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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Boris and Medea Luna turn Somersaults in the Aquarium
January 5, 2013

Boris & Medea Luna lock jaws.

We haven’t done an aquarium update in quite some time, so we are long overdue.  Boris and Medea Luna have been living in the fifty gallon aquarium for several years now.  They currently share the aquarium with a school of Rummy Nose Tetras, a school of Serpae Tetras, a school of Glowlight Tetras, five golden X-Ray Tetras, some Cardinal and Neon Tetras, six Silver Hatchet Fish, two large Plecostomus, two Indian Killifish (the only non-Amazon fish), a Corydoras Catfish and one odd Tetra.  They continue to spawn erratically, but the Tetras, which are really just small Piranas, always eat the eggs as they are laid.  Boris and Medea Luna attempt to chase the other aquarium dwellers away from the spawning site to no avail.  We stopped trying to raise their young as they were often deformed.  Boris and Medea Luna still fight and court, and Boris has bitten off her pectoral fins much like he did to Lefty many years ago.  Medea Luna is often the aggressor and she often initiates the activities.  Occasionally the Angelfish kill a Tetra that is moving too slowly, but the other fish have learned to avoid the Angelfish when they are defending territory.  

Boris initiates the flip.

The History of Boris and Medea Luna
Boris and Medea Luna, a pair of Angelfish, have been in our care since March 27, 2009, when we brought four Angelfish home from Pasadena Tropical Fish.  Within five days, we had a spawing, but three fish seemed to be involved.  Eventually Boris and Medea Luna proved to be the dominant pair and started to attack the other female, who we eventually named Digitalis.  She and her mate Lefty lived for several years in their own aquarium and they produced numerous spawning before dying in in 2011.  Boris and Medea Luna always lived in a community aquarium with Rams and Cardinal Tetras, and they protected numerous spawings from the other fish in the aquarium.  We always waited for the eggs to hatch before removing the wriggling fry with a turkey baster and raising the fry in a nursery aquarium.

Boris and Medea Luna flipping.

Here are Boris and Medea Luna on their second anniversary in Mount Washington.

Boris and Medea Luna lock and swim toward the surface.

Boris and Medea Luna begin a new cycle.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

May 18, 2012
In the Aquarium by the west window.

Hector (right) and Luna with their first brood

The fry have been free swimming for about a week.  I believe the eggs were laid about two weeks ago, before Paris and Helen laid eggs.  Paris and Helen, the gold pair, are raising a brood of their own.
Algae is growing because I removed the Plecostomus.  As soon as the fry get large enough, I am going to move the plecostomus back to help keep algae under control.  Perhaps I will get a new plecostomus for that aquarium and keep one in each aquarium, but move them all into the tank with Boris and Medea Luna who are no longer bearing pretty spawn.

Fry with Luna

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Aquarium Update:  May 9, 2012
There has been so much change and transition in the aquaria.  First a silver pair of Angelfish paired off and were moved to the aquarium by the window where they are living with their three day free swimming fry.  What I believe is a pair of golden Angelfish (I decided I would name the first gold fish to produce viable fry Paris, be it male or female.  Seems I most likely have a pair of golden Angelfish.  There are wrigglers and also a batch of non viable eggs, but they seem to have formed a relationship with a silver striped Angelfish.  I am reluctant to narrow the tank to two fish until I am sure who laid the viable eggs.  The viable eggs were laid on a piece of slate. The hatchlings were moved.  The three silver Angelfish and one gold fish stayed behind the slate when fry were moved to plant in foreground.  Then more eggs were laid on the plant in the foreground, but I am not sure by which fish.  There is little doubt the pair are the gold fish.  Three of the fish were taken to Tropical Imports, but then the third fish seemed to join the pair.

Paris in the back and Helen on the right.

On the light green leaf on the left in the aquarium is a brood of wrigglers that were moved shortly after I took this photo.  In the foreground are the nonviable eggs turning white.

Helen, probably the female in the pair.

Update:  May 18, 2012
I could tell the fry were hidden in the back of the large plant, however, I couldn’t see them.  Then the fry were moved into view.  As soon as the fry started swimming, I came home to find the silver anglefish, still unnamed, gobbling up swimming fry.  I got a bit nervous and caught him and just dumped him unceremoniously into the aquarium in the bathroom, the nursery aquarium.  A few minutes later, I noticed three fry in the nursery aquarium with him.  I scooped them out with a cup and returned them to Paris and Helen.  I still am not certain if Paris fertilized the eggs.  I think I will keep the striped male until I am certain, however, I may ask Tropical Imports to board him.

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

March 31, 2012
My beautiful adolescent Angelfish are laying eggs, but no eggs have hatched yet.  There were 17 Angelfish in the 40 gallon tall aquarium when things started to get ugly.  A gold male and a small but spunky striped female have laid eggs several times and they are getting aggressive.  His protective behavior was documented in a motion control photograph taken a few weeks ago.
It was several days ago that I realized that when they laid eggs again, the gold member of the pair was the male, not the female.  I believe that is him obeying the rule of thirds at my direction in the attached photograph.  I have decided to name him Paris.

Paris and other Adolescent Angelfish

The pair had begun attacking the eyes of a gravid female who was dropping eggs as she hid behind the piece of slate leaning against the glass.  I moved her with three other striped tankmates and moved them into the 10 gallon nursery tank.  That was Wednesday night.  Yesterday I took them to Tropical Imports and I told Henry to keep an eye on them because I predict they will pair off and lay eggs.  I am pretty certain at least two of the four are males.

Adolescent Angelfish


These are the most beautiful of the final brood produced by Lefty and Digitalis in spring 2011.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

March 5, 2012
There hasn’t been an update on the Angelfish in quite some time, and Lefty’s and Digitalis’ gorgeous offspring have begun to pair off.  I save 17 beauties, 4 gold and the remainder striped.  A gold female is here seen defending her eggs from her tankmates.  She is the blur, captured at 1/8 second in shutter priority mode.

Golden Female Angelfish protects her off-camera eggs

She has a striped mate.  Previously they laid eggs twice on the vertically inclined rock on the right.  No young have hatched from the eggs yet.

Blurred Golden Angelfish

Photo 7 Design Elements
These photos were shot between 10 and 11 AM this past Saturday, March 3, 2012 in Cypress Park.  They represent work shot for assignment 1:  Design Elements.

Balance/Dot

Future Street

Balance/Lines

Some Side Street

Balance/Shape

San Fernando Road

Balance/Texture

San Fernando Road

Balance

North Figueroa Street

Balance/Depth Perception

Cypress Avenue.  The funny thing about this photo is that it is a reshoot.  At some point, when turning the camera on and off, the mode changed from “program” to “manual” after passing through “shutter priority” and “aperture priority” with varying degrees of overexposure.  Upon returning to the market parking lot to reshoot, the shadows had moved in the chosen shot.  This was noticed after reshooting the original composition with the proper exposure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

December 3, 2011 @ 12:33 AM.
We have been experiencing technical difficulties.  On Wednesday afternoon, the Santa Ana winds began to pick up and by 6:30 PM, we noticed transformers blowing and lighting up the sky.  During the night, the power went out four or five times, and shortly after 1 AM Thursday, the howling wind twisted and snapped a large tree near our offices.  Around 8: 40 AM, shortly after leaving for our day jobs, the lights went out at our Mt Washington offices for nearly 36 hours.  Without power, we were unable to answer any emails or to post any new content.  The power returned at about 6:30 PM on Friday, December 2, about an hour before we returned to the offices.  Our first priority was to check on the aquaria and remove the quilts they were wrapped in.  With no electricity and no heat, the aquarium water dropped from the Amazonian 80s to the low 60s despite our having boiled some rain water the night before and adding it to raise the temperature to about 70.  We did that a second time at about 1 PM today, that time boiling about 2 1/2 gallons from each aquarium that was returned hot, again raising the temperature to about 72.  This afternoon the warming was accompanied by the quilt wrap.  Boris and Medea Luna, Lefty and Digitalis’ 16 fledgelings, and the summer spawns all survived.  One small fry in the bathroom died, leaving five siblings from a very small brood.

Boris and Medea Luna July 2011

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination