Currently viewing the category: "Bees"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee
Location: Long Beach, CA
July 14, 2014 10:47 pm
Ok, so this is a bee (in Long Beach, CA). But what’s that orangey thing on the back of the bee that looks kind of like roe (if this were a fish rather than a worker bee)?
Thanks!
Signature: InfiniteMonkey

Honey Bee with Pollen Sac

Honey Bee with Pollen Sac

Dear InfiniteMonkey,
It appears you already know the answer since your digital file is named “beepollen”
and the location is typical of the pollen sac of a Honey Bee.  Though the pollen collected by your individual Honey Bee appears different, it is not to dissimilar than this image of a Honey Bee from Forestry Images.

Thanks! I was guessing that’s what it was, but I couldn’t find a similar image. (And actually I was thinking more of the pollen collecting when I named the image).
Love your site!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bee
Location: Colorado front range
July 12, 2014 3:22 pm
I have seen the attached orange body bee twice now at elevations above 9000 feet in Colorado. Can you identify it for me?
Thanks/Fred
Signature: Fred Foto

Hunt's Bumble Bee, we believe

Hunt’s Bumble Bee, we believe

Dear Fred,
There are several species of Bumble Bees with red stripes on the abdomen, and we believe your individual is a Hunt’s Bumble Bee,
Bombus huntii, a species that BugGuide reports at high elevations.  The Yellow Fronted Bumble Bee, Bombus flavifrons, which is pictured on BugGuide, is also a high elevation species and like your individual, it appears considerably furrier than the Hunt’s Bumble Bee.  Our money is on Hunt’s Bumble Bee.

Hunt's Bumble Bee, we believe

Hunt’s Bumble Bee, we believe

Thanks very much.  I take a lot of flower pictures, and often see a pollinators on flowers.
Let me know if I can help support your site.
Fred Fisher

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bees in Compost!!
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
July 9, 2014 8:28 pm
Hello!!! I’m in Calgary, AB, Canada and have had some bees move into the compost in my backyard. It’s now mid July and I noticed them about a week ago, but I have no idea how long they have been there. I’m honestly curious to learn as much about them as I can. They don’t appear aggressive, and I know bees are on the decline. The compost is a large plastic bin which at this time only has grass clippings in it. They are all old, dead grass clippings from last year so are more straw-like in consistency. It has a lid and is closed and dark.
I apologize that the pic is a bit blurry, please let me know if you need a clearer one (That was terrifying, I stayed pretty far away and used a great deal of zoom lol)
Signature: Thank You So Much! Elena

Bumble Bee

Bumble Bee

Hi Elena,
This is a native Bumble Bee and we have gotten other reports of Bumble Bees nesting in compost piles, birdhouses and other man-made refuges.  Bumble Bees are not aggressive, but they are capable of stinging.  The bees getting all the publicity lately because of Colony Collapse Disorder are domestic Honey Bees.  Honey Bees are domesticated and not native, however, there are wild hives that are formed when new queens create new colonies in chimneys, hollow trees and other protected locations.

Thank you so much for your prompt reply! Let the research commense!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bumble on a Prickly Pear Cactus Flower (Little Saint Simons Island, GA)
Location: Little Saint Simons Island, Georgia
June 25, 2014 6:12 pm
Hello Bugman,
I was on my honeymoon at the end of May on Little Saint Simons Island, Georgia. What an amazing place! While bicycling to the beach, I noticed this bumble noshing on the prickly pear cactus flowers. I am thinking that it is a queen bumblebee because of its size? Given the diversity of bee species in the US, I have no idea the exact species of this critter but am hoping that you do! By the way, on our way from Long Island New York (where I live) to Little Saint Simons, we stopped at Chincoteague Island, Virginia. I bought your new book at the National Wildlife Refuge Visitors Center. A great read!
Thanks,
Laura
Signature: Laura klahre

Bumble Bee

Bumble Bee

Dear Laura,
According to BugGuide, there are 46 species of Bumble Bees north of Mexico, and we are not certain of the exact identity of your Bumble Bee.  Thanks for letting us know about finding The Curious World of Bugs at the National Wildlife Refuge Visitors Center in Virginia.  We are happy you enjoyed it.

Bumble Bee

Bumble Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: green bee
Location: Denver CO
June 8, 2014 12:17 pm
There has appeared in my buffalo grass lawn several dirt mounds that at first seem to be larger steep ant hills, but today I saw these colorful bees going in and out. Are they natives?
Signature: Jeanette

Metallic Sweat Bee

Metallic Sweat Bees

Hi Jeanette,
These beautiful, little, native bees are known as Metallic Sweat Bees, most likely in the genus
Agapostemon, based on images posted to BugGuide.  Of the subfamily Halictinae, BugGuide notes:  “Most species nest in burrows in banks or in the ground (Augochlora uses partially rotten logs). Some are primitively eusocial; in such cases usually a female guards the entrance to the burrow by plugging it with her head. Generally the main burrow is vertical; it sends horizontal branches, each branch ending in a solitary cell.”  One of your images illustrates a Metallic Sweat Bee flying toward a hole that has its opening plugged by the head of another bee.

OK, I guess I have seen both small and larger sweat bees in the yard.  I’ll try to get some better photos.  I’m seeing several different kinds of bumblebees also.
Thank you Daniel,
Jeanette

Metallic Sweat Bee

Metallic Sweat Bee

Wonderful Daniel!  I noticed that each opening of the three or four there would often have a bee in it, I kept waiting to try to get a good picture, but they would duck back down.  I have lots of mostly native flowers blooming in my yard right now, it is delightful to get native insects too.
I always thought sweat bees, or what we called sweat bees, were not as large as these.  These are closer to the size of honey bees ( though these in the picture are smaller than honey bees) .  Sorry I didn’t have anything to compare it to in the picture.
Thank you for your good work,
Jeanette

Hi Jeanette,
Some species of Sweat Bees are quite small.  Bee Informed lists their size range as between 1/4 and 3/4 inch.

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Perhaps a Leaf Cutter Bee?
Location: Coryell County, Texas
June 5, 2014 12:41 pm
Hello, I was photographing flowers in the yard when I noticed this bee. It has bright yellow under its abdomen. I wondered if it is pollen? I saw the beautiful leaf cutter bee posted last week and wondered if this one is similar.
Thanks!
Signature: Ellen

Leaf Cutter Bee

Leaf Cutter Bee

Hi Ellen,
We are jealous that you are getting to spend so much time in the garden.  We are still dealing with final examinations and presentations from our students.  You are correct.  This is a Leaf Cutter Bee in the genus
Megachile, and they do collect pollen on the underside of the abdomen.

Leaf Cutter Bee

Leaf Cutter Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination