Currently viewing the category: "Bees"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bumblebees (for adult viewing)
Location: Oceanside, NY
September 10, 2014 2:51 pm
It’s THAT time of year!
I thought you might like to add this to your collection.
Any idea which bumblebees these two are?
Signature: CarlF

Mating Bumble Bees

Mating Bumble Bees

Dear CarlF,
Though we try our best to keep our site PG rated and kid friendly, we do not shy away from posting images of the proverbial “birds and the bees” as well as images of other insects mating, making our Bug Love tag one of our most popular features.  We believe your mating Bumble Bees are most likely the Common Eastern Bumble Bees,
Bombus impatiens, based on images posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp like bug that stung my daughter
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
September 7, 2014 6:02 pm
Hi there! Tonight I went for a walk with my kids and my daughter put her hand on a chain and was stung by this little guy. We are in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. any idea what this bug is?
Signature: Lisa

Leafcutter Bee

Leafcutter Bee

Dear Lisa,
This is a solitary bee in the family Megachilidae, commonly called Mason Bees or Leafcutter (or Leafcutting) Bees.  According to BugGuide:  “Most are leaf-cutters, nesting in ground, in cavities, wood. Tunnels are bored in wood or in the ground. Cell is provisioned with pollen (and nectar?), an egg laid, and cell is sealed over with circular pieces of leaves that fit tightly into cavity.”
  According to Featured Creatures:  “Most leafcutting bees are moderately-sized (around the size of a honey bee, ranging from 5 mm to 24 mm), stout-bodied, black bees. The females, except the parasitic Coelioxys, carry pollen on hairs on the underside of the abdomen rather than on the hind legs like other bees. When a bee is carrying pollen, the underside of the abdomen appears light yellow to deep gold in color.”  WE are sorry to hear about your daughter’s sting, as this is not typical of encounters with Leafcutter Bees.

Leafcutter Bee

Leafcutter Bee

Thank you so much for the info! I am sure it just felt threatened as it would have been squished if my daughter grabbed the chain any harder. Thanks again!!
Lisa

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant Bumble Bee
Location: Northwest Indiana
August 21, 2014 9:08 pm
Hi,
I was out at an arboretum last Saturday and we saw what I believe is a species of bumble bee. It was HUGE. I managed to snag a photo of it, with what I think is a European honey bee in the same shot, so you can see how large it really is
Signature: JV

Bumble Bee

Bumble Bee

Dear JV,
We believe your Bumble Bee is an American Bumble Bee,
Bombus pensylvanicus, based on images and information on Bugguide where it states:  “Has declined severely at the northern margin of its range, where now absent from or at best very rare at many historical localities, but still routinely found in its core range to the south as evidenced by the many Bugguide images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Predatory bee killer!
Location: Tucson, AZ
August 20, 2014 5:39 pm
This enormous predator buzzed down to enjoy its dinner on an elk antler in my yard – what is it?
Signature: Alicia

Giant Robber Fly eats Bee

Giant Robber Fly eats Honey Bee

Dear Alicia,
This is one of the best feeding Robber Fly images we have received all summer.  This is a Giant Robber Fly in the genus
Promachus, a genus well populated in our archives this season due to all the images we have received of Red Footed Cannibalflies.  This is a different member of the genus, and we believe it is Promachus albifacies, a species with no unique common name.  You can compare your individual to this image on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp? eating ?
Location: San diego
August 17, 2014 11:06 am
Hello Bugman,
Saw what looks like to be a white and black wasp hanging around the garden today. First time I have seen a wasp like this, it is fairly large, looks like it might be eating a small frog?
Signature: curious

Bee Killer eats Honey Bee

Bee Killer eats Honey Bee

Dear curious,
This predatory Robber Fly is a Bee Killer,
Mallophora fautrix, and it appears to be eating a Honey Bee.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly eating a bee?
Location: Austin, tx
August 16, 2014 8:49 pm
Hi Bugman!
Found this dragonfly looking insect sucking down a bee in my back yard. Is it a dragonfly? It was definitely drinking the bee. Craziest thing. I have a giant oregano patch bit flower right now and the bees love it. We have a pool so sometimes see dragonflies, but this had some odd features I’d never seen on a dragonfly, like a clear abdomen and a feathery black tuft at the end of his backside. What’s that bug?
Laura
Austin, TX
Signature: Laura

Robber Fly eats Honey Bee

Robber Fly eats Honey Bee

Hi Laura,
You are mistaken in thinking that this is a Dragonfly, though like a Dragonfly, this Robber Fly is an adept predator capable of capturing large prey on the wing.  We believe we have correctly identified your Robber Fly as a member of the genus
Efferia due to its resemblance to many members in the genus, including this unidentified species that is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, there are “110 spp. in our area” and “in our area, the vast majority are restricted to sw. US, with some widely western spp. and just two widespread spp..”  We interpret that to mean that many species are very limited in their distribution.  Alas, we haven’t the necessary skills to attempt a species identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination