Currently viewing the category: "Bees"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Busy milkweeds
Location: Columbus, Ohio
July 12, 2016 1:04 pm
So the milkweeds seem to be the water cooler of the insect world. We have monarchs, Japanese beetles, tons of bees (honey and bumbles), and these red mating things! Their flowers are a pretty color and they really have a pleasant and strong scent. I’m rather surprised that these weren’t grown on purpose before the whole monarch decline. Any way, were enjoying the show and hope to get a caterpillar or two.
Signature: Amber

Mating Large Milkweed Bugs

Mating Large Milkweed Bugs

Dear Amber,
There is indeed quite a robust ecosystem surrounding milkweed, which is one of the reasons we created a Milkweed Meadow tag on our site recently.  Monarch Butterflies need milkweed as it is the only food consumed by the Monarch Caterpillars.  Milkweed Borers and Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillars are other visitors you might expect in the future.  Your mating Large Milkweed Bugs are another species that depends upon milkweed.  Many pollinators like your Bumble Bees, numerous species of butterflies and many wasps including Tarantula Hawks (mostly in western states), while not dependent upon milkweed as a sole food, are attracted to the fragrant blooms that are laden with nectar.  We will attempt to identify your Bumble Bee species.  

Bumble Bees

Bumble Bees

Bumble Bee

Bumble Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bee looking bug?
Location: New York, 10960
July 8, 2016 10:07 am
I know there are carpenter bees eating away at my deck. But the other day I saw this guy just lurking around. It doesn’t look like the others. The thorax is much longer than the C-bees. And the black circle, by where the wings attach to the body, surrounded by the gold fuzz is much much larger.
Image 1 is the bug in question
Image 2 is the carpenter bee
Thank you!
Signature: Deena

Sculptured Resin Bee

Sculptured Resin Bee

Dear Deena,
The Bee in question is an introduced Sculptured Resin Bee,
Megachile sculpturalis, and according to BugGuide:  “They are opportunistic and nest in existing wooden cavities, rather than excavating their own. Effectively pollinate kudzu, another invasive species.”  Thanks for including the image of the Eastern Carpenter Bee for comparison.

Eastern Carpenter Bee

Eastern Carpenter Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mettalic Green Bee, Nest and Guard
Location: Toronto Canada
June 29, 2016 6:35 pm
Could not resist sending you one more photo of my bees. hope you do not mind.
Signature: Scott Morrow

Metallic Green Sweat Bees and Nest

Metallic Green Sweat Bees and Nest

Hi again Scott,
This new image of Metallic Green Sweat Bees,
Agapostemon virescens, is a marvelous addition to the previously sent images, and it is greatly welcomed on our site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Washington State Solitary Bee
Location: Washington, USA
June 23, 2016 11:40 pm
I found this odd unfurred black bee roaming around while we were planting flowers, and we figured it must be some sort of solitary bee, as there was only one at the time.
Signature: Wesley Grubbs

Leaf Cutter Bee

Leaf-Cutter Bee

Dear Wesley,
We believe this is a Leaf-Cutter Bee in the genus Megachile, a large and diverse genus.  It resembles the image of
Megachile relativa which is pictured on BugGuide, and the species has been reported from nearby British Columbia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unusual bees in Southern California
Location: 90066
June 22, 2016 5:48 pm
I’ve been seeing these bees in my garden occasionally, and I haven’t been able to identify them. It’s about the size of a honey bee, but fuzzier and grayer. They seem to like yellow flowers best, especially cosmos. Do you know what they are? Where can I find more information about them?
PS: Great web site. This is an incredibly helpful resource.
Signature: Sunny in Mar Vista

Solitary Bee

Possibly Furry Leafcutter Bee

Dear Sunny,
According to BugGuide, there are 3500 species of Bees in North America.  We are guessing your white bee might be a Furry Leafcutter Bee,
Megachile perihirta, based on this BugGuide image, and according to BugGuide‘s data, there have been California sightings from May through October.  We will attempt to identify your second Solitary Bee, though we may just contact Eric Eaton to get his input as we anticipate difficulty securing an accurate identification if left to our own devices.

Solitary Bee

Solitary Bee

Thanks for the information. I didn’t realize these were 2 different species.

Solitary Bee

Solitary Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Baby it’s hot out here!
Location: Mesa , Arizona
June 20, 2016 4:10 pm
Hi
I thought you might get a kick out of this photo of what I believe is a drone carpenter bee. It climbed up on my finger while I was out on my patio today. I think it found the surface of my skin much cooler than the 116 degree surface of my table. That is in the shade by the way. I finally persuaded it to leave my finger and perch on the side of a plant pot. I felt guilty for leaving it out there while I returned inside my house, but since it is native I’m sure it it’s taking the heat better than us mammals. Stay cool everyone!
Signature: Toasty Arizona nature lover

Male Valley Carpenter Bee

Male Valley Carpenter Bee

Dear Toasty Arizona nature lover,
This is indeed a male Valley Carpenter Bee.  Males are shorter lived than females who need to construct and provision a nest after mating.  In Los Angeles, male Valley Carpenter Bees are generally flying in the spring and long gone by the time summer arrives, so they don’t compete with females for food.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination