Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
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Subject: Unique bug
Location: City park of Iron Mountain Michigan
October 23, 2015 9:19 pm
I was at the park with my son, a tiny little bug landed on me. I have never seen this type before, I tried to find out what it is but am having no luck. I am hoping this site will help me find my answer. It’s getting to the end of fall.
Signature: Amanda

Woolly Aphid

Woolly Aphid

Dear Amanda,
Your insect is a Woolly Aphid in the subfamily Eriosomatinae, and you can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Nearly all members of this subfamily alternate between host plants, generally with a woody primary host (on which overwintering eggs are laid, and on which some species induce galls) and an herbaceous secondary host.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow mites? Bugs? What are they?
Location: Northern IL – October
October 18, 2015 7:03 pm
Greetings!
While doing some fall cleanup today, I came across these interesting critters. We have a swamp milkweed plant in the yard (which has done a fine job attracting the butterflies – many monarchs this summer – yay!). I was cutting back the stalks of the milkweed and at the base of one of those stalks, I found this interesting collection of… something. At first I thought it was a fungus or mold, but then realized they had legs and were moving! They are a beautiful color – just wondering what they are? We are in northern Illinois.
Thanks for any help you can provide!
Signature: JP

Milkweed Aphids

Milkweed Aphids

Dear JP,
You have Milkweed Aphids,
Aphis nerii, and according to BugGuide it is:  “native to the Mediterranean, now cosmopolitan. Introduced along with its host plant, oleander. It has spread beyond the geographic distribution of this plant to the entire US and Canada.”  Aphids are not considered beneficial insects as they suck the juices from plants while feeding.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: It’s watching me!
Location: San Diego, CA
October 3, 2015 10:57 am
We have these flying insects eating our plants in the garden. They are very fast and observant of you trying to get near it.
Signature: Dashboardkat

Sharpshooter

Sharpshooter

Dear Dashboardkat,
We believe your Leafhopper is a Sharpshooter in the tribe Proconiini based on images posted to BugGuide.  Sharpshooters have excellent eyesight and they easily avoid humans by quickly moving to the other side of a twig or branch where they are feeding.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I think it’s a bettle???
Location: South Korea
September 20, 2015 4:55 pm
I’m stationed in South Korea and I found these 2 bugs on a tree this morning. What are they?
Signature: Christian

White Cicadas

White Cicadas

Dear Christian,
Though they are commonly called White Cicadas, your insects are actually Fulgorid Leafhoppers,
Lycorma delicatula, and we frequently get identification requests for the bright red nymphs with bold black and white markings.  Also known as the Spotted Lanternfly, this species was recently reported in Pest News as an invasive exotic species detected in Pennsylvania.  According to Pest News:  “Spotted lanternfly feeds on a variety of host plants including fruit trees, ornamental trees, woody trees, and vines.  Apples, birch, cherry, dogwood, grapes, Korean Evodia, lilac, maple, poplar, stone fruits, and tree-of-heaven are among more than 70 species of hosts attacked by this pest.  Tree-of-heaven, which contains high concentrations of cytotoxic alkaloids, is one of the favorite hosts.  This is probably why spotted lanternfly is considered poisonous and used in traditional Chinese medicine.  Other preferred hosts such as Korean Evodia (Bebe tree) are also used in oriental medicine suggesting that spotted lanternfly has a high preference for hosts that contain toxic secondary metabolites.  Observations in South Korea also indicate that spotted lanternfly appears to have a wider host range early in life as young nymphs and a narrow range as they grow older, especially before egg laying.  Choosing plants with toxic metabolites for egg laying is thought to be a mechanism of defense to protect from natural enemies.  Although grape vine does not have toxic metabolites like these other hosts, spotted lanternfly showed a strong preference in studies conducted in South Korea.  Sugar content of the host plant also appears to play a role in their choice with a preference for hosts containing high sucrose and fructose content.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Small grasshopper like bug
Location: Hobart indiana
September 20, 2015 4:47 pm
These little guys like hanging out on my hibiscus leaves. I find them strange because they seem to shoot little droplets from there rear ends.
Signature: Mike

Candystriped Leafhoppers

Candystriped Leafhoppers

Dear Mike,
These Candystriped Leafhoppers,
Graphocephala coccinea, are not even closely related to Grasshoppers.  Leafhoppers are more closely related to Cicadas, and they are classified along with Aphids and True Bugs in the order Hemiptera, insects with mouths adapted to piercing and sucking fluids.  Like Aphids, they release honeydew, which is the widely used name for the droplets you observed.  Like many members of their order, Candystriped Leafhoppers are considered pest species in the garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Looks like a cicada nymph, but it’s wingless and has pointed rear.
Location: Sarnia, Ontario. Canada
August 13, 2015 9:59 am
This bug weirded me out. It was on inside of van window, then I pulled over to inspect it. It looked like a crescent moon with legs and danced side to side. I managed to get this picture before it jumped on my shirt and my hubby knocked it off. Because I screamed so loud, I didn’t want to get on ground to look for it again. I didn’t want people thinking the wrong thing, so I drove away.
Signature: Tolerant of bugs I know of, terrified of unknown.

Leafhopper Nymph:  Coelidia olitoria

Leafhopper Nymph: Coelidia olitoria

Dear Tolerant,
We quickly identified your Leafhopper Nymph as
Coelidia olitoria on BugGuide, and this BugGuide posting mentions the side to side dance you witnessed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination