Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red black bug
Location: Himachal Pradesh India, Western Himalayas.
July 6, 2013 11:51 pm
Hi Bugman. Please identify this bug from western Himalayas. Thank you.
Signature: Harsha S

Unknown Hemipterans

Froghoppers

Dear Harsha,
We do not recognize your insects but we can tell you that they are Hemipterans, most likely Free Living Hemipterans in the suborder Auchenorrhyncha which includes Cicadas and Treehoppers.  We will post your image and we will continue to research, but perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in a more specific identification.

Thanks for a quick reply Daniel. I had guessed they are closely related to hoppers. I could not find a picture on web similar to one I had clicked. I hope your veteran researchers will help me. Thanks.

Update:  July 24, 2013
Thanks to a reader’s comment, we now know that this Froghopper or Spittle Bug is
Cosmoscarta bispecularis.  Bold Systems Taxonomy Browser does not have any information.  Alas we cannot read the content of gaga.biodiv.tw, but it appears to be a somewhat credible source of information.  This Spittle Bug did appear on a Hong Kong Stamp, and according to World Stamp News:  “This brightly-coloured Spittle Bug is largely tangerine red with different sized black dots seen on its pronotum and wings. Some of these may join to form broad black bands, with the black spots at the wing tips merging as well. It does not produce any sounds. The adults can often be found between May and September, and, whilst mainly inhabiting shrublands, this uncommon type of Spittle Bug tends to appear in Tai Mo Shan and Ma On Shan as well.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Figured this one out yet?
Location: Northern L.A. County, CA, USA
July 6, 2013 12:05 pm
Hi,
Just wondered if you had a chance to check out this tiny bug yet ? Still curious, wanted to post it on a nature site but need to know a little about it first.
Thank you,
-Denise
Signature: Denise

Possibly Issid Planthopper

Possibly Issid Planthopper

Hi Denise,
This is a Planthopper in the superfamily Fulgoridae and possibly the family Issidae.  We feel it most resembles the members of the genus
Thionia pictured on BugGuide.  While we feel confident we are correct about the superfamily Fulgoridae, we would not hedge any bets on any more specific identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Beetle
Location: SW Indiana
July 2, 2013 6:31 pm
This is about 1/2 the size of a pea. It was sitting on a branch in the bush outside my front door. on 2 July. I thought it was a spider at first. Not sure what the ’cotton’ is coming out the rear. It did fly off.
Signature: jim

Planthopper Nymph

Planthopper Nymph

Hi Jim,
This is not a beetle.  It is the nymph of a Planthopper or Treehopper, a freeliving Hemipteran.  We will attempt to provide a species identification in the future.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ants collecting honeydew from aphids
Location: Niagara, Ontario, Canada
July 1, 2013 6:05 pm
Hello there,
I came across these very busy ants on the weekend. While I knew they collected the sweet secretions from aphids (which I have heard called ”honeydew”), I had never actually seen them in the process. Hopefully in this photo you can make out the aphids and the ants coming and going. This was at the top of a fair-sized thistle. Anyway, I thought you might like it for your collection.
Signature: Alison

Ants and Aphids

Ants and Aphids

Hi Alison,
We don’t know what species of Ant nor Aphid you have.  We are rather fond, though, of the common name often given to Aphids of Ant Cows.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bright red and blue bug
Location: DeKalb, IL
June 29, 2013 10:05 am
This little guy is sitting on a sunflower leaf in DeKalb, IL. Photo taken Saturday, June 29.
Signature: Jeff

Candystriped Leafhopper

Candystriped Leafhopper

Dear Jeff,
This colorful creature is a Candystriped Leafhopper,
Graphocephala coccinea.  Though they are quite lovely, Candystriped Leafhoppers are members of a family that are generally not that welcome in the garden.  They are in the order Hemiptera, a group of insects with piercing and sucking mouthparts.  The Candystriped Leafhopper will such the nourishing fluids from plants.  While we do not know the specifics on this particular species, BugGuide does indicate on the family page that:  “nymphs and adults feed on sap of above-ground stems or leaves of plants; some species are more host-specific than others” and “Several species are serious crop pests; some transmit plant pathogens (viruses, mycoplasma-like organisms, etc.)”  We doubt that Candystriped Leafhoppers are ever plentiful enough to present a problem in the home garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red and yellow bugs
Location: Southwestern Ohio
June 11, 2013 3:09 pm
I found the little yellow and red bugs on the underside of the leaves on my tulip trees. I just noticed them today. Most of the leaves are covered in these little suckers. I live in southwestern Ohio.
Signature: MrsH1978

Aphids

Aphids

Dear MrsH1978,
You really do have little suckers.  These are Aphids and they have sucking mouthparts that they use to suck the juices from plants.  Spraying the plants with soapy water is a natural way to help control their numbers.

Aphids

Aphids


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination