Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
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Subject: Need help with coleoptera i.d.
Location: southeastern Quebec
August 26, 2015 3:59 pm
Hello there,
We live on a wooded property in southeastern Quebec . We found this beautiful creature on the steps behind our house. He/she was dead, a bit flattened, so we presume one of us had inadvertently squished the poor thing.
Could you help us identify it ? Coleopteran of some sort, as far as I can determine. Thank you so much for your help.
Signature: Anke

Sugar Maple Borer

Sugar Maple Borer

Dear Anke,
Your beautiful beetle is a Sugar Maple Borer,
Glycobius speciosus, and according to BugGuide, they are considered “rare” and because of the bold markings “Appears to be a mimic of Yellowjackets.”

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Subject: Bug project
Location: Wisconsin
August 25, 2015 1:29 pm
Hi there! My name is Jada and I am a highschool student in Wisconsin, for a summer project we had to collect and identify 25 insects and I am having trouble finding the name and classification for these three bugs, it would be great if you could help me out! If not that’s totally fine!
Signature: Thanks! Jada

Placid Stag Beetle image captured January 8, 2015

Placid Stag Beetle image captured January 8, 2015

Dear Jada,
We do have a policy that you should know about, but your communication is very polite and by our accounts, you should have already identified 22 insects for your project as you are only requesting assistance with three.  We will provide you with an identity for one and we will give you categories for the other two.
Were we your teacher, the first thing we would ask is “How could an image dated January 8, 2015 have been visually collected this summer?”  This is a female Stag Beetle in the genus
Lucanus, and after browsing BugGuide, we determined it to be a female Lucanus placidus based on the BugGuide description:  “Similar to L. capreolus, but much darker, elytra more punctate. Legs dark reddish brown, no light brown patches as in capreolus.”  Male Stag Beetles have much larger mandibles.  See this BugGuide image for comparison.  We are going to unofficially call this a Placid Stag Beetle based on the BugGuide definition:  “placidus – Latin for ‘smooth, pleasing.'”  Your other images are of a beetle and a true bug.  You can peruse our own archives or check BugGuide for the remaining two images.

stag_female_jada_cu

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Subject: beetle?
Location: The Netherlands
August 26, 2015 8:56 am
Hi,
I am in The Netherlands (europe) and came across this bug. I have never seen it before and was a lot bigger then what I normally see crawling around.
It looks like a bug with a tough shell. Though when he found me a threat, he lifted his backside up as a scorpion and faced me. I have never seen a beetle do that, so it might just be something else entirely.
I am amazed and in awe since I never seen it, while I am always looking around for bugs haha. I find them very interesting. I hope you can help me out!
Thanks,
Signature: Niels

Devil's Coach Horse

Devil’s Coach Horse

Dear Niels,
We are very excited to be able to post an image of a Devil’s Coach Horse, a species of Rove Beetle, from its native habitat.  Most of our images are from North America because this species was introduced and it has naturalized.  We encourage Devil’s Coach Horses in our own garden as they are one of the few creatures that will feed on introduced Snails and Slugs, also from Europe.  Though the Devil’s Coach Horse rears up its abdomen in a threat position, and it will release a foul odor from scent glands, it is a harmless species that poses no threat to humans.

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Subject: whats this bug
Location: east hardwick vt
August 24, 2015 8:34 pm
This bug was found climbing up the string attatched to my outside light. Has been a very warm day and inly moved when wind blows did not move when we pulled the string to shut off the light
Signature: thank you sarah

Whitespotted Sawyer

Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear Sarah,
This sure looks like a Whitespotted Sawyer,
Monochamus scutellatus, to us.  According to BugGuide:  “Two-year life cycle. Larvae excavates galleries in coniferous trees, often after they are damaged by a fire, storm, etc. Common hosts are: Balsam fir, spruces and white pine.”

Whitespotted Sawyer

Whitespotted Sawyer

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Subject: Yellow & Black Bug
Location: Cloquet, MN
August 22, 2015 5:06 pm
This was seen today, August 22 in central Minnesota near the St. Louis River. The area is rocky, sandy and has a lot of weeds. It was crawling on a rock and in an effort to get a clear picture, accidentally turned it over. The abdomen had black and yellow striped coloring like a wasp. Unfortunately, I didn’t get a picture of that, but did get these two photos. It is heading towards the southeast corner of the picture. It is 1/2 – 3/4″ long.
Signature: Squeamish Bug Lover

Goldenrod Soldier Beetle

Goldenrod Soldier Beetle

Dear Squeamish Bug Lover,
This is a Goldenrod Soldier Beetle, and now that summer is approaching its end, fall is almost upon us and the goldenrod is beginning to bloom, we expect submissions of Goldenrod Soldier Beetles to increase.

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Subject: What is this bug
Location: Northern Illinois, USA
August 23, 2015 2:06 pm
What’s this bug?
Signature: Jbmanz

Goldenrod Soldier Beetle

Goldenrod Soldier Beetle

This is a Goldenrod Soldier Beetle.

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