Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant mimic true bug
Location: Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica
February 28, 2014 7:16 am
My husband and I found this early instar bug while in Corcovado NP, Costa Rica in February 2014. It was definitely mimicking an ant. It was one of the neatest insects we saw during our trip. Thank you!
Signature: Laura

Ant Mimic

Ant Mimic might be Peanut Headed Bug

Hi Laura,
This is such a strange looking creature.  We wonder if it might be an immature Peanut Headed Bug.  We have a photo of hatchling Peanut Headed Bugs on our site, but no early instar nymphs.

Thank you! It does look like an early instar peanut-headed bug! Interesting that the early instars are ant mimics. We thought it was an ant at first until we took a closer look.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: garden bug
Location: Sacramento CA, USA
February 16, 2014 6:20 pm
I found these strangers on my neighbor’s miniature roses. It is February now, and the location is Sacramento, CA, USA. They were on other plants, but seem to prefer roses. they are about the size of a large, fat grain of cooked rice. Picture P2140190 is on the miniature rose from above, and picture P2140192 is the underside of one of them. The white area is fibrous and kind of fluffy.
Signature: Lily Tee

Cottony Cushion Scale

Cottony Cushion Scale

Dear Lily Tee,
This looks like a Cottony Cushion Scale,
Icerya purchasi, to us.  According to BugGuide, it is also called “Fluted Scale, Australian Bug, Australian Mealybug.”  This introduced species poses a major threat to citrus trees as well as many other cultivated plants.  BugGuide also notes:  “The white fluted part of the insect is an egg sac that can contain up to 1000 eggs. The insect is hermaphroditic, producing sperm that can fertilize its own ova, but in an alternate reproductive strategy it can also make winged males that can fertilize the female part of other individuals.  When it first appeared in the w. US it was a major pest of Citrus crops. In CA, around 1889, it was an early success story for biological control by beneficial ladybird beetles (Rodolia cardinalis). (Full story) The control was so successful that in 1893 a Florida nurseryman asked for some of the beneficials to be sent to FL, to test as a control for other scale insects. The scale was included in the shipment as food for the beetles, and thus accidentally introduced to FL citrus.”  Your images are quite excellent in detail.

Cottony Cushion Scale

Cottony Cushion Scale

Thank you so much for your quick response! I will get my friend some lady bugs (and some for me as well).
Lily

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hi Daniel – Bug Rescued from Birdbath
Location: Hawthorne, CA
February 13, 2014 8:08 pm
Hi Daniel,
I rescued this bug from the birdbath today and can’t for the life of me figure out what it is. It was still very wet in these photos, but I’m hoping you can help identify it. When I went back after a time to see if it had dried off, it and the stick it was on were gone.
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter

Hi Anna,
We are not going to award you the Bug Humanitarian Award for this Glassy Winged Sharpshooter, but we just might create a new tag of notoriety.  According to BugGuide, the invasive, exotic Glassy Winged Sharpshooter is:  “A major vector of Pierce’s disease on grape. Usually not a serious pest within its native range, this sp. was introduced into so. California, where it has become a serious threat to viticulture.”

Oh, my.  I wonder if I need to contact someone about this.

We wouldn’t trouble the authorities on this matter.  The Glassy Winged Sharpshooter is already established in Southern California.  Though we don’t endorse extermination, you might consider squashing any individuals you encounter in the future.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID
Location: Singapore
February 5, 2014 11:12 pm
Dear Sir,
I would appreciate it if you could assist to identify this insect. It was shot in the western area of Singapore. Thank you very much in advance.
Regards,
Signature: Anthony

Planthopper

Planthopper

Dear Anthony,
This is a free living Hemipteran, probably a Planthopper, but we were unable to identify it quickly.  We are posting your image and we will return to attempting an identification at a later time.  Your image is strikingly graphic.

Re: Planthopper from Singapore – February 12, 2014
Hi Daniel and Anthony:
This is a Lophopid Planthopper (Family Lophopidae), probably in the genus Elasmoscelis. The species most commonly featured on the internet are E. perforata and E. platypoda (Siam Insect-Zoo & Museum – fourth row of images from the bottom), both of which look very similar. Other sites with similar images include this one on flickr and this one on Clubsnap, both of which appear to have used the Siam Insect-Zoo site to identify them as E. platypoda.  Regards.  Karl

Thanks Karl,
We were thinking of you after we posted this Planthopper and were unable to identify it.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you very much for helping to identify this bug.  Appreicated!
Have a pleasant weekend!
Cheers!
anthony

February 26, 2014
Dear Daniel,
Thank you very much for identifying the bug.  You guys are really good.
Cheers!
anthony

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  ID PLease
Location:  Dibrugarh, Assam, India
February 3, 2014
Sir,
I have found these two unknown insects in Dibrugarh, Assam, India but
don’t know the name.
So would like to know the name.
Regards,
Jeet Saikia,
Bangalore. India.

What's That Bug???

What’s That Bug???

Hi again Jeet,
We are uncertain of the identity of your green insect.  We believe it is in the same order as the Planthopper, which is Hemiptera, but we are not certain.  It shares many similarities with this immature Glassy Winged Sharpshooter on BugGuide.  We haven’t the time for research, so we are posting your request, and perhaps one of our readers will have an idea.

Hi Daniel,
Reference to your second mail, the green insect is small in size. Say
like 1cm (max) and body is flatten.
Hope this will help you to identify this creature.
Regards,
Jeet Saikia,
Bangalore. India.

Subject: green insect posted by Jeet Saitura
February 10, 2014 11:54 am
larva (nymph) of Cicadellidae,  identical with or (more probably) related to genus Ledropsis:
http://aoki2.si.gunma-u.ac.jp/youtyuu/HTMLs/komimizuku.html
Signature: Erwin M. Beyer

Thanks Erwin,
Nymphs are notoriously difficult to identify to the species level, but the link you provided looks very similar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  ID PLease
Location:  Dibrugarh, Assam, India
February 3, 2014
Sir,
I have found these two unknown insects in Dibrugarh, Assam, India but
don’t know the name.
So would like to know the name.
Regards,
Jeet Saikia,
Bangalore. India.

Leafhopper Nymph

Leafhopper Nymph

Dear Jeet,
We are splitting your request into two separate postings.  The creature with the white filaments is an immature Planthopper Nymph, possibly in the family Fulgoridae.  The filaments are actually a waxy substance produced by the Planthopper nymph as protection.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination