Currently viewing the category: "Bees"
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Subject: bug identification
Location: Howrah, West Bengal, India
July 25, 2015 12:10 am
Sir,
these photographs are of a type of bee I guess. They were sucking honey from sacred basil flowers. I shall be grateful if you can provide me with further details.
Regards
Signature: Sreeradha Seth

Metallic Sweat Bee

Metallic Sweat Bee

Dear Sreeradha,
Based on its similarity to North American species including this image on BugGuide, we believe this is a Metallic Sweat Bee in the family Halictidae, but alas, we were not able to find any similar images from India on the internet.  We did uncover this technical article including species from the family found in India, but it has no illustrations.  Metallic Sweat Bees are solitary bees with each female producing her own underground nest.  Your images are beautiful.

Metallic Sweat Bee

Metallic Sweat Bee

Metallic Sweat Bee

Metallic Sweat Bee

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Subject: What kind of bees are these???
Location: Springfield Pa
July 5, 2015 10:34 am
Can someone please tell me what kind of bees these are? We noticed them last week and sprayed where they seem to be making a nest in the arm of our awning? We thought we got rid of them and now they are back.
When my 4 year old sees them she wont go outside:(
Thanks in advance for your help!!
Signature: Dina

Giant Resin Bee

Giant Resin Bee

Dear Dina,
This sure looks to us like an invasive, exotic Giant Resin Bee,
Megachile sculpturalis, and you can verify our identification by comparing your image to those on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “They are opportunistic and nest in existing wooden cavities, rather than excavating their own. Effectively pollinate kudzu, another invasive species.”

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Subject: bees
Location: Saudi Arabia- Madinah
April 21, 2015 8:27 am
Hi!
I’ve found a strange bee, it’s smaller than Common bees.
Signature: M.A

Solitary Bee

Solitary Bee

Dear M.A,
This is some species of Solitary Bee, and we will continue to search in the hope of providing something more specific.  We didn’t see anything that looked like a good match for the distinctive abdominal markings on your individual when we searched Gordon’s Solitary Bee Page.

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Subject: Mystery bug hiding on lupine
Location: Sunol-Ohlone Wilderness, CA
April 15, 2015 7:31 pm
I was taking a photo of the bee on the lupine, and only noticed later the insect that was upside down on the stalk. I have no idea what it is, can you please help me identify it?
Signature: R. Battaglia

Solitary Bee shares Lupine with Snakefly

Solitary Bee shares Lupine with Snakefly

Dear R. Battaglia,
The insect hiding along the stalk of the lupine is a Snakefly, in the order Raphidioptera, and according to BugGuide:  “Both larvae and adults are predatory, though they are capable of catching and killing only small and weak prey. Snakefly larvae feed on eggs and larvae of various insects, as well as adults of minute arthropods (e.g. mites, springtails, barklice, and homopterans). Adults typically prefer aphids but may eat a wide variety of arthropods.”
  Though females possess an ovipositor that resembles a stinger, Snakeflies are harmless to humans.  We are very curious about your Solitary Bee because of our interest our own in native pollinators and their relationship to native plants.  This may be a Leafcutter Bee in the genus Megachile, and BugGuide has many subgenera represented, but alas, we would need input from someone with more experience to provide a definitive identification.

Dear Mr. Marlos,
Thank you for the Snakefly ID.  Regarding the bee, although that particular picture was taken in Sunol, I do have a healthy population of leafcutters in my yard in Pleasanton, as evidenced by the many notched leaves of my Redbud.  I’ve had a fabulous collection of native pollinators in my yard this year!
Thanks again,
Robyn

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Subject: is it a bee?
Location: Oahu (Hawaii)
April 14, 2015 11:58 am
I live in Hawaii. I often see black carpenter bees around my lavender plants. Lately, I’ve seen a bright honey colored bee? that is on flowers on the fence. It is huge, and very aggressive. It flys very fast. Is he dangerous?
Signature: jean

Male Carpenter Bee

Male Carpenter Bee

Dear Jean,
Often female Carpenter Bees like you describe are very long lived, as they have to excavate tunnels in wood to serve as a nest for the young, and the nests need to be provisioned with pollen.  Many Carpenter Bees exhibit extreme sexual dimorphism, with males looking like entirely different species, as is the case with the Valley Carpenter Bee.  Male Valley Carpenter Bees are bright golden yellow, and they are very territorial, hence the aggressive behavior you observed, but since they lack stingers, they are perfectly harmless.  The much less aggressive females are capable of stinging, but we have never heard of a person being stung by a Carpenter Bee.  Male Carpenter Bees do not live as long as females, so you have probably never noticed them before.  The Sonoran Carpenter Bee,
Xylocopa sonorina, has been introduced to Hawaii, and males are golden in color

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Subject: Black ?wasp ?beetle ?bee
Location: Merida, Yucatan, Mexico
April 7, 2015 7:47 am
I found this bug in my pool. It is about 35mm long and entirely black. the abdomen is hard shinny black. I can not find an image at the many bug related ID sites and was hoping you could help!
Signature: Jeffrey Scherer

Female Carpenter Bee

Female Carpenter Bee

Dear Jeffrey,
This is a female Carpenter Bee, probably a Valley Carpenter Bee,
Xylocopa varipuncta.  Females are capable of stinging, but they are not aggressive bees.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination