Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug with feelers
Location: Pretoria, South Africa.
January 25, 2014 9:37 am
Ni am wondering if you can identify this little bug for me. He was on our table at a restaurant in Pretoria, South Africa and is very small
Signature: Dianne

Planthopper Nymph

Planthopper Nymph

Hi Dianne,
This is some species of Planthopper nymph, and there are many similar looking nymphs on the Brisbane Insect website.

Planthopper Nymph

Planthopper Nymph

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: long horn ball bearer
Location: Guamal, Meta, Colombia, South America
January 7, 2014 12:33 pm
Greetings Bugman! im incredibly pleased to have found one of these again and this time with macro gear at hand. This critter was in the the eastern Llanos (plains) of Colombia in early January . It is about 1 cm in size. I had seen one of these in another part of Colombia a few years back but only had a normal lens with me. At the time i had no idea what i was looking at before it flew (or leapt) off! I can’t find any pictures of a similar specimen anywhere although it must be a close relative to Bocydium globulare. what are the odds of this being a new species? Thank you!
Signature: Nelson O Saarni

Treehopper

Ant-Mimic Treehopper

Hi Nelson,
This is an amazing looking Treehopper.  Many species of Treehoppers have projections that resemble thorns.  We will try to research the species tomorrow.

Treehopper

Ant-Mimic Treehopper

Update:  The more we look at these photos, the more we are struck by the resemblance to an Ant that the projections have.  Ants are symbiotic with many honeydew producing Hemipterans as evidenced by this FlickeR posting.  We pursued that idea in the web search and we discovered this Ant Mimic Treehopper, Cyphonia clavata, on FlickR.  We verified the name of the Insect Museum website as well as on the Fauna of Paraguay website.  Perhaps being able to mimic an unpalatable Ant helps to protect the more tasty Treehopper.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Christmas Tree bugs
Location: Mid Michigan
January 2, 2014 4:53 pm
I think I saw what looks like the bugs in my house from my Christmas tree but I could not see where it said how to get rid of them. Right now, I am only seeing the bugs around my windows, all around my windows and every window in my house including the second level in my house. The majority of them are on the window by the tree, which is a black spruce tree.
Will they go away once the tree is removed? Do they bite? I have a dog, will they attach her?
Should I dispose of my tree skirt. What is the best way to get rid of them in my house? I didn’t notice them until I had all the bulbs off the tree and put away.. Could they be on my bulbs and do I need to get them all out again? I am freaking out a little from these ugly things and need to get rid of them asap! Thank you for your help and recommendations.
Signature: Peggy

Giant Conifer Aphids

Giant Conifer Aphids

Dear Peggy,
We just posted a lengthy description of Giant Conifer Aphids, which we believe you have based on the details we are able to make out in your blurry photo.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Christmas tree bug
Location: London uk
January 2, 2014 11:00 am
Hi Bugman
My mother in law took this photo of some bugs that hatched from a Nordman Fir Xmas tree. Lots of em, quite small – see the fir tree leaf for scale. Any ideas and should she be worried ( she let them go in the garden).
Thanks
Signature: Adrian Hoole

Giant Conifer Aphids

Giant Conifer Aphids

Hi Adrian,
According to BugGuide:  “If it’s big, and on a conifer, it’s probably
Cinara. To identify further, it’s usually necessary to identify the host plant, and consider the geographic range of different species.”  Cinara is a genus with members commonly called the Giant Conifer Aphids.  It is a rare year that doesn’t arrive with someone wondering about the Giant Conifer Aphids that have been living on the tree since before Christmas and not discovered until it is time to take the dry tree out.  If there are any conifers living in the area and the weather isn’t freezing, we would not discount the possibility of Giant Conifer Aphids being spread to distant locations thanks to Christmas trees.  BugGuide also notes:  “Tends to form colonies on individual trees. They secrete honeydew, which is eaten by ants and wasps and provides the substrate for sooty mold fungus. May cause some stunting or even death on small or already-stressed hosts, but generally not a serious threat.
They are, however, a problem for Christmas tree growers: customers don’t like large, conspicuous aphids in their homes, especially since they tend to abandon the tree as it starts to dry out.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pyramid Head
Location: Central Coast, Australia
December 30, 2013 5:25 am
Hey, I found this bug on the side of my house and (obviously) have no idea what its is
I dubbed it pyramid head, named after the monster from silent hill.
thank you in advance.
Signature: Amber

Leafhopper

Leafhopper

Dear Amber,
While we have not been able to quickly find a conclusive species match for your Free Living Hemipteran, we are relatively confident that it is a Leafhopper in the family Cicadellidae, and probably a Flatheaded Leafhopper in the subfamily Ledrinae.  The Brisbane Insect website has a few photos of immature specimens that bear a resemblance to your insect.  PaDIL, the Pests and Diseases Image Library has a page on the Glassy Winged Sharpshooter and other native insects is can be confused with, and though many of those look similar, none seems to be an exact match either.  We continued to search and then we discovered the World’s Largest Leafhopper,
Ledromorpha planirostris, back on the Brisbane Insect website, and we are relatively confident that is your species.  We don’t understand how we missed it the first pass we made on the Brisbane Insect website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bugs
Location: Dullstroom, Mpumalanga, South Africa
December 23, 2013 11:48 pm
Trying to find out what this bug is. Found in grasslands against rocks.
Thanks
Signature: Charl

Possibly Scale Insects

Soft Scale Insects, NOT Planthopper Nymphs

Dear Charl,
If you had only sent one photo, we might have doubted that these were insects because they almost look like fungus.  Providing the view from beneath reveals the tiny legs.  Our first guess is that these must be Planthoppers or some other immature stage in the development of a Hemipteran, an order with many member that secrete a waxy sustance for protection.  We also would not rule out that this might be a larval Sawfly, another group with members known to secrete a waxy protection like this individual from BugGuide.  We have an image from Madagascar that was never properly identified that looks similar, but not exactly like your image.  We suspected those creatures to be Planthopper Nymphs.  There are similar images on the Lonely Traveler Blog that are identified as being Flattid Planthopper Nymps.  An even closer match is the adult female Coconut Mealybug, 
Nipaecoccus nipae, that is pictured on Featured Creatures.  There is also a similar photo of a Coconut Mealybug on the University of Florida IFAS Extension site which indicates it is found in Africa.  While we are not certain of a species identification, we are confident that this is some insect in the order Hemiptera.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide something more definite.

Possibly Unknown Hemipteran

Soft Scale Insect

Hi Daniel,
Thanks so very much for your efforts. Will study further and should I discover anything will let you know.
A merry Christmas to you.
Kind regards,
Charl Strydom.

Update:  December 28, 2013
We just received a comment indicating that this is a Soft Scale Insect in the family Coccidae.

Update:  January 4, 2014
Subject: Insects
Location: Dullstroom, Mpumalanga, South Africa
January 4, 2014 7:41 am
Update to “Mystery Insects from South Africa are Soft Scales” posted 23rd Dec 2013.
Found more and adding photo’s.
Signature: Charl

Soft Scale

Soft Scale

Thanks for sending additional images Charl.

Soft Scale

Soft Scale

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination