Currently viewing the category: "Bees"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cave bee?
Location: Chinhoyi caves 17°21′0″S 30°07′30″E
February 10, 2016 11:03 am
This pretty blue bee? was in the Chinhoyi caves near Chinhoyi in Zimbabwe. It was in the large open access tunnel between the entrance and The Sleeping Pool so it might just have wandered in from the pool.
It was about 2 cm long and made a continuous buzzing sound like a bee. There was only the one bee and it was flying around as if it was exploring the walls. It didn’t seem to want to leave the cave but was just exploring the walls.
My nephew took the photos but he is happy for me to send them to you as he also wants to know.
The first photo is just the bee. The second includes a dead spider which might help for scale and also shows the side view although it is a little blurred. The third photo is just to show the tunnel where we saw it.
Signature: Upapa Epops

Solitary Bee

Solitary Bee

Dear Upapa,
Though we cannot identify your solitary blue Bee at this time, we are posting your lovely images and we hope to get some input from our readership.

Solitary Bee

Solitary Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bumble Bee?
Location: Manchester, CT.
January 27, 2016 6:45 pm
Dear Bugman,
I took this shot in 2007 in Manchester, CT., First question is, is this a Bumble Bee? and what is the yellow on it’s back leg? Is this a part of the bee? or maybe pollen it’s collecting? I’ve seen many similar bees, but not the yellow ? on the leg. Is it common?
Signature: buzz

Bumble Bee

Bumble Bee

Dear buzz,
This is a Bumble Bee, and that is a full pollen basket on the hind leg.  Female Bumble Bees gather pollen when they are nesting to provide food for her developing brood.  It is likely that Bumble Bees are not as common as they once were in parts of their range.  BugGuide has the following information on when to sight Bumble Bees:  “Mated, overwintered Queens emerge from their hibernacula in very early-late spring, depending on the species. Workers emerge in late spring-early summer after which they build in numbers, and persist until late summer-late fall depending on the species. Virgin queens and males appear in summer-fall, depending on the species, and visit flowers at that time along with foraging workers. At the end of the season workers and males die and mated queens enter their hibernacula where they remain dormant until spring. In warm areas such as southern California and south Florida bumble bees can be found flying even in mid-winter.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Pacific Palisades CA 90272
November 23, 2015 3:36 pm
Not sure if it is a drone bee or not. Found it in our yard
Pacific Palisades CA
Thanks
Nancy
Ps. Doing this on my phone. Hope the first picture is of it next to the ruler. Can’t see the image it’s so small
Signature: Nancy

Male Valley Carpenter Bee

Male Valley Carpenter Bee

Dear Nancy,
Thanks for sending three images.  That gives us a choice of what to post.  We are posting the close-up of this male Valley Carpenter Bee.  The species has pronounced sexual dimorphism, and the golden males look like an entirely different species than the black female Valley Carpenter Bee.  The differences are most stunning when the sexes are viewed together, and if there is still any doubt that they are the same species, here is a mating pair of Valley Carpenter Bees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird Bee
Location: LaSalle, Ontario Canada
November 19, 2015 4:38 pm
Hello, I am contacting you because in August I got a photo of this white bee with green eyes. I live in extreme south Ontario in Essex county if you want to know where I saw it. This bee was the size of a Honeybee and was calm. I could get close to it too.
Signature: ?

Longhorned Bee

Longhorned Bee

This is a Longhorned Bee in the tribe Eucerini, and the diversity in the tribe is well documented on BugGuide.

Longhorned Bee

Longhorned Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect Borneo
Location: borneo
November 13, 2015 1:04 am
In Danum, Sabah, Borneo, we saw this insect flying and resting.
Can you help us to put a name on it?
thank you
Signature: fred from belgium

Carpenter Bee

Carpenter Bee

Dear Fred,
We have a few images in our archive of this Carpenter Bee from Borneo.

Great! thanks a lot!
Beautyfull information!
fred

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: small insect on marjoram
Location: Cardiff, Wales, UK
September 21, 2015 2:12 am
Hi, I photographed this insect on a marjoram plant in the wales, UK, and can’t find anything that looks like it in my Collins guide. It seems to have short stubby wings and a long body This photo was taken using a 1:1 macro lens to give you an idea of scale, and the marjoram flowers are probably 2-5mm across. Any idea as to what it is would be gratefully received!
many thanks
Signature: chris stock

Possibly Cuckoo Bee

Possibly Cuckoo Bee

Dear Chris,
Our best guess at this time is that this might be a Cuckoo Bee in the genus
Nomada, and of Nomada ferruginata, Nature Spot states: “This Nomada bee has a red abdomen with yellow flashes at the sides. It has dull yellow legs with dark femora. It lacks stripes on the thorax and has a pair of bright yellow tubercles on the pronotum near to the wing bases.”

Many thanks for your help, what a fantastic website/resource!
all the best
chris

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination