Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
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Subject: found this
Location: Oaxaca, Mexico
July 27, 2013 6:56 pm
I found this in Mexico and would like to know the type of bug this is.
Signature: Dario

Mating Treehoppers

Mating Horseshoe-Shaped  Treehoppers

Dear Dario,
These are Treehoppers in the family Membracidae, and according to BugGuide, they: “differ from related families in having a large pronotum that extends back over the abdomen and (often) covers the head; many species appear humpbacked or thorn-like; others have spines, horns or keels.”  Your individuals are among the most strangely shaped we have seen photos of.  It appears you have also photographed a mating pair.  We found it identified as a Horseshoe-Shaped Treehopper,
Sphongophorus ballista, on The Featured Creature

Horseshoe-Shaped Treehopper

Horseshoe-Shaped Treehopper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is it a moth or a wasp?
Location: Puyo, Pastaza, Ecuador (Amazon)
July 12, 2013 1:13 pm
Hi, I was in the jungle in Ecuador. We were in the city of Puyo and this bug flew in at night. It looks like a moth, but I asked and someone said it was a wasp. I can’t find any info about it online. Thanks.
Signature: Jeff

Lanternfly

Lanternfly

Hi Jeff,
This is neither a wasp nor a moth.  It is a Lanternfly or Peanut Headed Bug,
Fulgora laternaria, and there are some local superstitions regarding this unusual relative of Cicadas and Leafhoppers.  Years ago we uncovered the superstion of the Machaca, a local name for the Lanternfly in some areas of South America.  The superstition is that if bitten by a Machaca, a person must have sex within 24 hours, or die.  Though we rarely quote Wikipedia, we cannot resist perpetuating this interesting rumor:  “In several countries, such as Ecuador, Colombia and Venezuela, there exists the myth that if somebody is bitten by the machaca, he or she must have sex within 24 hours to prevent an otherwise incurable death. The popular belief in Bolivia (Santa Cruz de la Sierra) is that it is a dangerous insect dependant on its wing colours but the insect is actually harmless to people.”  Perhaps that is the reason you were informed that this was a wasp.  To the best of our knowledge, Lanternflies do not bite.  When they were initially discovered by westerners, it was believed that they were bioluminescent, hence the name Lanternfly, but in actuality, they do not glow in the dark.

Thank you. Now I understand why I couldn’t find any info on it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Two-striped Planthopper (Acanalonia bivittata) nymph ?
Location: Naperville, IL
July 9, 2013 7:51 pm
Hi Daniel~
From what I’ve read here, planthopper nymphs can be nearly impossible to identify to the species level, but could these fuzz-dragging little creatures be two-striped planthoppers? They remind me of miniature crustaceans or snails, and I almost always overlook them by mistaking them for dried-up flower detritus. I’ve been inspecting my milkweed patch very carefully these past weeks, however, in the hopes of finding some Monarch eggs. Although a few females have visited my milkweed lately, they seem interested only in nectaring and not laying. So I have to content myself with the other abundant life forms thereupon. Have a lovely week!
Signature: Dori Eldridge

Planthopper Nymph

Planthopper Nymph

Hi Dori,
We can neither confirm nor deny the species identity of this Planthopper nymph, but we suppose it might be the Two-Striped Planthopper based on photos posted to BugGuide.

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Subject: Red black bug
Location: Himachal Pradesh India, Western Himalayas.
July 6, 2013 11:51 pm
Hi Bugman. Please identify this bug from western Himalayas. Thank you.
Signature: Harsha S

Unknown Hemipterans

Froghoppers

Dear Harsha,
We do not recognize your insects but we can tell you that they are Hemipterans, most likely Free Living Hemipterans in the suborder Auchenorrhyncha which includes Cicadas and Treehoppers.  We will post your image and we will continue to research, but perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in a more specific identification.

Thanks for a quick reply Daniel. I had guessed they are closely related to hoppers. I could not find a picture on web similar to one I had clicked. I hope your veteran researchers will help me. Thanks.

Update:  July 24, 2013
Thanks to a reader’s comment, we now know that this Froghopper or Spittle Bug is
Cosmoscarta bispecularis.  Bold Systems Taxonomy Browser does not have any information.  Alas we cannot read the content of gaga.biodiv.tw, but it appears to be a somewhat credible source of information.  This Spittle Bug did appear on a Hong Kong Stamp, and according to World Stamp News:  “This brightly-coloured Spittle Bug is largely tangerine red with different sized black dots seen on its pronotum and wings. Some of these may join to form broad black bands, with the black spots at the wing tips merging as well. It does not produce any sounds. The adults can often be found between May and September, and, whilst mainly inhabiting shrublands, this uncommon type of Spittle Bug tends to appear in Tai Mo Shan and Ma On Shan as well.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Figured this one out yet?
Location: Northern L.A. County, CA, USA
July 6, 2013 12:05 pm
Hi,
Just wondered if you had a chance to check out this tiny bug yet ? Still curious, wanted to post it on a nature site but need to know a little about it first.
Thank you,
-Denise
Signature: Denise

Possibly Issid Planthopper

Possibly Issid Planthopper

Hi Denise,
This is a Planthopper in the superfamily Fulgoridae and possibly the family Issidae.  We feel it most resembles the members of the genus
Thionia pictured on BugGuide.  While we feel confident we are correct about the superfamily Fulgoridae, we would not hedge any bets on any more specific identification.

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Subject: Unknown Beetle
Location: SW Indiana
July 2, 2013 6:31 pm
This is about 1/2 the size of a pea. It was sitting on a branch in the bush outside my front door. on 2 July. I thought it was a spider at first. Not sure what the ’cotton’ is coming out the rear. It did fly off.
Signature: jim

Planthopper Nymph

Planthopper Nymph

Hi Jim,
This is not a beetle.  It is the nymph of a Planthopper or Treehopper, a freeliving Hemipteran.  We will attempt to provide a species identification in the future.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination