Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
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Subject: White bugs on heavenly bamboo
Location: Sacramento
March 25, 2014 12:14 pm
These creatures are all over my heavenly bamboo, particularly on the top third of the branches. They hang out on the underside–they appear to be hanging on by legs and a mouth, but my mom thinks they are a chrysalis. The front of them is a brown or maybe an orange/black. We picked a few off thinking they were a pest before thinking maybe they’re good bugs–what are they? It’s an unseasonably warm/dry spring in Sacramento, CA.
Signature: Danielle

Cottony Cushion Scale

Cottony Cushion Scale

Dear Danielle,
You have an infestation of Cottony Cushion Scale, a pest species from Australia that has become established in North America where it is a significant crop pest.  According to BugGuide:  “The white fluted part of the insect is an egg sac that can contain up to 1000 eggs. The insect is hermaphroditic, producing sperm that can fertilize its own ova, but in an alternate reproductive strategy it can also make winged males that can fertilize the female part of other individuals.
When it first appeared in the w. US it was a major pest of Citrus crops. In CA, around 1889, it was an early success story for biological control by beneficial ladybird beetles (Rodolia cardinalis). (Full story) The control was so successful that in 1893 a Florida nurseryman asked for some of the beneficials to be sent to FL, to test as a control for other scale insects. The scale was included in the shipment as food for the beetles, and thus accidentally introduced to FL citrus.

Cottony Cushion Scale

Cottony Cushion Scale

Thank you so much! 1000 eggs! Really? Eeek–I’m not a “bug man”–my skin is crawling. I appreciate the info.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug in Laos
Location: Vientiane Laos
March 24, 2014 9:21 pm
Hi…I just want to know what this bug is and can I safely pick it up?
Signature: Mike Andreas

Lanternfly

Lanternfly

Dear Mike,
This Lanternfly,
Pyrops candelaria, is perfectly harmless and it may be handled without fear.

Thanks so much! I’d never seen anything like this here before. A friend who spent their life here in Laos never has either. Very lucky!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What the heck is this thing?!
Location: Suriname, South America (Amazon)
March 21, 2014 6:15 am
Hi,
My name is Josh Lassiter and my father Terry sent me a picture of a bug that he saw in Suriname, South America. It is CRAZY and I would love to know what it is. Can you all help?
Signature: Whatever is normal

Fulgorid Planthopper:  Lystra species

Fulgorid Planthopper: Lystra species

Hi Josh,
This is a Fulgorid Planthopper in the genus
LystraPinterest identifies is as a Red Dotted Planthopper, Lystra lanata.    According to PBase, it is also called a Waxy Tailed Planthopper.  Birdspiders.com posits another species possibility, Lystra strigata, also called a Red Dotted Planthopper, and we would entertain the possibility that the two species might actually represent different taxonomic opinions about the same species.  The waxy filaments on the posterior end are a secretion, presumably for protection.

Thank you so much for your quick response! I really appreciate it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug identification
Location: Selangor, Malaysia
March 2, 2014 7:56 am
Hi bugman
I’m Sham from Malaysia…do you know what kind of bug this is ? I shoot it this past february on banana tree nearby the lake…is it planthopper species…? thanks.
Signature: Shamsul Hidayat Omar

Hopper

Hopper

Dear Shamsul,
This is a Free Living Hemipteran in the suborder Auchenorrhyncha
, however, beyond that, we are unable at this time to provide a more specific taxonomy.  The suborder Auchenorrhyncha includes Planthoppers, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, Cicadas and many other Free Living Hemipterans.  We feel safe in calling this a Hopper, but that common term does not coincide with any particular family within the suborder.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant mimic true bug
Location: Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica
February 28, 2014 7:16 am
My husband and I found this early instar bug while in Corcovado NP, Costa Rica in February 2014. It was definitely mimicking an ant. It was one of the neatest insects we saw during our trip. Thank you!
Signature: Laura

Ant Mimic

Ant Mimic might be Peanut Headed Bug

Hi Laura,
This is such a strange looking creature.  We wonder if it might be an immature Peanut Headed Bug.  We have a photo of hatchling Peanut Headed Bugs on our site, but no early instar nymphs.

Thank you! It does look like an early instar peanut-headed bug! Interesting that the early instars are ant mimics. We thought it was an ant at first until we took a closer look.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: garden bug
Location: Sacramento CA, USA
February 16, 2014 6:20 pm
I found these strangers on my neighbor’s miniature roses. It is February now, and the location is Sacramento, CA, USA. They were on other plants, but seem to prefer roses. they are about the size of a large, fat grain of cooked rice. Picture P2140190 is on the miniature rose from above, and picture P2140192 is the underside of one of them. The white area is fibrous and kind of fluffy.
Signature: Lily Tee

Cottony Cushion Scale

Cottony Cushion Scale

Dear Lily Tee,
This looks like a Cottony Cushion Scale,
Icerya purchasi, to us.  According to BugGuide, it is also called “Fluted Scale, Australian Bug, Australian Mealybug.”  This introduced species poses a major threat to citrus trees as well as many other cultivated plants.  BugGuide also notes:  “The white fluted part of the insect is an egg sac that can contain up to 1000 eggs. The insect is hermaphroditic, producing sperm that can fertilize its own ova, but in an alternate reproductive strategy it can also make winged males that can fertilize the female part of other individuals.  When it first appeared in the w. US it was a major pest of Citrus crops. In CA, around 1889, it was an early success story for biological control by beneficial ladybird beetles (Rodolia cardinalis). (Full story) The control was so successful that in 1893 a Florida nurseryman asked for some of the beneficials to be sent to FL, to test as a control for other scale insects. The scale was included in the shipment as food for the beetles, and thus accidentally introduced to FL citrus.”  Your images are quite excellent in detail.

Cottony Cushion Scale

Cottony Cushion Scale

Thank you so much for your quick response! I will get my friend some lady bugs (and some for me as well).
Lily

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination