Currently viewing the category: "Honey Bees"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Assassin bug?
Location: Beavercreek, OH
August 24, 2015 3:18 am
This bug landed at our table at our local pool. It was carrying a bee & sat there for a few minutes with it’s stinger in the bees head feeding on it.
Signature: Kerry

Hanging Thief eats Robber Fly

Hanging Thief eats Robber Fly

Dear Kerry,
This is not an Assassin Bug.  It is a Robber Fly in the genus
Diogmites, a group known as the Hanging Thieves because they often hang from one leg while feeding.  They take prey on the wing, and this unfortunate Honey Bee stood no chance against such a formidable predator.  While Hanging Thieves and other Robber Flies are considered beneficial predators, they do not distinguish between eating beneficial pollinators and agricultural nuisance insects.  The mouth of the Hanging Thief is adapted to pierce and suck fluids from the body of the prey.  Hanging Thieves do not sting.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee / Wasp / Fly?
Location: Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
August 18, 2015 6:17 am
Hi – found this honeycomb with bee-like creatures on a plant in my garden, and previously I was swarmed near that plant and they felt like flies (no sting). Now on closer examination, they look like bees, but a very distinctive colour set? Are these bees? I haven’t seem similar on photos on google?
Signature: Desert Roamer

Honey Bee Hive

Honey Bee Hive

Dear Desert Roamer,
This is a wild Honey Bee hive as opposed to a domestic hive kept by a bee keeper.  Honey Bees are capable of stinging, but they are not aggressive.  Should you decide to eliminate them, you should find a local bee keeper who will remove the hive, preserving it in captivity to help pollinate orchards.

Thanks!
In that case I will leave them if they are not aggressive, as they seem quite happy at the plant there :)
Cheers

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Subject: Colorado bee eater
Location: Front range colorado
August 7, 2015 6:17 pm
Hi. We were loving this flowering bush and so were the honeybees. Unfortunately tonight we noticed lots of dead bees and lots of these insects- can’t find them online anywhere! They blend right in- look like dried up flowers.
Signature: Bonnie

Ambush Bug eats Honeybee

Ambush Bug eats Honeybee

Dear Bonnie,
When we first saw your subject line, we thought you were submitting images of one of the large, predatory Robber Flies in the genus
Mallophora, possibly the Belzebul Bee Eater.  Your Food Chain image is just as exciting.  This is an Ambush Bug in the genus Phymata, probably a Jagged Ambush Bug.

Thank you, Daniel.  Very cool!  Feel bad for the bees though 😉

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Subject: SO curious…

Location: Santa Cruz, Ca.
November 10, 2014 12:46 am
I found this insect drinking nectar with the honey bees in my garden. While my husband cannot see a difference between it and the bees, I see several differences. (If even sounds different when it flies.) It was spotted in Santa Cruz, California in early November. Please enlighten me!
Signature: Amber

Drone Fly (left) with Honey Bee

Drone Fly (left) with Honey Bee

Dear Amber,
You are quite observant.  We especially like your image of the Drone Fly,
Eristalis tenax, with the Honey Bee it mimics in the background.  Drone Flies are in the family Syrphidae and they do not bite nor sting.  See BugGuide for an excellent comparison image.

Drone Fly

Drone Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bees or Wasps?
Location: Miami, FL 33165
September 28, 2014 12:03 pm
09/28/2014
I live in Miami, FL 33165 and on 09/25/2014, a swarm of bees (or wasps) appeared in my backyard in the trunk of a dead hollow palm tree which has been used by birds for nesting (4 nesting holes). Our present temperature is high 80’s F during the day and mid-70’s F at night. This has been a very wet summer, including September.
Attached you will find copies of photos I have taken to determine what type of insect it is. If they are bees, how can I find beekeepers in this area that might be interested in picking them up.
Signature: Carmen L. León

Honey Bee Swarm

Honey Bee Swarm

Dear Carmen,
These are Honey Bees, and hollow trees are favored, natural sites for hives.  Periodically, an established hive will produce new queens that swarm with workers in an attempt to relocate and produce a new hive.  This can become a problem for homeowners if the new colony attempts to locate the hive in a chimney or attic of a home, but if this hive is high enough in the tree, we don’t imagine they will cause you any problems.  The Honey Bees will help to pollinate your fruit trees and flowers, and they will be a benefit to your garden.  If you decide that relocation is required, there are probably local beekeepers that will attempt to remove the hive.  Try the yellow pages.  It seems this particular colony is finding your hollow tree quite habitable, so removal of the hive may be difficult without cutting the tree.

Honey Bee Swarm

Honey Bee Swarm

Dear Daniel,
Thanks for your prompt reply.  I’m going to contact local beekeepers who might be interested in removing the hive.  The bees are about 8 feet up but next to the house and I’m afraid of possible stings to my dog, visiting children and myself.
Thank you for your help again,
Carmen

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Subject: Predatory bee killer!
Location: Tucson, AZ
August 20, 2014 5:39 pm
This enormous predator buzzed down to enjoy its dinner on an elk antler in my yard – what is it?
Signature: Alicia

Giant Robber Fly eats Bee

Giant Robber Fly eats Honey Bee

Dear Alicia,
This is one of the best feeding Robber Fly images we have received all summer.  This is a Giant Robber Fly in the genus
Promachus, a genus well populated in our archives this season due to all the images we have received of Red Footed Cannibalflies.  This is a different member of the genus, and we believe it is Promachus albifacies, a species with no unique common name.  You can compare your individual to this image on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination