Currently viewing the category: "Bees"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: carpenter bee species?
Location: Coastal North Carolina
August 29, 2015 4:57 pm
Found this guy visiting some tall feather celosia alongside several bumblebees. He was orange with shiny abdomen and the strangest yellowish eyes.
Signature: David Hobbs

Eastern Carpenter Bee

Carpenter Bee

Dear David,
Your images bear a strong resemblance to this image of a Southern Carpenter Bee,
Xylocopa micans, that is pictured on BugGuide.

Eastern Carpenter Bee

Carpenter Bee

Thank you so much for the ID.   This is exciting since this is the first time I have seen these in my back yard wildflower haven.  Your work is very appreciated.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Assassin bug?
Location: Beavercreek, OH
August 24, 2015 3:18 am
This bug landed at our table at our local pool. It was carrying a bee & sat there for a few minutes with it’s stinger in the bees head feeding on it.
Signature: Kerry

Hanging Thief eats Robber Fly

Hanging Thief eats Robber Fly

Dear Kerry,
This is not an Assassin Bug.  It is a Robber Fly in the genus
Diogmites, a group known as the Hanging Thieves because they often hang from one leg while feeding.  They take prey on the wing, and this unfortunate Honey Bee stood no chance against such a formidable predator.  While Hanging Thieves and other Robber Flies are considered beneficial predators, they do not distinguish between eating beneficial pollinators and agricultural nuisance insects.  The mouth of the Hanging Thief is adapted to pierce and suck fluids from the body of the prey.  Hanging Thieves do not sting.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tube Nesting Wasp?
Location: Western North Carolina
August 19, 2015 9:37 am
These rather large (1 inch plus) wasps (?) are busily nesting in the larger of my Mason and Leafcutter Bee nesting tubes, and they seal the end of the tube with a mud plug.
Signature: Alan

Giant Resin Bee

Sculptured Resin Bee

Dear Alan,
This is an introduced Giant Resin Bee or Sculptured Resin Bee,
Megachile sculpturalis, and it belongs to the same family as your native Mason and Leafcutter Bees.  According to BugGuide:  “They are opportunistic and nest in existing wooden cavities, rather than excavating their own. Effectively pollinate kudzu, another invasive species.”

Giant Resin Bees

Giant Resin Bees

 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Immature black bug with undeveloped wings
Location: Northridge, CA
August 18, 2015 9:11 pm
Hi,
While working in the yard putting down mulch I came across this bug. We have a ton of Figeater Beetles, so I thought it might be an immature Figeater Beetle, but then noticed that it’s face is more like a carpenter bee. So in short I have no idea what this bug is :)
I live in Northridge, CA. It was hanging out in the bark mulch. It is currently summer and hot.
Thanks so much,
Signature: Angela

Female Valley Carpenter Bee with stunted wings

Female Valley Carpenter Bee with stunted wings

Dear Angela,
Our offices are near downtown Los Angeles and though we are probably ten degrees cooler than you are in Northridge, we too are suffering in the heat.  We commend you on your recognition, because this is a female Valley Carpenter Bee, but we are uncertain what is going on with her stunted wings.  We would like to think that she just completed metamorphosis and her wings eventually expanded, but we fear that some irregularity caused the stunting.  Perhaps she underwent some trauma that prevented the wings from fully developing.

Hi Daniel,
I just wanted to send a thank you! That was so great to learn. I also made a small donation to the site as a thank you. Always love going to the site to figure out who is living in my yard or house with me 😀
Thanks,
Angela

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee / Wasp / Fly?
Location: Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
August 18, 2015 6:17 am
Hi – found this honeycomb with bee-like creatures on a plant in my garden, and previously I was swarmed near that plant and they felt like flies (no sting). Now on closer examination, they look like bees, but a very distinctive colour set? Are these bees? I haven’t seem similar on photos on google?
Signature: Desert Roamer

Honey Bee Hive

Honey Bee Hive

Dear Desert Roamer,
This is a wild Honey Bee hive as opposed to a domestic hive kept by a bee keeper.  Honey Bees are capable of stinging, but they are not aggressive.  Should you decide to eliminate them, you should find a local bee keeper who will remove the hive, preserving it in captivity to help pollinate orchards.

Thanks!
In that case I will leave them if they are not aggressive, as they seem quite happy at the plant there :)
Cheers

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee with Huge Mandibles
Location: Courtice, ontario CANADA
August 12, 2015 7:54 am
Hi Again
Found another type of Bee. This one I have no idea but it was so fuzzy like a teddy bear, really cute until it woke up and it has huge mandibles. Kind of scary but so beautiful.
Seems to be alot of different types of Bees living near this Arena (courtice), Courtice , Ontario off of Prestonvale road.
Signature: Terri

Unknown Bee

Leafcutter Bee

Dear Terri,
As usual, your images are stunning.  We are having difficulty identifying your Bee in the limited time we have this morning, so we have put our energy into creating a posting.  We will contact Eric Eaton to see if he can assist in the identification and meanwhile our readership may weigh in with comments.

Unknown Bee

Leafcutter Bee

Knowing us, we decided to give it one more try this morning.  The golden color and very furry front legs are interesting features, and we believe we found a matching image on the News Today blog where a similar image is identified as Megachile melanophaea and the following information is provided:  “HE MAY look soft and furry – but don’t be fooled. ‘Out of all the species of bees that I’ve photographed during this project, this little guy was the only one that actually looked up at me and bared its mandibles,’ says photographer Clay Bolt. … Female leafcutter bees chew small circles from the edge of leaves, and use these to form tubular cells. Into each tube, she deposits a ball of pollen and an egg. The larva will feed on the pollen when it hatches.  And the flamboyant gold leg manes? “Some males in this group have very furry front legs, which are used to cover the eyes of females during mating,” says Bolt. He speculates that this is to stop the females being distracted by other males during copulation.”  BugGuide indicates you live in the range of the Broad Banded Leafcutter Bee.

Unknown Bee

Leafcutter Bee

Eric Eaton Provides Input
Daniel:
Wow, spectacular images!  All I know is that it is a MALE Megachile sp.  I’ll leave it to John Ascher to determine what subgenus or whatever.  Males of some megachilids have those “fluffy” front legs.
Eric

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination