Currently viewing the category: "Honey Bees"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Banded Garden Spider?
Location: Hialeah, Florida
September 8, 2016 7:43 am
I *think* this is a female Banded Garden Spider. I first saw it on August 14 and at first thought it was a tree snail due to the appearance of the back. The body was more than an inch long, and it stayed in its web in the same place for weeks, catching bees. I was rather hoping there would be a lot of baby spiders later, but a few weeks later there were 2 days of torrential rain during which time I didn’t look for her & when I did look, she was gone, leaving an intact web and no clue as to her disappearance. The third photo was one of a lucky series- I was taking a picture of her holding a webbed up bee when another bee landed in the web. She was on that second bee so fast I had to scramble to get pics! (I’ll send 3 more of the series in another query.)Spider webbing up caught bee. I chose these out of the series because one shows the bee clearly, and the other two do a fair job of showing the spinnerets in action.
Signature: Curious in Florida

Banded Garden Spider

Banded Garden Spider

Dear Curious in Florida,
Thanks for sending in your wonderful images of a Banded Garden Spider or Banded Orbweaver,
Argiope trifasciata.  They are an excellent addition to our archives.

Banded Garden Spider

Banded Garden Spider

Banded Garden Spider Snares Honey Bee

Banded Garden Spider Snares Honey Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this eating another bug?
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana, usa
August 5, 2016 5:44 pm
Looked like a fat bodie dragonfly but with spiky legs. About two inches long. Eating what looked like a bee. Little furry.
Signature: tittyj

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Honey Bee

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Honey Bee

Dear tittyj,
We are pretty certain your predator is a Robber Fly known as a Red Footed Cannibalfly, and the prey appears to be a Honey Bee.  The tip of the abdomen indicates this individual is a male.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Assassin bug?
Location: Beavercreek, OH
August 24, 2015 3:18 am
This bug landed at our table at our local pool. It was carrying a bee & sat there for a few minutes with it’s stinger in the bees head feeding on it.
Signature: Kerry

Hanging Thief eats Robber Fly

Hanging Thief eats Robber Fly

Dear Kerry,
This is not an Assassin Bug.  It is a Robber Fly in the genus
Diogmites, a group known as the Hanging Thieves because they often hang from one leg while feeding.  They take prey on the wing, and this unfortunate Honey Bee stood no chance against such a formidable predator.  While Hanging Thieves and other Robber Flies are considered beneficial predators, they do not distinguish between eating beneficial pollinators and agricultural nuisance insects.  The mouth of the Hanging Thief is adapted to pierce and suck fluids from the body of the prey.  Hanging Thieves do not sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee / Wasp / Fly?
Location: Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
August 18, 2015 6:17 am
Hi – found this honeycomb with bee-like creatures on a plant in my garden, and previously I was swarmed near that plant and they felt like flies (no sting). Now on closer examination, they look like bees, but a very distinctive colour set? Are these bees? I haven’t seem similar on photos on google?
Signature: Desert Roamer

Honey Bee Hive

Honey Bee Hive

Dear Desert Roamer,
This is a wild Honey Bee hive as opposed to a domestic hive kept by a bee keeper.  Honey Bees are capable of stinging, but they are not aggressive.  Should you decide to eliminate them, you should find a local bee keeper who will remove the hive, preserving it in captivity to help pollinate orchards.

Thanks!
In that case I will leave them if they are not aggressive, as they seem quite happy at the plant there :)
Cheers

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Colorado bee eater
Location: Front range colorado
August 7, 2015 6:17 pm
Hi. We were loving this flowering bush and so were the honeybees. Unfortunately tonight we noticed lots of dead bees and lots of these insects- can’t find them online anywhere! They blend right in- look like dried up flowers.
Signature: Bonnie

Ambush Bug eats Honeybee

Ambush Bug eats Honeybee

Dear Bonnie,
When we first saw your subject line, we thought you were submitting images of one of the large, predatory Robber Flies in the genus
Mallophora, possibly the Belzebul Bee Eater.  Your Food Chain image is just as exciting.  This is an Ambush Bug in the genus Phymata, probably a Jagged Ambush Bug.

Thank you, Daniel.  Very cool!  Feel bad for the bees though 😉

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: SO curious…

Location: Santa Cruz, Ca.
November 10, 2014 12:46 am
I found this insect drinking nectar with the honey bees in my garden. While my husband cannot see a difference between it and the bees, I see several differences. (If even sounds different when it flies.) It was spotted in Santa Cruz, California in early November. Please enlighten me!
Signature: Amber

Drone Fly (left) with Honey Bee

Drone Fly (left) with Honey Bee

Dear Amber,
You are quite observant.  We especially like your image of the Drone Fly,
Eristalis tenax, with the Honey Bee it mimics in the background.  Drone Flies are in the family Syrphidae and they do not bite nor sting.  See BugGuide for an excellent comparison image.

Drone Fly

Drone Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination