Currently viewing the category: "Bees"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sweat Bee/Hover Fly
Location: Linn Co., Oregon
October 18, 2016 11:06 pm
These photos were taken near the end of July on Browder Ridge, Oregon. I would appreciate an
identification.
Signature: D. Gudehus

Bee

Bee

Dear D. Gudehus,
We do not recognize this pretty and distinctive Bee.  We are posting it as unidentified and perhaps we will be able to research its identity when we return to the office.  We are leaving for the airport in two hours.  Perhaps one of our readers will write in with an identification.  It does not appear to be on Common Bee Pollinators of Oregon Crops.

Bee

Beeuni

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Banded Garden Spider?
Location: Hialeah, Florida
September 8, 2016 7:43 am
I *think* this is a female Banded Garden Spider. I first saw it on August 14 and at first thought it was a tree snail due to the appearance of the back. The body was more than an inch long, and it stayed in its web in the same place for weeks, catching bees. I was rather hoping there would be a lot of baby spiders later, but a few weeks later there were 2 days of torrential rain during which time I didn’t look for her & when I did look, she was gone, leaving an intact web and no clue as to her disappearance. The third photo was one of a lucky series- I was taking a picture of her holding a webbed up bee when another bee landed in the web. She was on that second bee so fast I had to scramble to get pics! (I’ll send 3 more of the series in another query.)Spider webbing up caught bee. I chose these out of the series because one shows the bee clearly, and the other two do a fair job of showing the spinnerets in action.
Signature: Curious in Florida

Banded Garden Spider

Banded Garden Spider

Dear Curious in Florida,
Thanks for sending in your wonderful images of a Banded Garden Spider or Banded Orbweaver,
Argiope trifasciata.  They are an excellent addition to our archives.

Banded Garden Spider

Banded Garden Spider

Banded Garden Spider Snares Honey Bee

Banded Garden Spider Snares Honey Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Potter/Mason wasp?
Location: South Florida
September 7, 2016 8:14 pm
Sept 7, 2016 in my backyard I noticed a black and white bee-sized critter nectaring on Spanish Needle flowers. I hadn’t seen its like before and while I think it’s something in the Potter/Mason wasp tribe I was unable to locate any images on the ‘net that matched it.
Signature: Curious in Florida

Modest Cuckoo Leaf-Cutter Bee

Modest Cuckoo Leaf-Cutter Bee

Dear Curious in Florida,
Based on images posted to BugGuide, we believe we have correctly identified your Modest Cuckoo Leaf-Cutter Bee,
Coelioxys modesta.  According to BugGuide, the range is:  “Nebraska to Quebec and the New England states, south to Texas and Florida.”  According to Nature Search:  “This cleptoparasitic bee is approximately 3/8” in length.  The head is large and black with black eyes.  The thorax is black with light gray and black colored fuzz.  The abdomen is black with thin white bands.  Females have a pointed abdomen and males have tooth-like projections at the tip of the cone-shaped abdomen” and “This species is cleptoparasitic on other bees in this family.  The female uses her pointed abdomen to break into Megachile nests.  She removes the host egg and lays her egg in the nest.  The larva kills the occupant and then eats the pollen and nectar stores intended for the offspring of its host.  The female lacks the pollen brush under the abdomen typical of other bees in this family.”

Modest Cuckoo Leaf-Cutter Bee

Modest Cuckoo Leaf-Cutter Bee

Thank you! I had dismissed it as a bee because it was not gathering pollen and because the wings seemed wasplike. Live and learn. :^) I appreciate your generous sharing of information on all the unappreciated creeping, crawling and flying critters of the world.

Modest Cuckoo Leaf-Cutter Bee

Modest Cuckoo Leaf-Cutter Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: weird bug mating with bee
Location: high point, north carolina
August 15, 2016 5:26 pm
so i was sitting in my room and i looked on the screen of my window and saw a large-ish bug mating with a bee (bumble bee i think). the bee was “on bottom” and the larger bug was on top. the large bug had wings and large bulge-y black eyes. it seemed as if the wings went into a point at the bottom so it appeared somewhat in a triangle shape. i don’t know if that type of bug and bees mate often but the mating thing might help.
Signature: -brit

Robber Fly Eats Bee

Robber Fly Eats Bee

Dear -brit,
Bees and other insects do not engage in interspecies mating.  Your image is not ideal for identification purposes, but we believe you have observed a Robber Fly eating a Bee.  Large Robber Flies often prey upon wasps and bees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black Bee
Location: Faribault County, Minnesota
August 9, 2016 12:12 pm
Greetings, What’s that Bug Volunteers!
I am happy to say the bug activity in my Rain Garden is finally picking up. I was wondering how long that would take, so I am now relieved. I watched a Leaf Cutter Bee cut a leaf and fly off with her prize for her nest. I witnessed a Monarch Butterfly lay an egg on a Milkweed stem. I’ve seen TWO Great Black Wasps on the Milkweed. The Soldier Beetles are back in abundance, as are the Cicada Killer Wasps. The Northern Paper Wasps like getting drinks at the birdbath. And the aphids are emerging on the Milkweed so I expect the lacewings and lady beetles will soon arrive, along with those tiny parasitic wasps.
The photos I’ve attached are of a black bee which has proven quite challenging to photograph. I finally caught it on a late Miniature Hollyhock blossom over this past weekend. I like the pollen sacs on the legs. I have Bumble Bees of various sizes in my garden; this though does not appear to be a Bumble Bee.
Can you help me out?
Blessings to one and all,
Wanda J. Kothlow
Signature: Wanda J. Kothlow

Black Bee

Female Two-Spotted Longhorned Bee

Hi again Wanda,
How nice to hear your rain garden is thriving.  We just hear yesterday that Southern California may be expecting a dry “La Niña” winter next winter, though since our predicted wet “El Niño” winter last year was a bust, all bets are off on what will really happen.  In our memory, miniature hollyhocks are about an inch across, which would make this black Bee about half that.  Are we correct?  We suspect this might be a Carpenter Bee, and we are requesting assistance from Eric Eaton as we cannot provide you with anything specific at this time.

Black Bee

Two-Spotted Longhorned Bee

Eric Eaton Responds
Daniel:
Female of the Two-spotted Longhorned Bee, Melissodes bimaculatus.  Males have antennae about twice as long as the females.
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America

Ed. Note:  Here is a link to BugGuide.  There is also some great information on Discover Life.

Two-Spotted Longhorned Bee

Two-Spotted Longhorned Bee

Greetings, Daniel et al!
Yes, your memory is correct. Miniature Hollyhocks (Sidalcea sp) blossoms are an inch or just a tad larger. Quite prolific here and terrific pollinator draws; not as magnetic as Milkweed, Liatris or Monarda, but still good draws.
Speaking of milkweed, I noticed an overabundance of Large Milkweed Bug nymphs last week. And I do mean overabundance. The aphids don’t annoy me since I know my integrated past management system will address that issue. The large Milkweed Bugs though, well I guess I live with them or remove a colony here and there with snippers and a plastic bag …
Exciting to hear I can add a new insect to my list of photos! A female Two-spotted Longhorned Bee! WooHoo! She’s quite a “tease” in that she never landed long enough for me to focus and photograph until recently. Glad she was hungry long enough for me to take her picture!
Hope you are safe where you are in CA; I keep praying for rain where it is needed and dry where it is too wet.
Thank you yet again for your assistance in helping my insect list grow!
Blessings,
Wanda J. Kothlow

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this eating another bug?
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana, usa
August 5, 2016 5:44 pm
Looked like a fat bodie dragonfly but with spiky legs. About two inches long. Eating what looked like a bee. Little furry.
Signature: tittyj

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Honey Bee

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Honey Bee

Dear tittyj,
We are pretty certain your predator is a Robber Fly known as a Red Footed Cannibalfly, and the prey appears to be a Honey Bee.  The tip of the abdomen indicates this individual is a male.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination