

Glowworm

Glowworm

Dear Joe,
If you had the ability to darken the surroundings, you would have had a nice surprise because this is a Glowworm or Railroad Worm.  They are bioluminescent, hence they glow at night.  Your individual is in the genus
Phenogodes, and you can get additional information on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tortoise Bug?
Location: Western Australia
September 24, 2014 12:03 pm
Hi There, We’re on the South Coast of Western Australia and found this little fella in our kitchen- it’d obviously flown in.
At first we thought it was a Ladybug/Ladybird but after some research now think it’s some kind of Tortoise Bug but don’t know for sure.
After taking a couple pics we let him go outside. :)
Signature: Jo

Tortoise Beetle

Leaf Beetle

Dear Jo,
We agree with you that this is some species of Tortoise Beetle, but we had no luck attempting to identify it to the species level.  We could not find any matching images on the Insects of Brisbane website.
  Perhaps one of our readers will have more luck.

Update:  Cesar Crash provided a comment with this FlickR link of a Leaf Beetle in the genus Paropsisterna that looks like it is correct.

Tortoise Beetle

Leaf Beetle

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fuzzy antenna beetle
Location: Lorain, Ohio
September 23, 2014 12:34 pm
I found this beetle flying around my porch. There was another one (I’m guessing female, due to its lack of fan-like antenna) sitting on the side of my house.
The back of their abdomen is orange.
It is currently early autumn.
Signature: Candice

Male Cedar Beetle

Male Cedar Beetle

Dear Candice,
We are very excited about your submission.  WE believe you have documented images of both a male and female Cedar Beetle,
Sandalus niger, an identification we verified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, they are found “Mostly: Sept-Oct” and “Larvae probably feed on Cycada nymphs. Adults very short lived.”

Female Cedar Beetle

Female Cedar Beetle

Female Cedar Beetle

Female Cedar Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of beetle is this?
Location:  Marmaris, Turkey
September 20, 2014 3:59 pm
Hi, I am on holiday in Marmaris, Turkey and woke up to find quite a large beetle on my balcony. I took many photos and was just curious to learn what type it was. I have scoured the web and can’t seem to find it anywhere. Any help?
Signature: Joshua

There is no image attached.

Yeah because your website has no email or any way of attaching photos I shall send them to you now. I was just waiting for your reply so I could do so. Thanks!  I was particularly interested to find out what if those were eggs it was carrying?

Red Palm Weevil

Red Palm Weevil

Dear Joshua,
You can send identification request with images by using our Ask What’s That Bug? link on our site.  This is a Red Palm Weevil,
Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, a species that is doing significant damage to cultivated palm trees throughout the Mediterranean region.  According to BugGuide:  “native to so. Asia and Melanesia, since the 1980s spread into many warm coastal areas around the Indian Ocean and the Mediterranean.”  The UK Food and Environment Research Agency has an excellent pdf on the Red Palm Weevil.

Red Palm Weevil with Passengers

Red Palm Weevil with Passengers

We suspect that the passengers on your Red Palm Weevil are Mites, but we don’t know if they are parasitic or if they are phoretic, meaning they use the Weevil for transportation purposes and pose no harm to the tranporter.  The Iberia-Natur site includes images of a Red Palm Weevil with mites and it includes the following statement:  “that mites are transported on the legs of the bug. This process is called phoresy, which means the temporary use of another animal (in this case a bug) for transportation to another fee lot.”  Krishna Mohan PHotography also has images of Mites on a Red Palm Weevil and the statement:  “that mites are transported on the legs of this weevil. This process is called phoresy, which means one animal attaching to another for transportation only.”

Mites on Red Palm Weevil

Close-up of Mites on Red Palm Weevil

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Nepali beetle
Location: Kathmandu valley
September 21, 2014 12:02 am
This beetle (?) was the largest I saw in Nepal. It’s about 4 inches long and had scary-looking mandibles. Taken in July.
Signature: Bug curious

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Bug Curious,
This is some species of Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and we will attempt to determine the species for you.  Beetles in this family have very powerful mandibles and large individuals might draw blood should they chomp down on a finger.

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Daniel,
thanks for the ID on this and the tiger moth. If it helps, here is a link to my a post on my blog with a short film of the beetle.
http://miakt.wordpress.com/2014/09/20/lives-of-the-monster-insects/
I posted some random photos of large insects and other creatures I saw while teaching English in a monastery outside Kathmandu. I managed to identify a couple by googling, but some I couldn’t, so thanks for your help! I will update the blog with your information.
Mia

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination