Currently viewing the category: "Bumble Bees"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bumble Bee Assult
Location: Central Michigan
November 27, 2013 6:51 pm
Greetings, I took this picture back in 2005 when out of a mid morning walk through a semi wooded in Michigan. Eastern side of the northern L.P. (Yale if ya can find it on a map). I recently came across the image again and I’m baffled by what is attacking(?) that poor bee. Doesn’t look like a mosquito, but does appear to attacking like one. Wish a had a shot from the other side, but they both took off when I tried moving around them. Wondering if you can help identify the attacker, and clarify if this is an aggressive attack leading to the bees death or just a blood meal feeding like mosquitos do? Thanks
Signature: Glenn

Golden Northern Bumble Bee attacked by possibly Tachinid Fly

Golden Northern Bumble Bee and Syrphid FLy

Hi Glenn,
We believe, but we are not certain, that your bee is a Golden Northern Bumble Bee,
Bombus fervidus, and you can compare your image to photos posted to BugGuide.  We are guessing the fly is a Tachinid Fly, and according to BugGuide:  “Larval stages are parasitoids of other arthropods; hosts include members of 11 insect orders, centipedes, spiders, and scorpions. Some tachinids are very host-specific, others parasitize a wide variety of hosts. The most common hosts are caterpillars. Most tachinids deposit their eggs directly on the body of their host, and it is not uncommon to see caterpillars with several tachinid eggs on them. Upon hatching the larva usually burrows into its host and feeds internally. Full-grown larva leaves the host and pupates nearby. Some tachinids lay their eggs on foliage; the larvae are flattened and are called planidia; they remain on the foliage until they find a suitable host.“  We will check with Eric Eaton to get his opinion on this photo.

Eric Eaton provides some input
Looks like a male bumble bee of some kind, with a syrphid riding on it (Allograpta, Toxomerus, or something else, awkward angle at which to make an identification of either insect).
Eric

Hi,
Thanks for the quick reply, and information. Has a tough shot, had the camera about a foot over my head trying to see the screen at a pretty shallow angle. But it’s had me wondering back then and now. I presume it leads to the death of the bumble bee over time. Seems internal feeding wouldn’t bode well for the host =(
Hope ya had a good Thanksgiving
Glenn

Hi again Glenn,
Eric Eaton believes the fly to be a Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae.  If that is the case, it most likely just alighted on the Bumble Bee and there was no predation involved.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bumble bee
Location: NYS, Orange County
July 5, 2013 11:54 am
Dear Bugman,
I tried to ID this bumble bee but am not sure. It was the only bright yellow bee among the others on my lavender..so I took this pic but it was hard to get a clear one. Do you have any idea which it is?
Signature: klavierabend

Yellow Fronted Bumble Bee

Yellow Fronted Bumble Bee

Dear klavierabend,
Based on the coloration and pattern on your bee, we believe this is a Yellow Fronted Bumble Bee,
Bombus flavifrons, a species we posted exactly a month ago.  According to BugGuide, it is:  “Widely distributed in US and Canada.” 

Many thanks for your work!!!
K

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: a type of bumble, or something else?
Location: West Seattle
May 31, 2013 5:22 pm
I have bees browsing a swath of pink geraniums in West Seattle.
Can you tell me what kind they are, or if they are juveniles of a common bee?
Signature: Terre Shattuck

Yellow Fronted Bumble Bees

Yellow Fronted Bumble Bees

Hi Terre,
Thanks to BugGuide, we were able to identify your Yellow Fronted Bumble Bees, Bombus flavifrons.  According to BugGuide:  “Widely distributed in US and Canada.”   These really are beautiful Bumble Bees.  We are postdating your submission to go live in early June while we are away from the office.

Yellow Fronted Bumble Bee

Yellow Fronted Bumble Bee

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Location: Andover, NJ, backyard
May 26, 2013 11:04 am
Hi BugGuy,
Hoping you can help me out with this bee. I live in northern NJ and saw this small bee today on my chive blossoms. There was also a carpenter bee on the blossoms, and this bee was roughly 1/2 the size of the carpenter, or about 1/2 inch (est). I’ve tried to find an ID for it and the closest I can come is that it may be some sort of digger bee?
Any help would be gratefully appreciated!
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Bumble Bee

Bumble Bee

Dear Deborah,
In our opinion, this looks like a Bumble Bee in the genus
Bombus.  We often find identifying Bumble Bees to the species level to be a challenge, but you can try browsing the images on BugGuide for possibilities.

Bumble Bee

Bumble Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant Bee!
Location: Toronto, ON, Canada
May 3, 2013 1:49 pm
This giant bee flew into my office not once, but twice! Early May, Toronto, ON Canada.
Very aggressive, about 2” long, maybe 0.5” thick. Was trying to sting the windowsill, left venom where it had stung the metal windowsill. Once caught in a cardboard box it could be heard and felt stinging the box…!
Signature: Best, Claire

Queen Bumblebee

Queen Bumblebee

Dear Claire,
Based on the behavior and size you described of the insect in this instagram image (not ideal for species identifications), we deduce this is a female Bumblebee recently emerged from Hibernation.  She is a aggressive because she wants to build her hive in some abandoned underground mouse burrow or bird house.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mating bees
Location: mason City, Ia
August 14, 2012 8:49 pm
Had to share a couple pictures of these bees that I almost stepped on in my backyard. Since they were not moving I went in to get my camera and captured the following pictures. Picture 1 is of the 2 bees in the grass(please note that we are going through a drought right now)picture 2 was taken after the 2 flew around the yard and landed on a bush. This is something I had never seen before and was glad to capture it.
Signature: Amber Olsen

Mating Bumble Bees

Hi Amber,
Thanks for sending your wonderful photos of mating Bumble Bees.  We wish we could determine the species.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide that information.

Mating Bumble Bees

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination