Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: small insects larger than a flea but jump like fleas
Location: North DFW, TX
November 30, 2013 3:29 pm
Hello bugman,
I have scoured your site to try and find something similar to the bugs that cover my home and do their best to get inside. The closest thing I have come to in all your articles is the Springtail, however, no picture of a Springtail looks like the bugs I am having a problem with. I live in the Dallas, TX area and these bugs first appeared when it was about 85 degrees Fahrenheit outside. It has been cooling down lately with highs in the low 40’s and they’d seemed to have disappeared but today the high got just above 50 degrees and bam they are back. They are small bugs that jump, not fly. Although it appears that they have wings on their back they do not fly, they crawl rather slowly and jump from time to time. When they land, say on my arm, they may begin to crawl or may stay still but I can swat them or brush them off with little effort, they don’t even try to get out of the way, almost like they can’t see. They are also very fragile, if I try to b rush them off of a surface they just smush and smear instead of slide off the surface (including flat smooth surfaces like glass). They are small enough to fit through screens on a window but they then just seem content to chill out on the screen, not super active. They are however plentiful and when I open my sliding glass door on the back porch it seems that the breeze that occurs brings at least 5-10 in and they grab onto my clothes or the curtains or the inside of the door. I hope this helps.
Signature: Ross

Probably Leafhopper or Spittle Bug

Probably Leafhopper or Spittle Bug

Hi Ross,
We cannot make a definitive identification because of the lack of clarity and the poor quality of your photo, however, based on your description and the outline of the insect in the photo, we believe this is some type of Free Living Hemipteran, like a Leafhopper or Spittle Bug.  We have many native species, however, there are increasing numbers of invasive species that are being introduced from exotic lands, and once established, they have no natural enemies.  Many Leafhoppers and other Hemipterans are considered to be significant agricultural pests.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Type of green bug?
Location: San Gabriel valley area
November 27, 2013 2:23 pm
We found about 20 of these bugs (about a quarter of an inch long) among some tomato plants. At first we thought we’d come across ladybug larvae but saw that the casings actually had ”spiky things” (as my 6-year old called it) coming out of them. It’s not until we examined the casings further that we saw these green bugs among the tomato stalks.
My son asked what types of bugs they were (I’m pretty good at identifying most bugs) but this one had me stumped. I thought it was some type of leaf cutter bug, but when I looked it up, all I found were Leaf Cutter Ants.
Thnx!
Signature: ?

Keelbacked Treehopper

Keelbacked Treehopper

The Keelbacked Treehopper, Antianthe expansa, is a significant garden pest on tomato and other plants in the family, including eggplant and peppers.  The spiny insects you describe are the immature nymphs.  Both adults and nymphs have piercing mouthparts adapted to sucking nutrient rich fluids from the plants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery bug
Location: Bagnara island Essequibo River Guyana
November 5, 2013 4:36 am
Dear bug man,
I stumbled upon your site while trying to identify this bug…
Or is it a misplaced trout fly fishing lure?
I took the picture yesterday 11/04/13 on Bagnara Island ,which is on the Essequibo River (near Bartica) in Guyana. It was on a tree in deep jungle area and was about 1 1/2 inches long.
Signature: Lindsey

Fulgorid Leafhopper

Fulgorid Leafhopper

Hi Lindsey,
We opened your email yesterday and we could have written back to you immediately that this is a Leafhopper in the family Fulgoridae, and that the white tail is a waxy secretion produced by many members of its family, but we wanted to provide a more thorough identification with links.  This morning, we first located an image on Animals and Earth, but there was no more specific information, nor was there any additional information on Ardea.  Then we found an image on FlickR that identifies it as possibly a member of the genus
Pterodictya.  Following that genus name to Learn About Butterflies shows a similar, but obviously different species.

Thanks so much!
It’s a VERY cool bug !

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow Bug
Location: Detroit, MI
October 30, 2013 4:05 pm
Found these on my back porch today and I have no idea what they are. I tend to have a lot of lady bugs in the backyard but this doesn’t look like a lady bug. This was taken in Detroit, MI. Today (October 30th). And there was a bunch of them in various sizes. Some super tiny like the tip of a pen and others about 2-3 times that size…so bigger than the babies but still small.
Signature: Mari

Milkweed Aphid

Milkweed Aphid

Hi Mari,
This is an Aphid.  If you have plenty of Lady Beetles, they must have a ready food supply, and they prey upon Aphids.  We believe your Aphid is a Milkweed Aphid.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug on tree in Florida
Location: Naples, FL
October 19, 2013 4:45 pm
Hello there, in the yard of my friends in Florida, they discovered a strange bug in their tree, they went to multiple places but couldn’t find out what it is. Do you know?
Signature: Nikki

Thorn Treehoppers

Thorn Treehoppers

Hi Nikki,
These are Thorn Treehoppers,
Umbonia crassicornis, which we identified thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  There are many Treehoppers from around the world that escape visual detection because they mimic thorns and twigs.  Your photo contains both adults and nymphs.  According to BugGuide:  “The female actively tends her brood or colony of 15-50 individuals” and “U. crassicornis has been the subject of studies on parental care and communication.” 

Thorn Treehoppers

Thorn Treehoppers

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Very weird white bugs
Location: San Jose, California, US
October 14, 2013 11:49 am
Hello,
My daughter found those little guys on a bush near our home. Initially I didn’t even recognize them as bugs – they looked that strange. I searched all over the net for ”weird white bugs”, ”white and brown larvae”, and anything else I could think of, but as you can probably guess this didn’t help at all…
Any idea what this might be – can you point me in the right direction?
Regards,
Signature: Alex

Cottony Cushion Scale

Cottony Cushion Scale

Dear Alex,
The good news is we can identify your bug, and the bad news is that you have an infestation of Cottony Cushion Scale.
  For advice on how to control the Cottony Cushion Scale, you can try the UC Davis Integrated Pest Management System where it states:  “Cottony cushion scale, Icerya purchasi, can infest a number of woody ornamentals and certain crops (Figure 1). Common hosts in California are citrus, cocculus, nandina, and pittosporum. Its cottony egg sac and profuse honeydew production make cottony cushion scale easy to spot in the landscape.”

Cottony Cushion Scale

Cottony Cushion Scale

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination