Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect Identification
Location: Oklahoma, USA
September 24, 2016 11:51 pm
My son has these in his garden. What are they?
Signature: BPWO

Larva of a Caterpillar Hunter

Larva of a Caterpillar Hunter

Dear BPWO,
This is the larva of a Caterpillar Hunter, a Ground Beetle in the genus
Calosoma.  Many times immature insects have a different diet than the adults, but not so with the Caterpillar Hunters.  Both larvae and adults ravenously feed on Caterpillars.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this beetle?
Location: Rocky Moutains (8,000 ft)
September 22, 2016 11:41 am
Moved a board this spring that was near a creek in Estes Park, CO and found this beetle underneath it. The soil was moist and it kept trying to crawl under debris around it. The picture is pretty good I think and I am curious as to what it is and if I should avoid them.
Thanks!
Signature: Ian Taylor

Tomentose Burying Beetle

Tomentose Burying Beetle

Dear Ian,
We have determined that because of the “dense yellow hair on pronotum” which BugGuide refers to as  “distinctive,” your Sexton Beetle is a Tomentose Burying Beetle,
Nicrophorus tomentosus.  Though most Sexton Beetles work in pairs to bury small, dead animals like mice or birds after laying eggs upon the carcass, according to BugGuide:  “unlike other nearctic Nicrophorus, adults do not bury the carcass but make a shallow pit and cover the carcass with litter.”  If you look closely at the head of your beetle, you will see that it is carrying a Phoretic Mite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown insect attacking butterfly
Location: Forest Road 22 at Brice Creek east of Cottage Grove, Oregon
September 22, 2016 3:39 pm
Taking pictures of a Clodius Parnassian butterfly when I saw some winged insect attempting to land on the butterfly’s abdomen. I shooed it away from the butterfly. Later when I was checking my photos I found that I had actually snapped it while it was just about to land on the butterfly. The closest I could come to a partial ID is some kind of carpenter ant. Just don’t know if the size is a match and it is actually something else.
Signature: G Price

Parnassus Butterfly and Beetle

Parnassus Butterfly and Beetle

Dear G Price,
This is some species of Beetle, probably a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae.  Unfortunately, there is not enough detail for us to determine a species.  We do not think it is attaching this lovely Clodius Parnassian, but rather, more of an accidental encounter.  We have so few examples of Parnassian Butterflies on our site.

Thanks for the tip.  Maybe next year I’ll be able to get a better
capture of it when I’m in the area again.   Feel free to add the
Parnassian to your group if you’d like.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Shiny bluish anty thing?
Location: Maine
September 24, 2016 4:17 am
Found this crawling on the steps, probably about 1 1/2″ – 2″ long. It wasn’t moving very fast. The abdomen is very large, but in all other respects it looks ant-like to me. Do you recognize it?
Signature: Kai

Oil Beetle

Oil Beetle

Dear Kai,
This distinctive Blister Beetle is an Oil Beetle in the genus
Meloe.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Gray flying bug with stinger
Location: Wilmington NC USA
September 21, 2016 5:52 pm
I live in Wilmington North Carolina and saw this bug in mid September at night.
Signature: Sincerely

Longicorn

Lesser Pine Borer

This is a female Lesser Pine Borer, Acanthocinus nodosus, which we identified thanks to an image in “Beetles of Eastern North America” by Arthur V. Evans, and we verified that identification with this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Medium-sized longhorn beetle, gray with distinctive pattern. Long antennae in both genders, but males have a tuft of hair on the fourth segment (see photo above) and significantly longer antennae than the females. Female has pygidium modified into a tube for ovipositing.”  So, what you thought was a stinger is actually the pygidium that is used by the female to lay eggs.

Awesome!! Thanks so much!!  Now I can brag to my fellow firefighters that I knew what that was!!
Thanks again!
Mike

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Numerous insects needed identifying for Doe
Location: Scotland
September 20, 2016 1:22 pm
Hello, I am presenting a Doe Presentation on Thursday and need to know the name of some of the insects we saw on our expidition.
Signature: Faithfully?

Longicorn:  Rhagium bifasciatum

Two Banded Longicorn: Rhagium bifasciatum

Dear Faithfully?,
What is a Doe Presentation?  Your third image is of a Two Banded Longicorn that we identified as
Rhagium bifasciatum on FlickR.  Your first image is a Millipede and your other image is too blurry to identify.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination