Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Two beetles from Greece
Location: Kos, Dodecanese, Greece
April 28, 2016 7:18 am
I hope it’s OK to submit two for the price of one, but they are on the same flower! I took this while birdwatching on Kos in the Aegean a couple of days ago (i.e. April 26th). There were lots of both species around, but particularly the stripy ones whose wing-cases seem to have shrunk in the wash.
Signature: Harry R

Two Scarabs

Two Scarabs

OK, I searched your site for ‘spotted scarab’ and the black and white one is clearly some species of Oxythyrea. I’d still like to know about the other one though!
Harry

Dear Harry,
We love your twofer.  Both of your beetles are Scarab Beetles, and we agree that the smaller is a White Spotted Rose Beetle in the genus
Oxythyrea.  We believe your other Scarab may be Eulasia vittata based on this Masterfile image.  There is also a nice image on Dogalhayat.org and the image on Kaefer der Welt – Beetles of the World nicely illustrates the short elytra.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Madagascar Beetle
Location: Montagne d’Ambre, Madagascar
April 28, 2016 2:52 pm
Hi,
This is a beetle from Amber Mountain (Montagne d’Ambre) National Park in Madagascar. I would appreciate any help with identification. It was a diurnal species.
Signature: Glenn McCrea

Leaf Beetle

Leaf Beetle

Dear Glenn,
We believe this is a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae.  When we tried searching for orange Leaf Beetles from Madagascar and we found this unidentified stock image number 18955051 on Stock Photo that looks like a good match.

Leaf Beetle

Leaf Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Garden Bug ID
Location: DFW Texas
April 26, 2016 6:50 pm
Is this bug eating my garden
Signature: Thanks – Mark

Lady Beetle Larva

Lady Beetle Larva

Dear Mark,
This Lady Beetle Larva or Ladybug Larva is not eating your garden, but it is eating Aphids and other insect pest that are eating your garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What the hell is this
Location: Cambridge oh
April 25, 2016 2:00 pm
what is it. Never seen one Before
Signature: don’t care

Hickory Borer

Hickory Borer

This is a Hickory Borer.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: please identify this bug
Location: sheffield uk
April 20, 2016 1:09 am
Hi I have been finding these insects in my newly built house, and really need to know what they are and how to remove them, can u help?! Thanks
Signature: stacey

Possibly Flour Beetle

Possibly Flour Beetle

Dear Stacey,
Small beetles like this found in the home are generally either wood boring species or pantry pests.  We believe your individual is a Flour Beetle in the genus
Tribolium.  According to Pied Piper:  “Both the confused and red flour beetles, known as “bran bugs,” primarily attack milled grain products, such as flour and cereals. Both adults and larvae feed on grain dust and broken kernels, but not the undamaged whole grain kernels. These beetles often hitchhike into the home in infested flour and can multiply into large populations. Some survive on food accumulations in cabinet cracks, crevices, and furniture. Confused flour beetles are the most abundant and injurious insect pest of flour mills in the U.Kingdom, United States and Australia. They do not bite or sting humans or pets, spread disease, or feed on or damage the house or furniture.  In addition to milled grain products, beetle specimens have been found in barley, breakfast cereals, corn, cornmeal, crackers, flour, millet, oats, rice, rye, wheat and wheat bran, nutmeats, dried fruits, legume seeds, beans, milk chocolate, cottonseed, peas, powdered milk, sunflower seeds, vetch seeds, spices, herbarium and museum specimens” so you may want to check the pantry for the site of the infestation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unidentified beetle
Location: Alexandria, Virginia
April 19, 2016 6:54 pm
I got several good photos of this attractive beetle today at Huntley Meadows in Alexandria, Virginia. I cannot find it in my reference book, so I was hoping you can help me out. Thanks!
Signature: Seth

Blister Beetle: Lytta aenea

Blister Beetle: Lytta aenea

Dear Seth,
Your Blister Beetle is
Lytta aenea, and because insects have evolved and adapted to maximize their ability to reproduce, many species make yearly appearances when they emerge as adults at the same time across a wide area.  A few days ago, we posted our first image this year of Lytta aenea.

Blister Beetle: Lytta aenea

Blister Beetle: Lytta aenea

Blister Beetle: Lytta aenea

Blister Beetle: Lytta aenea

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination