Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Goldsmith
Location: Maine
May 28, 2016 3:19 am
I found this bug that I believe to be a goldsmith bug on my screen. It stayed there quite a while so I pulled it off. It appeared to be dead. When I was taking pictures of it, I thought I may have seen his legs move some. Do these bugs typically not move much or do you think this bug is dead or dying? Can you identify some of the parts? Does it bite or pinch at all?
Thanks
Gs
Ps: coincidentally last nights jeopardy final was re Poe’s The Gold Bug.
Signature: Gs

Goldsmith Beetle

Goldsmith Beetle

Dear Gs,
How interesting that this sighting of a Goldsmith Beetle coincided with the Jeopardy final regarding Poe’s classic The Gold Bug which was allegedly based on a Goldsmith Beetle.  It is difficult to speculate on the cause of your individual’s inactivity.  Temperature may have been a factor.  We suspect you found this Goldsmith Beetle on your screen because it was attracted to light.  According to BugGuide:  “Occasionally attracted to lights.”  It is also possible that this individual was nearing the end of its life, hence its lethargy, and we would not rule out that its life may have ended because of exposure to toxins or poisons.  Normally, Scarab Beetles are not as active as Ground Beetles, but the behavior you describe does not sound like the behavior we would expect from a healthy Goldsmith Beetle.  It is possible that a person handling a Goldsmith Beetle may experience a slight pinch because of the spiny features on the legs.

Goldsmith Beetle

Goldsmith Beetle

Goldsmith Beetle

Goldsmith Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Love – American Carrion Beetle
Location: Southwest Indiana
May 26, 2016 8:17 pm
Hello! I wanted to share some photos I took last summer of a pair of American Carrion Beetles with their mites. They were collected around some cat vomit…which might have had some mouse remains in it. (oh so pleasant!) Somehow the photo was forgotten until now – probably because I had embarrassment over taking bug love photos, ha ha!
Thank you for the awesome site. It’s my go-to place when I find a new bug, and I’ve never had to ask for identification – I always find what I’m looking for! We practice organic gardening on our little homestead, and I often find new creatures – so I visit your site often!
Thanks again!
Signature: Heather

Mating Carrion Beetles and Phoretic Mites

Mating Carrion Beetles and Phoretic Mites

Dear Heather,
We are so thrilled to find out that you find our site so helpful.  We are also thrilled to post your images of a pair of mating American Carrion Beetles and their Phoretic Mites.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Six -legged gray bug with orangey spots
Location: Piedmont/upstate area of South Carolina – in my yard
May 25, 2016 5:59 pm
Dear Bugman,
I am trying to learn the different garden variety bugs and which ones are beneficial and which ones need to find other living (or not) arrangements.
I don’t indiscriminately destroy any bugs; but I learned my lesson to at least contain unknown ones, even if only long enough to I.D. them.
Last year I found the coolest bug ever in my garden on my tomato plant; however, by the time I could look it up and discover what this beautiful creature was, he had already camouflaged himself! So, one huge green horned tomato worm got a reprieve from instant and permanent eviction.
The attached photo was taken in my front yard while I was trying to identify some plants and came across these guys. I still do not know what the plant is, but there were several ladybugs around too. I only saw three of these gray-orangey spotted critters. The picture of the rolled up one is the bug’s reaction to being surprised. (No gray orangey spotted critter was harmed in the making of these pics)
I hope you can help.
Signature: It’s really buggin me- Dawn

Convergent Lady Beetle Larva

Convergent Lady Beetle Larva

Dear Dawn,
One of the reasons you found nearby Ladybugs is that this is the larva of a Convergent Lady Beetle,
Hippodamia convergens, a species we identified on the University of Kentucky Entomology site and then verified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, they feed upon “Aphids, also whiteflies and other soft bodied insects” that are considered agricultural pests, hence the Convergent Lady Beetle is available through “commercial sales for biological control.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Larger than a Boxelder
Location: Mound, MN
May 25, 2016 7:00 am
Dear Bugman,
This largeish black bug, with orange and black legs, and a hard black shell, with silvery fur on his belly was trapped between my screen and door last night. I’ve never seen one before. We live in Minnesota and have a garden and 3 dogs. Wondering what it is, and if it’s toxic to pets if eaten by curious and non-discriminating terriers.
Thank you.
Signature: Melanie Bisson

Blister Beetle we believe

Blister Beetle we believe

Dear Melanie,
It is difficult for us to be certain because of the odd camera angle, but we believe this is a Blister Beetle in the family Meloidae, possibly
Lytta aenea, which is pictured on BugGuide.  Many species of Blister Beetles are able to secrete a compound known as cantharidin that may cause blistering in humans.  We have read reports of livestock being poisoned by ingesting Blister Beetles with hay.  According to Pet MD:  “Blister beetles are a type of insect found primarily in the southwest and Midwest regions of the United States. These beetles harbor a very powerful toxin called cantharidin, but, unlike other types of insects, it does not spread this toxin through biting. Adult blister beetles feed on alfalfa flowers and crops, the same crops used for horse and cattle feed, and when the crops are harvested the beetles are often killed in the process, contaminating the crops with their body parts and fluids and causing illness in the horses that eat the contaminated feed.   Blister beetles are extremely toxic when ingested by horses: as few as five to ten beetles may be fatal to a horse.  The cantharidin toxin affects many bodily systems.  It is extremely irritating to the digestive tract and causes blisters and erosions from the lips and tongue all the way through to the lining of the intestines, which causes abdominal pain (colic) and diarrhea.  This toxin also causes damage to the kidneys and the heart.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle identification
Location: Plymouth MA
May 25, 2016 5:06 am
Hello. We saw this beetle in our yard and have never seen this in our area before. Do you know what this is? We live in Plymouth MA. We just found this the other day
Thank you
Signature: Marianne Benevides

Female Rainbow Scarab

Female Rainbow Scarab

Dear Marianne,
This is a female Rainbow Scarab,
Phanaeus vindex, a species of Dung Beetle.  Male Rainbow Scarabs have a prominent horn.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug on hibiscus
Location: Plant city, fl
May 25, 2016 6:44 am
I saw this bug on a winter hibiscus flower. Please help identify.
Signature: Jackke

Weevil and Aphids

Weevil and Aphids

Dear Jackke,
The larger insect in your image is a Weevil, and there are numerous smaller Aphids visible as well.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination