Currently viewing the category: "Bees"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: weird bug mating with bee
Location: high point, north carolina
August 15, 2016 5:26 pm
so i was sitting in my room and i looked on the screen of my window and saw a large-ish bug mating with a bee (bumble bee i think). the bee was “on bottom” and the larger bug was on top. the large bug had wings and large bulge-y black eyes. it seemed as if the wings went into a point at the bottom so it appeared somewhat in a triangle shape. i don’t know if that type of bug and bees mate often but the mating thing might help.
Signature: -brit

Robber Fly Eats Bee

Robber Fly Eats Bee

Dear -brit,
Bees and other insects do not engage in interspecies mating.  Your image is not ideal for identification purposes, but we believe you have observed a Robber Fly eating a Bee.  Large Robber Flies often prey upon wasps and bees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black Bee
Location: Faribault County, Minnesota
August 9, 2016 12:12 pm
Greetings, What’s that Bug Volunteers!
I am happy to say the bug activity in my Rain Garden is finally picking up. I was wondering how long that would take, so I am now relieved. I watched a Leaf Cutter Bee cut a leaf and fly off with her prize for her nest. I witnessed a Monarch Butterfly lay an egg on a Milkweed stem. I’ve seen TWO Great Black Wasps on the Milkweed. The Soldier Beetles are back in abundance, as are the Cicada Killer Wasps. The Northern Paper Wasps like getting drinks at the birdbath. And the aphids are emerging on the Milkweed so I expect the lacewings and lady beetles will soon arrive, along with those tiny parasitic wasps.
The photos I’ve attached are of a black bee which has proven quite challenging to photograph. I finally caught it on a late Miniature Hollyhock blossom over this past weekend. I like the pollen sacs on the legs. I have Bumble Bees of various sizes in my garden; this though does not appear to be a Bumble Bee.
Can you help me out?
Blessings to one and all,
Wanda J. Kothlow
Signature: Wanda J. Kothlow

Black Bee

Female Two-Spotted Longhorned Bee

Hi again Wanda,
How nice to hear your rain garden is thriving.  We just hear yesterday that Southern California may be expecting a dry “La Niña” winter next winter, though since our predicted wet “El Niño” winter last year was a bust, all bets are off on what will really happen.  In our memory, miniature hollyhocks are about an inch across, which would make this black Bee about half that.  Are we correct?  We suspect this might be a Carpenter Bee, and we are requesting assistance from Eric Eaton as we cannot provide you with anything specific at this time.

Black Bee

Two-Spotted Longhorned Bee

Eric Eaton Responds
Daniel:
Female of the Two-spotted Longhorned Bee, Melissodes bimaculatus.  Males have antennae about twice as long as the females.
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America

Ed. Note:  Here is a link to BugGuide.  There is also some great information on Discover Life.

Two-Spotted Longhorned Bee

Two-Spotted Longhorned Bee

Greetings, Daniel et al!
Yes, your memory is correct. Miniature Hollyhocks (Sidalcea sp) blossoms are an inch or just a tad larger. Quite prolific here and terrific pollinator draws; not as magnetic as Milkweed, Liatris or Monarda, but still good draws.
Speaking of milkweed, I noticed an overabundance of Large Milkweed Bug nymphs last week. And I do mean overabundance. The aphids don’t annoy me since I know my integrated past management system will address that issue. The large Milkweed Bugs though, well I guess I live with them or remove a colony here and there with snippers and a plastic bag …
Exciting to hear I can add a new insect to my list of photos! A female Two-spotted Longhorned Bee! WooHoo! She’s quite a “tease” in that she never landed long enough for me to focus and photograph until recently. Glad she was hungry long enough for me to take her picture!
Hope you are safe where you are in CA; I keep praying for rain where it is needed and dry where it is too wet.
Thank you yet again for your assistance in helping my insect list grow!
Blessings,
Wanda J. Kothlow

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this eating another bug?
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana, usa
August 5, 2016 5:44 pm
Looked like a fat bodie dragonfly but with spiky legs. About two inches long. Eating what looked like a bee. Little furry.
Signature: tittyj

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Honey Bee

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Honey Bee

Dear tittyj,
We are pretty certain your predator is a Robber Fly known as a Red Footed Cannibalfly, and the prey appears to be a Honey Bee.  The tip of the abdomen indicates this individual is a male.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Small yellow and black bees in my bathroom
Location: Northeast Ohio
August 5, 2016 11:01 am
Hi bugman,
We are in the suburbs of Akron, Ohio, near Cuyahoga Valley National Park. We’ve had several very small bees come in through our bathroom exhaust fan. They are 1 cm long and have broken yellow stripes across their back. Most of them are dead by the time we Find them on the bathroom floor, but we have relocated 2 living bees back to the great outdoors. Those 2 seemed very docile. I’m an environmental educator but I can’t find this little bee in my guides or in my memory banks. Can you help me identify them please?
Signature: Cuyahoga Claudia

European Wool Carder Bee

European Wool Carder Bee

Dear Cuyahoga Claudia,
This is an introduced European Wool Carder Bee,
Anthidium manicatum, which you can verify by comparing your images to images of living individuals on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Females collect “wool” from downy plants such as Lamb’s Ears to line their nest cavities” and “Introduced from Europe before 1963; spreading throughout NE. & W. NA”.  The fact that it is an imported species may account for its lack of inclusion in guide books.

European Wool Carder Bee

European Wool Carder Bee

Thank you so much! I came across a picture of a wool carder bee shortly after I sent in my message and thought it was the closest I had seen, but I still wasn’t sure. I hope they stop flinging themselves to their death through my exhaust fan- they’re beautiful little bees!
Thanks again,
Claudia

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Busy milkweeds
Location: Columbus, Ohio
July 12, 2016 1:04 pm
So the milkweeds seem to be the water cooler of the insect world. We have monarchs, Japanese beetles, tons of bees (honey and bumbles), and these red mating things! Their flowers are a pretty color and they really have a pleasant and strong scent. I’m rather surprised that these weren’t grown on purpose before the whole monarch decline. Any way, were enjoying the show and hope to get a caterpillar or two.
Signature: Amber

Mating Large Milkweed Bugs

Mating Large Milkweed Bugs

Dear Amber,
There is indeed quite a robust ecosystem surrounding milkweed, which is one of the reasons we created a Milkweed Meadow tag on our site recently.  Monarch Butterflies need milkweed as it is the only food consumed by the Monarch Caterpillars.  Milkweed Borers and Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillars are other visitors you might expect in the future.  Your mating Large Milkweed Bugs are another species that depends upon milkweed.  Many pollinators like your Bumble Bees, numerous species of butterflies and many wasps including Tarantula Hawks (mostly in western states), while not dependent upon milkweed as a sole food, are attracted to the fragrant blooms that are laden with nectar.  We will attempt to identify your Bumble Bee species.  

Bumble Bees

Bumble Bees

Bumble Bee

Bumble Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bee looking bug?
Location: New York, 10960
July 8, 2016 10:07 am
I know there are carpenter bees eating away at my deck. But the other day I saw this guy just lurking around. It doesn’t look like the others. The thorax is much longer than the C-bees. And the black circle, by where the wings attach to the body, surrounded by the gold fuzz is much much larger.
Image 1 is the bug in question
Image 2 is the carpenter bee
Thank you!
Signature: Deena

Sculptured Resin Bee

Sculptured Resin Bee

Dear Deena,
The Bee in question is an introduced Sculptured Resin Bee,
Megachile sculpturalis, and according to BugGuide:  “They are opportunistic and nest in existing wooden cavities, rather than excavating their own. Effectively pollinate kudzu, another invasive species.”  Thanks for including the image of the Eastern Carpenter Bee for comparison.

Eastern Carpenter Bee

Eastern Carpenter Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination