Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beatle identification
Location: Truckee Ca
July 29, 2014 8:57 am
Was on vacation in Truckee CA and found this large beatle under a cushion for the patio chair. It was between the size of a quarter and a fifty cent piece. Slow moving and seemed to be waiting for the morning sun. A bit of a shocker!
Signature: Warrren

Yellow Douglas Fir Borer

Yellow Douglas Fir Borer

Hi Warrren,
This impressive beetle is a Yellow Douglas Fir Borer,
Centrodera spurca, and we have sporadic sightings as postings on our site.  According to the Oregon State University Insect ID Clinic site:  “This is a common long horned beetle in the west that feeds under the bark of Douglas-fir as a larva. The black spots on the sides of the beetle distinguish it from some of the other species that occur in Oregon .”

Daniel,
Thanks for the information. So this is the Beatle that we have had trouble with killing the trees.  Right?
Warren

Hi again Warren,
You dropped an “r”.  To the best of our knowledge, the Yellow Douglas Fir Borer is not considered a significant problem regarding killing trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large beetle with serious pinchers
Location: Rhode Island
July 29, 2014 6:09 pm
Hello, I live in Rhode Island and found this beetle floating in my pool. Unfortunately, it could not be saved. I’m just wondering what type of bug this is and if I should be concerned that there may be more and if they are destructive.
Thank you in advance!
Signature: Lisa

Drowned Reddish Brown Stag Beetle

Drowned Reddish Brown Stag Beetle

Hi Lisa,
Did you attempt mouth to mouth resuscitation?  This is a male Reddish Brown Stag Beetle.  Males have the more developed mandibles.  This and other Stag Beetles are not destructive, nor are they in any way detrimental to humans, their homes or their belongings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug from Honduras
Location: Roatan, Honduras
July 28, 2014 9:46 pm
Hello there!
We found this insect in Roatan, Honduras in my friend’s shower. We have spend hours online trying to identify this creature and are coming up empty. The wings on it’s head are so strange! Like long eyelashes! It also looks like the bottom might have a stinger. Please help. We are dying to know the answer.
Signature: Lynette

Male Glowworm Beetle

Male Glowworm Beetle

Hi Lynette,
This is a male Glowworm Beetle in the family Phengodidae, and you can see its resemblance to this image on BugGuide.  The wings and feathered antennae indicate this is a male.  According to BugGuide:  “Adult males have variously shortened/narrowed soft elytra, branched antennae, and bulging eyes; adult females are larviform (often all but impossible to tell from fully-grown larvae) and, like the larvae, have bioluminescent organs.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Long Horn Beetle?
Location: Massachusetts
July 28, 2014 4:35 pm
Found this outside my house and would like to know a little more about it. Bit of a Asian Longhorn beetle scare round here and I know this is not one but now my kids and I have caught the bug (pun intended) and want to know what it is.
Thanks for time!
Signature: Sean

Red Banded Pine Borer

Red Banded Pine Borer

Hi Sean,
This pretty beetle is a Red Banded Pine Borer,
Stictoleptura canadensis, and according to bugGuide:  “The normal colouration of Stictoleptura c. canadensis (Olivier) is with banded antennae (male and female). Rarely the antennae are all black.… Christopher Majka, 31 January, 2013.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug id
Location: Northern Maine
July 27, 2014 9:27 pm
Saw these getting busy on my boat trailer tire as I attempted to put air in it.
Signature: Nathan

Mating Pale Green Weevils

Mating Invasive Green Weevils

Dear Nathan,
We believe these are mating Green Immigrant Leaf Weevils,
Polydrusus sericeus, and according to BugGuide: “introduced from Europe, where it is widespread” and it feeds on “primarily Yellow Birch (Betula alleghaniensis).”  Since you image is not in critical focus, they might also be Pale Green Weevils, Polydrusus impressifrons, and they are also an invasive, introduced species.  According to BugGuide:  “native to Europe, adventive in NA (introduced ca. 1913)” though this date discrepancy information is also provided:  “earliest record in our area: NY 1906.”  Finally, BugGuide offers this comparison information with the Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil:  “P. impressifrons is similarly colored but has less conspicuous black lines in elytra, relatively small eyes positioned laterally and parallel to midline, least interocular distance 1.5 to 2 times width of eye, and elytral margins slightly sinuate and widest near apex (compare images of both species).”

Thanks for taking the time. Looks like the pale green after looking at some images. I guess it’s European bug time around here.

Originally we thought Pale Green Weevils, and then we thought the Green Immigrant Leaf Weevils were more likely.  Thanks for the confirmation.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula
Location: Marquette County, Michigan
July 28, 2014 9:16 am
Found this beetle last week on bedrock at Wetmore Pond, in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula in boreal habitat. Appears to be a longhorn or some type of sawyer?
Signature: Mike Sherman

Round Headed Apple Borer

Round Headed Apple Borer

Dear Mike,
This beautiful Longicorn is a Round Headed Apple Borer,
Saperda candida, and according to Arthur V. Evans in his new book Beetles of Eastern North America: “Larvae attack many deciduous hardwoods, including orchard and ornamental trees.”  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on the wood of apples (Malus) and related trees in the rose family, such as pear (Pyrus), hawthorn (Crataegus), mountain ash (Sorbus) and Saskatoon (Amelanchier). Also: Aronia, Cotoneaster, Cydonia, Prunus” and “These insects seek out trees which are already weakened due to some other stress. A heavy infestation can kill a tree.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination