Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
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Subject: I think it’s a bettle???
Location: South Korea
September 20, 2015 4:55 pm
I’m stationed in South Korea and I found these 2 bugs on a tree this morning. What are they?
Signature: Christian

White Cicadas

White Cicadas

Dear Christian,
Though they are commonly called White Cicadas, your insects are actually Fulgorid Leafhoppers,
Lycorma delicatula, and we frequently get identification requests for the bright red nymphs with bold black and white markings.  Also known as the Spotted Lanternfly, this species was recently reported in Pest News as an invasive exotic species detected in Pennsylvania.  According to Pest News:  “Spotted lanternfly feeds on a variety of host plants including fruit trees, ornamental trees, woody trees, and vines.  Apples, birch, cherry, dogwood, grapes, Korean Evodia, lilac, maple, poplar, stone fruits, and tree-of-heaven are among more than 70 species of hosts attacked by this pest.  Tree-of-heaven, which contains high concentrations of cytotoxic alkaloids, is one of the favorite hosts.  This is probably why spotted lanternfly is considered poisonous and used in traditional Chinese medicine.  Other preferred hosts such as Korean Evodia (Bebe tree) are also used in oriental medicine suggesting that spotted lanternfly has a high preference for hosts that contain toxic secondary metabolites.  Observations in South Korea also indicate that spotted lanternfly appears to have a wider host range early in life as young nymphs and a narrow range as they grow older, especially before egg laying.  Choosing plants with toxic metabolites for egg laying is thought to be a mechanism of defense to protect from natural enemies.  Although grape vine does not have toxic metabolites like these other hosts, spotted lanternfly showed a strong preference in studies conducted in South Korea.  Sugar content of the host plant also appears to play a role in their choice with a preference for hosts containing high sucrose and fructose content.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Small grasshopper like bug
Location: Hobart indiana
September 20, 2015 4:47 pm
These little guys like hanging out on my hibiscus leaves. I find them strange because they seem to shoot little droplets from there rear ends.
Signature: Mike

Candystriped Leafhoppers

Candystriped Leafhoppers

Dear Mike,
These Candystriped Leafhoppers,
Graphocephala coccinea, are not even closely related to Grasshoppers.  Leafhoppers are more closely related to Cicadas, and they are classified along with Aphids and True Bugs in the order Hemiptera, insects with mouths adapted to piercing and sucking fluids.  Like Aphids, they release honeydew, which is the widely used name for the droplets you observed.  Like many members of their order, Candystriped Leafhoppers are considered pest species in the garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you identify the bug in this picture?
Location: Jenison, Michigan
September 3, 2015 6:30 pm
My friends and I found this tiny bug and were trying to find out what is. Can you help us?
Signature: Ashley

Leafhopper

Leafhopper

Dear Ashley,
Despite a similar appearance, we are relatively certain your Leafhopper is not
Idiocerus pallidus, though this image from BugGuide does look somewhat similar to your individual.  We are a bit tired right now after a long day, and we cannot research this any longer this evening.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Looks like a cicada nymph, but it’s wingless and has pointed rear.
Location: Sarnia, Ontario. Canada
August 13, 2015 9:59 am
This bug weirded me out. It was on inside of van window, then I pulled over to inspect it. It looked like a crescent moon with legs and danced side to side. I managed to get this picture before it jumped on my shirt and my hubby knocked it off. Because I screamed so loud, I didn’t want to get on ground to look for it again. I didn’t want people thinking the wrong thing, so I drove away.
Signature: Tolerant of bugs I know of, terrified of unknown.

Leafhopper Nymph:  Coelidia olitoria

Leafhopper Nymph: Coelidia olitoria

Dear Tolerant,
We quickly identified your Leafhopper Nymph as
Coelidia olitoria on BugGuide, and this BugGuide posting mentions the side to side dance you witnessed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Winged Bug
Location: Montecito, California
August 7, 2015 4:12 pm
We found this beautiful winged bug in our house in Montecito, California August 7, 2015. It is about 3/8″ long, and when we touched it, it kind of jumped with a small clicking noise.
Signature: Derek Westen

Issid Planthopper

Issid Planthopper

Dear Derek,
Based on this BugGuide image, we believe we have correctly identified your Issid Planthopper as a member of the genus
NaethusBugGuide lists five members of the genus found in California, but does not provide much information.  Though it has nothing to do with entomology or with the Planthopper, iNaturalist provides this etymological information on the origin of the genus name:  “Neaethus was a river falling into what is now the Gulf of Taranto, where the ships of the Greeks were burned by the women of Troy whom they had led captive.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Very small yellow bug
Location: Central Ontario canada
July 26, 2015 4:09 pm
What is this?
Signature: Todd

Aphid

Aphid

Dear Todd,
This is some species of Aphid.  We found a posting on the Backyard Arthropod Project that looks like your Aphid, and links to BugGuide’s pages on the subgenus 
Lineomyzocallis and to the genus Myzocallis, both of which are reported in Canada.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination