Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White pupae?
Location: Portsmouth, VA
November 13, 2015 9:20 am
Good morning from Tidewater area, Virginia.
I found these white pupaeish looking things on an ornamental bamboo plant outside the hospital parking garage. At first I thought they were bird poop but the clusters looked less planned.
Are they moths-in-training perhaps?
Signature: Dia from Chesapeake

Cottony Cushion Scale

Cottony Cushion Scale

Dear Dia,
These are Cottony Cushion Scale insects,
Icerya purchasi, and you can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “The white fluted part of the insect is an egg sac that can contain up to 1000 eggs. The insect is hermaphroditic, producing sperm that can fertilize its own ova, but in an alternate reproductive strategy it can also make winged males that can fertilize the female part of other individuals.  When it first appeared in the w. US it was a major pest of Citrus crops. In CA, around 1889, it was an early success story for biological control by beneficial ladybird beetles (Rodolia cardinalis). (Full story) The control was so successful that in 1893 a Florida nurseryman asked for some of the beneficials to be sent to FL, to test as a control for other scale insects. The scale was included in the shipment as food for the beetles, and thus accidentally introduced to FL citrus.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Douglasville ga
November 10, 2015 2:15 pm
These bugs are all over a lily plant that is going dormant for the winter… They are mostly on the underside of the leaves?!?
Signature: Angela M

Aphids

Aphids

Dear Angela
Your plants are infested by Aphids.  Aphids are considered especially troublesome by gardeners as they feed by piercing the surface of the plant and then sucking fluids.  Aphids also reproduce without mating, and a female Aphid can give live birth to young.  The mature winged Aphids are generally both sexes and they can also reproduce by mating.

Aphids

Aphids

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant snowball mealy bug
Location: Mount Cotton Qld 4165
October 31, 2015 7:08 pm
Just read something about mealy bug on this site and thought I’d share a different coloured one I found on my Leptospermum
Signature: Glen Beard

Snowball Large Mealybug

Snowball Large Mealybug

Dear Glen,
Thanks so much for providing a new image of the Snowball Large Mealybug in the genus
Monophlebulus.  It surely is much larger and more colorful than the Mealybugs we have in North America, which is why we were stumped the first time we received a submission.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identify
Location: 95076 LaSelva Beach, CA
October 23, 2015 9:25 am
Found quite a few of these on a tree in the front yard. I tbink they are hurting the tree. How to get rjd of them and what kind of bug is it?
Signature: Bev

Torpedo Bug

Torpedo Bug

Dear Bev,
This is an introduced Torpedo Bug,
Siphanta acuta, a species native to Australia.  According to BugGuide:  “not considered a pest in CA; considered a pest of banana, citrus, coffee, guava, macadamia, and many ornamentals in HI.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Whats this bug?
Location: Hillsboro, MO
October 21, 2015 2:58 pm
I was feeding my
Cows and after i was done i went to sit down on the fourwheeler and then saw this bug land on it dont know what it is please help?!
Signature: I dont know this question?

Is there anyone working for this site?

Please understand that we have a very small staff that does this as a labor of love. We cannot answer all submissions (not by a long shot). But we’ll do the best we can!

Giant Bark Aphid

Giant Bark Aphid

We really do try to respond to as many requests as possible.  Thanks for resubmitting your image.  This is a Giant Bark Aphid,  Longistigma caryae, which you can find pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “This is the largest aphid in North America with adults averaging about 1/4 inch long. They also have long legs which makes them appear even larger. Males and some females are winged but egg laying females are wingless. They are brown with black markings (giving them somewhat of a mottled appearance) and have short, black cornicles. When alive they are often partially covered with a bluish white, waxy secretion. ” BugGuide also notes that host plants include:  “American elm, pin oak, live oak, post oak, blackjack oak, pecan, hickory, sycamore, and golden rain tree. Other trees which might be infested include maple, basswood, birch, beech, walnut, chestnut, and willow. ”

Wow thankyou so much! And sorry about the rush. Awrsome website thankyou for the help

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unique bug
Location: City park of Iron Mountain Michigan
October 23, 2015 9:19 pm
I was at the park with my son, a tiny little bug landed on me. I have never seen this type before, I tried to find out what it is but am having no luck. I am hoping this site will help me find my answer. It’s getting to the end of fall.
Signature: Amanda

Woolly Aphid

Woolly Aphid

Dear Amanda,
Your insect is a Woolly Aphid in the subfamily Eriosomatinae, and you can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Nearly all members of this subfamily alternate between host plants, generally with a woody primary host (on which overwintering eggs are laid, and on which some species induce galls) and an herbaceous secondary host.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination