Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
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Subject: Tick-like bug
Location: San Francisco, CA
March 3, 2016 6:46 pm
Hey The Bugman,
Wondering if you can help me id this bug. Sorry, it’s not the best quality pic. One pic is up close, the other is so that you can get an idea of the scale. I found the bug in my back yard on a calla lily. You’ll also see that there’s a smaller bug near it. I’m most curious about the larger bug.
Any ideas?
Thanks!
Signature: StormMiguel

Aphid on a Calla Lily

Aphid on a Calla Lily

Dear StormMiguel,
This is an Aphid and we do not believe its diet, which consists of sucking fluids from plants, is limited to the calla lily.  The other, smaller insect, appears to be a Psocid.

Aphid and possible Psocid

Aphid and possible Psocid

Thank you so much! I never would have guessed it was an aphid – as big as it was. I was worried it might be a tick.
I will make a donation to your site. Sorry that I can only afford $10 at this time.
Your help is greatly appreciated!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird insect
Location: New Delhi India
March 1, 2016 11:44 pm
Hi I am Supriya I live in New Delhi India
There is this weird species of bugs that i ve noticed in the area where i live.
These bugs are seasonal and are seen only during February to May and die when the summer is at its peak.
There is absolutely no pesticide that will kill them unless of course squishing which is really gross because there is a disgusting yellow fluid coming out of them and the stain from that fluid lasts like forever.
I ve seen multitudes of them in areas where there are many peepal trees (u call it peepal in india)
I will be really grateful if u could help me identify them.
Signature: Supriya

Mite we believe

Probably a Mealy Bug

Dear Supriya,
We believe this is some species of Mite, but we cannot find any images to confirm that suspicion.  We have requested assistance in the identification.  It could also be some immature form of something other than a Mite.

Mite, we believe

Probably a Mealy Bug

Eric Eaton confirms comment
Daniel:
It is definitely *not* a mite.  I suspect it is something related to mealybugs, but not knowing the Indian fauna that well, I can’t be 100% positive.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery Green Eggs on Flowering Plum Tree
Location: St. George, UT, United States
March 3, 2016 4:49 pm
I was examining the new flowers on my flowering plum tree when I noticed these little green eggs. As you can see, they are rather easy to notice against the dark leaves of the tree. I would like to know if they are helpful or harmful, and how to get rid of them if they are bad. Thanks!
Signature: – Ami D.

Aphids

Aphids

Dear Ami,
Though they are quite small, the “green eggs” you observed are actually Aphids.  In addition to normal sexual reproduction, Aphids are also capable of reproducing without mating and laying eggs.  According to BugGuide:  “Over-wintering eggs hatch in the spring into wingless females. These wingless females are parthenogenetic (reproduce without fertilization) and hold eggs in their bodies to give birth to living young. Their offspring are similar to the females, but some develop wings. Near autumn male and female wingless forms are born. These mate and the females lay fertilized overwintering eggs. Males can be winged or wingless; parthenogenetic females are usually wingless. In warm climates, living young may be produced continually.”  Aphids are considered pest insects by most gardeners.  They have sucking mouthparts and they feed on fluids in plants, robbing the plant of both nutrition and moisture.  Though we don’t normally provide extermination advice, in our own garden we try to control Aphids by spraying infested plants with mild, soapy water.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Lichen Mimic
Location: Rancha Naturalista, Costa Rica.
February 21, 2016 10:00 am
Hello,
We encountered this lichen mimic hemipteran in Costa Rica 10 days ago. Can you help in identifying it please.
I tried previously to submit, but have now reduced the size of a single file.
Thanks
Hugh
Signature: Hugh Woodland

Lichen Mimic Hemipteran

Lichen Mimic Fulgorid Planthopper

Hi Hugh,
How large was this Hemipteran?  It resembles a Lace Bug in the family Tingidae, but we could not locate any images of similar looking Lichen Mimic Lacebugs from Costa Rica on the internet.  Lace Bugs are quite small.  We would not rule out that it is some species of Planthopper from the superfamily Fulgoroidea.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with an identity than we have had.

Hi Daniel,
It was 1.5, maybe 2 cm long. I couldn’t find anything on the net either!
Hugh

That is too big to be a Lace Bug.

Comment from Hugh:  August 11, 1016
With the help of Dr Jim Lewis of the Museo Nacional of Costa Rica and Dr Jan Janzen this has been identified as Sinuala tuberculata in the Fulgoridae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spruces with tiny scale on stem.
Location: Pennsylvania 19446
February 7, 2016 11:04 am
There is an area of several miles with Colarado Spruce and White Pine decline. The White Pines have Eriophyid Mites and Pine Oystershell scale. The Spruces also have Eriophyid Mites and a scale that looks smaller and different than spruce bud scale. Any ideas?
Signature: Chris

Scale Insect on Spruce

Scale Insect on Spruce

Dear Chris,
We have tried several times to find information on Scale Insects that attack spruce, but to no avail.  We could really use a Hemipteran expert to assist with this ID.

Scale Insect on Spruce

Scale Insect on Spruce

Scale Insect on Spruce

Scale Insect on Spruce

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s the insect that came as a bonus with my Christmas Tree?
Location: Austin, Texas
February 1, 2016 2:41 pm
Hello there,
For the second time in my life I have managed to purchase a live Christmas tree that weeks later developed an insect issue. This time the insect is different than the first. In my Google search to determine what it was this year, I came across your site and another individual’s issue with a Christmas tree pest–which for them turned out to be the Giant Conifer Aphid.
Thanks to their picture and your site I now know what my insect was the first time. Now I’m wondering what this new one is. The aphids never left the tree and I didn’t notice them until I was taking it down. Those were also on a different type of tree for me–a Fraser Fir.
This year I bought a rare type of tree–a Natural Noble. While Noble Firs are common enough for purchasing, Natural Nobles are not–at least not where I live. It’s a beautiful and expensive tree that I discovered at a particular local nursery in Austin, Texas. I’d never seen one available before at a Christmas tree stand or a nursery. This is now the 3rd year I’ve bought this type of tree but the first time it has come with bugs.
The other night (4-5 weeks after purchasing the tree) I noticed what I thought was a large mosquito in my kitchen. Then I noticed a second one. Then the lightbulb went off in my mind to go look at the trunk of the tree as this time of year there aren’t mosquitos. Yep, sure enough there were insects parading up and down the trunk, in different sizes. They were fast movers. While the image may make them appear large they really aren’t. Like I said, they look about like a giant mosquito.
They are winged, or at least many of them were, but I never saw them flying. They were either dead under the tree or dead in another room. The ones on the trunk were very active but not flying. I don’t think those had wings or were so juvenile they couldn’t be seen yet. Overall they’re pretty fragile and when you touch a dead one its legs cling to the skin.
I looked online quite a bit for insects that come in with Christmas trees but couldn’t find anything that looked like this or that had wings. Any idea what this is?
Signature: Michele (Austin, Tx)

Giant Conifer Aphids

Giant Conifer Aphids

Hi Michele,
A living Christmas Tree is host to many creatures that continue to develop in the warm indoor conditions of the heated home.  For the past few years, we have gotten submissions of Giant Conifer Aphids in the genus
Cinara plaguing homemakers.  Your image depicts winged adult Giant conifer Aphids similar to the one in this BugGuide image.

Hello Daniel,
Thank you for the positive identification and your very timely response. I’m so sorry that I didn’t offer you more of a challenge. You get emailed about these bugs a lot and I was convinced they were something other than the Giant Conifer Aphid. These winged adults look so different in size and shape from what I experienced the first time.
Nonetheless, thank you again for taking the time to respond to me. I’ve had a lot of fun perusing your website.
-Michele

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination