Currently viewing the category: "Bees"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Orchid Bee
Location: 76016 Arlington, TX
November 29, 2014 2:50 pm
This was taken today in Arlington, TX. We’ve seen several of these today humming around the garden. Temps are unseasonably warm, but will cool down tomorrow.
Signature: Lisa Parisot

Metallic Green Sweat Bee

Metallic Green Sweat Bee

Dear Lisa,
To the best of our knowledge, the Green Orchid Bee is not found in Arlington, Texas.  It is an introduced species and according to BugGuide it is a member of a:  “neotropical group, with 1 sp. established in so. FL and recorded from southernmost TX (Brownsville)”
  This is a Metallic Green Sweat Bee in the subfamily Halictinae, and you can read more about them on BugGuide where it states:  “Most species nest in burrows in banks or in the ground (Augochlora uses partially rotten logs). Some are primitively eusocial; in such cases usually a female guards the entrance to the burrow by plugging it with her head. Generally the main burrow is vertical; it sends horizontal branches, each branch ending in a solitary cell.”  It can be very difficult to identify Metallic Green Sweat Bees to the genus or species level from images. 

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Subject: Giant wood-boring flying insect
Location: Rural Bangladesh
November 20, 2014 7:13 pm
My husband took this picture in rural Bangladesh. He says it was a wood-boring insect, about 3 inches long, and that it died right in front of him (he didn’t kill it). The eyes and wings are just amazing.
Signature: Lisa C.

Carpenter Bee

Carpenter Bee

Dear Lisa,
This amazing insect is a Carpenter Bee in the subfamily Xylocopinae.  The female tunnels in wood, creating several nursery chambers that she provisions with pollen.  She lays an egg in each chamber so that her developing larva will have a food source.

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Subject: First time to see this kind of bee
Location: Flowers on the backyard of the house & also on the farm
November 13, 2014 1:16 pm
Aloha bugman,
Can you identify what kind of bee is this please? Never saw something like this before! Mahalo! :)
Signature: L. Rocknash

Sonoran Carpenter Bee

Sonoran Carpenter Bee

Dear L. Rocknash,
We are guessing by your greeting and closing that you are from Hawaii.  This is a male Carpenter Bee, and we learned on BugGuide that the Sonoran Carpenter Bee,
Xylocopa sonorina, a non-native species, can be found in Hawaii.  Females are black and males a beautiful golden color.  This image from FlickR depicts a male Sonoran Carpenter Bee in Hawaii.

 

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Subject: Four-Toothed Mason Wasp?

Location: Selangor, Malaysia
November 13, 2014 1:45 am
Hi,
I found this one clinging (though it’s dead) to the curtain in the bedroom. The most similar insect I’ve been able to find via google is the four-toothed mason wasp, but it seems to differ quite significantly. What do you make of it?
We live next to a green area (a golf course), including a lake with a seemingly thriving ecosystem.
Thanks in advance!
Signature: Kind regards, Sofia

Possibly Solitary Bee

Megachilid Solitary Bee

Dear Sofia,
There is a superficial similarity between your Hymenopteran and the Four Toothed Mason Wasp, but we believe your individual is a solitary Bee.  We have not been able to identify it.  We will get a second opinion on our speculation that this is a bee.

We write to Eric Eaton
Hi Eric,
This looks like
Megachilinae
to me.  Any opinion?
It is from Malaysia.  Thanks
Daniel

Eric Eaton confirms our suspicion
Daniel:
You are correct.  I submitted the image to the Hymenopterist’s Forum on Facebook to see if anyone recognizes the species.  There are folks from all over the world on that group, so I expect we’ll have an answer shortly….
Eric

Karl makes a similar identification and provides some links to images
Hi Daniel and Sofia:
Based on the wing venation that is so clearly visible in Sofia’s excellent photo, I believe this has to be a Leafcutter or Mason Bee (Family Megachilidae). I wasn’t able to locate an image of this exact bee from Malaysia but I did find several very similar images of bees in the genus Megachile from Thailand, Australia and Kenya. Regards.  Karl

Thank you so much for looking into this! Now I’ve learned something new :)
I did suspect that the similarity to a four-toothed mason wasp was merely superficial, but my google searches were limited by my almost non-existent bug vocabulary and bug knowledge.
Best regards,
Sofia

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Subject: SO curious…

Location: Santa Cruz, Ca.
November 10, 2014 12:46 am
I found this insect drinking nectar with the honey bees in my garden. While my husband cannot see a difference between it and the bees, I see several differences. (If even sounds different when it flies.) It was spotted in Santa Cruz, California in early November. Please enlighten me!
Signature: Amber

Drone Fly (left) with Honey Bee

Drone Fly (left) with Honey Bee

Dear Amber,
You are quite observant.  We especially like your image of the Drone Fly,
Eristalis tenax, with the Honey Bee it mimics in the background.  Drone Flies are in the family Syrphidae and they do not bite nor sting.  See BugGuide for an excellent comparison image.

Drone Fly

Drone Fly

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Subject: Bees or Wasps?
Location: Miami, FL 33165
September 28, 2014 12:03 pm
09/28/2014
I live in Miami, FL 33165 and on 09/25/2014, a swarm of bees (or wasps) appeared in my backyard in the trunk of a dead hollow palm tree which has been used by birds for nesting (4 nesting holes). Our present temperature is high 80’s F during the day and mid-70’s F at night. This has been a very wet summer, including September.
Attached you will find copies of photos I have taken to determine what type of insect it is. If they are bees, how can I find beekeepers in this area that might be interested in picking them up.
Signature: Carmen L. León

Honey Bee Swarm

Honey Bee Swarm

Dear Carmen,
These are Honey Bees, and hollow trees are favored, natural sites for hives.  Periodically, an established hive will produce new queens that swarm with workers in an attempt to relocate and produce a new hive.  This can become a problem for homeowners if the new colony attempts to locate the hive in a chimney or attic of a home, but if this hive is high enough in the tree, we don’t imagine they will cause you any problems.  The Honey Bees will help to pollinate your fruit trees and flowers, and they will be a benefit to your garden.  If you decide that relocation is required, there are probably local beekeepers that will attempt to remove the hive.  Try the yellow pages.  It seems this particular colony is finding your hollow tree quite habitable, so removal of the hive may be difficult without cutting the tree.

Honey Bee Swarm

Honey Bee Swarm

Dear Daniel,
Thanks for your prompt reply.  I’m going to contact local beekeepers who might be interested in removing the hive.  The bees are about 8 feet up but next to the house and I’m afraid of possible stings to my dog, visiting children and myself.
Thank you for your help again,
Carmen

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination