Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug
Location: East Gippsland Australia
October 23, 2014 12:44 am
Gday, sorry to bug you man. Cool bug, spring time, coastal dunes, banksia closest trees.
Signature: Aaron

Wattle Pig Weevil, we believe

Wattle Pig Weevil, we believe

Dear Aaron,
This is a Broad Nosed Weevil, and we believe we have identified it as a Wattle Pig Weevil in the genus
Leptopius thanks to the Brisbane Insect Website.  You can also find images on Project Noah.

Probably Wattle Pig Weevil

Probably Wattle Pig Weevil

Amy Gosch liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Biking Bug
Location: Tallahassee, FL
October 20, 2014 1:12 pm
Dear Bugman,
I found this bug sitting on my bike, right beside the back wheel. I had turned the bike over a few times to secure the chain on the wheel, without seeing this little guy fall off. I even tried to slightly move him over with a leaf, but this guy would NOT budge!
I continued to ride, downhill, and uphill until I reached my destination. When I locked up the bike, he (or she) had moved, but was still attached to my bicycle.
This bug had black and yellow patterns. It looks like a beetle, but I’m not entirely sure. It has a “bigger” antenna, as well as legs and feet that tend to stick and hold on to wherever they are.
Signature: Biking with a Bug

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Dear Biking with a Bug,
This looks like a Diaprepes Root Weevil, and according to Featured Creatures: “It was first reported in Florida in 1964 from a nursery near Apopka. It was presumably introduced in an ornamental plant shipment from Puerto Rico. Since 1964, Diaprepes abbreviatus has spread over a large area of central and southern Florida where it is damaging to citrus, ornamental plants, and some other crops.”

Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
False Bombardier Beetle

False Bombardier Beetle

Subject: Red and black beetle?
Location: Kentucky
October 20, 2014 8:24 pm
I found this darling after work the other day. Eveningtime, autumn weather, in the parking lot. It was about 2 inches long, see photo of it in a plastic cup. Long legged, with covered wings like a beetle, but kind of soft to the touch, not crunchy like a typical beetle shell. It was trapped in a puddle, so I dried it off and made sure it was ok before I let it go into the weeds. :)
Signature: Casey

Hi Casey,
You rescued a False Bombardier Beetle in the genus
Galerita, and you can read more about this predatory Ground Beetle on BugGuide.  We are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Unknown Beetle

Checkered Beetle

Unknown Beetle

Checkered Beetle

Subject: Borers in Oregon
Location: Josephine Co., Oregon
October 19, 2014 5:39 pm
We were splitting Madrone firewood today (10/19/14), and it was full of borers of some kind. There were two varieties. The black & green variety was the most common (probably 90%), but there were also some of the red and black. We’re interested in learning more about them, particularly whether they’re a threat to our woods.
Signature: Jim

Hi Jim,
We have not had much luck identifying your red and black beetles, but it might be partly due to the lack of clarity in the images, and that they look velvety in texture, but we are not sure if that is an illusion.  Please clarify the tomentosity of your beetle, because other than the apparent texture of your individuals,  they remind us of Pleasing Fungus Beetles which are pictured on BugGuide.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to write in with an identification.

Arthur Evans identifies Checkered Beetle
Daniel,
Just saw this post on your page. It is a clerid beetle, Chariessa elegans <http://bugguide.net/node/view/169445>.
Cheers, ART
Arthur V. Evans, D.Sc.
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Research Collaborator:  Department of Entomology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC

Dr. Art Evans, entomologist, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Longhorned Borer Beetle

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Subject: Borers in Oregon
Location: Josephine Co., Oregon
October 19, 2014 5:39 pm
We were splitting Madrone firewood today (10/19/14), and it was full of borers of some kind. There were two varieties. The black & green variety was the most common (probably 90%), but there were also some of the red and black. We’re interested in learning more about them, particularly whether they’re a threat to our woods.
Signature: Jim

Dear Jim,
We believe your Longhorned Borer might be
Neoclytus conjunctus, which is a native species found along the western portion of North America according to BugGuide.  Alas, BugGuide does not offer any specific information on the species.  We suspect it is not a cause for concern as it is a native species.  Your red and black beetle belongs to a different family and we will research its identity later.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Tortoise Beetle from Brazil

Tortoise Beetle from Brazil

Subject: Unidentified Beetle
Location: Iguacu, Brazil
October 20, 2014 5:47 am
I took this picture of an iridescent beetle at the Iguacu Falls in Brazil.
Can you please identify it.
Regards
Ina
Signature: Ian Rowlings

Dear Ian,
This is a Tortoise Beetle in the tribe Cassidini, and it is similar to this individual on Insetologia.  We located an image on FlickR of
Cyrtonota cyanea that looks like a very good match to your Tortoise Beetle.  We found an image of a mounted specimen on Cassidinae of the World, but dead specimens of Tortoise Beetles often lose their beautiful coloration.

Sabina Swift, Rachel Carpenter, Lynn Reid, Christy Harris, Jeff Lanterman, Sandra Mason Comer, Amy Gosch, Nate Klingenstein, Emma Hoyle, Maryann Struman, Kathleen Travis Perin, Timothy Steele liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination