Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this Bug?
Location: Hillsborough County, Florida
August 28, 2016 5:26 am
I have looked at all the black and white beetles and cannot find one that looks quite like this. It was on dog fennel in west central Florida. I would like to know what it is and if it is native. It looks like it is missing an antennae.
Thank you for this wonderful reference site.
Signature: Donna Bollenbach

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Dear Donna,
This looks to us like a Diaprepes Root Weevil,
Diaprepes abbreviatus, a species that according to BugGuide is:  “Native to the Caribbean, adventive and established in so. US: so. & central FL (1964), so. TX (Cameron & Hidalgo Cos 2000, Corpus Christi 2005, Houston 2009; map), so. CA (2005), LA (2008); further north in greenhouses.”  BugGuide also indicates it is  “highly polyphagous; larvae feed on roots, adults on foliage of citrus trees (esp. oranges in TX) and almost 300 other plant species” and “Major pest of citrus crops: larvae often girdle the taproot, which may kill the plant and provide an avenue for Phythophora infections. A single larva can kill young hosts while several larvae can cause serious decline of older, established hosts.”

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Diaprepes Root Weevil

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Nice Black Beetle
Location: Anchorage, Alaska
August 26, 2016 5:29 pm
I’ve lived in Alaska for 2 years and I’m not well acquainted with the insects here. I caught this guy ambling around in my garage. I took a photo and set it outside. What kind of beetle is this?
Signature: Sara

Ground Beetle

Ground Beetle

Dear Sara,
This is a beneficial, predatory Ground Beetle in the family Carabidae.  There are many similar looking species found in Alaska on the Carabidae of the World site, and we are not certain of your species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle orgy on goldenrod!
Location: Schenectady, NY
August 27, 2016 11:46 am
Hello WhatsThatBug,
I thought you’d enjoy this shot of no less than four pairs of mating beetles on the same goldenrod plant! There were actually at least two other pairs that I didn’t get in the shot, so clearly this plant is the place for looooove. I think they are Goldenrod Soldier Beetles.
I spotted them at a local park that has a perfect pond for dragonflies. This stand of goldenrod grows alongside a tiny stream that runs through the grass in an open area, and as you can imagine it is a very popular spot for all kinds of insects, including a huge variety of bees and wasps. I’ll need to go back with extra batteries in my camera to see what else I can photograph!
Signature: Susan B.

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

Dear Susan,
Your lurid images of mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles,
Chauliognathus pensylvanicus, are a wonderful addition to our Bug Love tag.  Many years ago we created a Milkweed Meadow tag because there is such a diverse group of insects, including the Monarch Butterfly, that depend upon milkweed for survival, and there are many other insects that are attracted to the nectar rich blossoms.  At that time, we had planned a companion plant community tag called the Goldenrod Meadow because similar to milkweed, goldenrod is also associated with a very diverse insect community.  We are taking the opportunity to launch our Goldenrod Meadow tag with your wonderful submission, and now we will have to go back through our archives to tag appropriate postings from the past.  When you return to the goldenrod patch with extra batteries, please send us any images that you feel will be of interest to our readership. 

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Afghan Beetle
Location: Bagram, Afghanistan
August 23, 2016 4:06 pm
Hey. I wondered if you could tell me what this bug was that I caught crawling past my feet in the office when I had no shoes on! I’m sure he means no harm but didn’t want any nasty surprises crawling up my leg so I caught him anyway. I’ve let him go outside now though but still wondering what he was as he looks quite cool!
Signature: Dean, AFG

Ground Beetle: Pheropsophus catoirei

Bombardier Beetle: Pheropsophus catoirei

Dear Dean,
Your pretty beetle is a Ground Beetle in the family Carabidae, and we believe we have correctly identified it as
Pheropsophus catoirei, a member of the subfamily Brachininae according to the Carabidae of the World site.  According to BugGuide, Brachininae is the subfamily that includes Bombardier Beetles, a group that have chemical defenses explained on BugGuide as:  “Adults have chemical defenses, ejecting toxic, foul-smelling gases from their abdomen with a loud popping sound. The explosive brew is composed of hydrogen peroxide, hydroquinone, and catalytic enzymes.”  A very similar looking beetle is pictured on RevolvY where it states:  “Bombardier beetles are ground beetles (Carabidae) in the tribes Brachinini, Paussini, Ozaenini, or Metriini—more than 500 species altogether—which are most notable for the defense mechanism that gives them their name: when disturbed, they eject a hot noxious chemical spray from the tip of their abdomen with a popping sound.  The spray is produced from a reaction between two chemical compounds, hydroquinone and hydrogen peroxide, which are stored in two reservoirs in the beetle’s abdomen. When the aqueous solution of hydroquinones and hydrogen peroxide reaches the vestibule, catalysts facilitate the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide and the oxidation of the hydroquinone.[1] Heat from the reaction brings the mixture to near the boiling point of water and produces gas that drives the ejection. The damage caused can be fatal to attacking insects. Some bombardier beetles can direct the spray over a wide range of directions.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown beetle
Location: Warsash, England
August 24, 2016 11:15 am
Found this beauty in our back garden today, in Warsash on the south coast of England. It was very hot here today and he appeared to be resting in the shade. Can’t find him in our Beetle books!
Many thanks
Signature: Tracy Dukes

Sun Beetle:  Pachnoda marginata

Sun Beetle: Pachnoda marginata

Dear Tracy,
Our first impression proved correct:  This is not a native species in England.  We believe we have correctly identified your Scarab Beetle as a Sun Beetle,
Pachnoda marginata, a species that according to Shutterstock is:  “a beetle from the subfamily Cetoniinae (Scarabaeidae) that lives in west and central Africa. They are used as food for terrarium animals.”  Perhaps this individual escaped from someone who is raising them in captivity.  According to BioLib, it is a Congo Chafer.  According to the Global Biodiversity Information Facility:  “Pachnoda marginata is a beetle from the subfamily Cetoniinae with a large number of subspecies that lives in west and central Africa.  They are sometimes used as food for terrarium animals.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: Southwest Oregon
August 22, 2016 8:10 pm
I was hiking up Mt Mcloughlin Oregon and this attractive little bugger copped a ride. After he was kind enough to pose, he flew away, I can not find any information on this fella. Could you help?
Signature: Happy Hiker

Heart Beetle

Heart Beetle

Dear Happy Hiker,
It did not take us too long to identify your Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae as
Pachyta armata, but alas, BugGuide has no information on the species.  A comment by Gary Griswold on a BugGuide posting states:  ” in the Pacific Northwest we call them heart beetles. Assocated with high alpine enviroment….”  Other than finding some additional images online, we have not had any success in locating any species specific information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination