Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified reed insect
Location: Gifberg, South Africa (S 31.77 E 18.76)
April 1, 2014 2:41 pm
Dear bugman
I found this insect North of the Cederberg, in South Africa. It jumped into the open 4×4 truck window from some tall grasses/reeds we were driving through. It seemed capable of jumping, although its legs seem incapable of this feat. Any idea what it may be? I am from South Africa but never saw something like this before. Length was approx 20mm.
Signature: Francois

What's That Bug???

What’s That Bug???

Dear Francois,
This has to be one of the most unusual creatures we have ever been asked to identify, and we really don’t know where to begin regarding its classification, except that it is a Hexapod.  We haven’t the time to research this at this moment, so we are posting your photos and we will attempt the identification later today.  Perhaps our readership will take a stab at this while we are away from the office.

What's That Bug???

What’s That Bug???

Karl Identifies Leafhopper
Hi Daniel and Francois:
Given the submission date Daniel, it crossed my mind that you were perhaps being pranked with this one. However, it turns out to be a Restio Leafhopper (Family Cicadellidae: Subfamily Ulopinae: Tribe Cephalelini). These leafhoppers are native to South Africa, Australia and New Zealand, and the common name derives from the fact that all South African members of the Cephalelini are associated exclusively with the Restionaceae plant family. South Africa has 23 species of Restio Leafhoppers in four genera, 18 of which belong to the genus Cephalelus (so odds are that this is one). All the photos I was able to find showed winged individuals so I expect that this one is a juvenile. If you want to know how such a short-legged beast was able to jump into your truck you could check out this site (stop-action photos and description of Cephalelus in action). Regards. Karl

Eric Eaton Identifies Fulgorid Planthopper
Daniel:
Some kind of fulgoroid.  Will have to get back to you later with a more specific answer as I’ll have to look it up and/or query a colleague.
Eric

Update:  Restio Leafhopper
Ariella wrote today in a comment that this is a Restio Leafhopper,
Cephalelus uncinatus, a species pictured on ISpot.

Update from Chris Dietrich
It’s a nymph of the leafhopper (Cicadellidae) genus Cephalelus, which belongs to a tribe that is disjunct in South Africa and Australia.  They feed only on Restionaceae.
-Chris

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tiny black insects on flower bud
Location: Stockton, CA
March 26, 2014 1:01 pm
It started raining recently, and I just noticed these small black bugs on a flower bud sprouting from the succulent plant on my balcony. I included a close-up and a shot from farther back for size perspective. They don’t seem to move much, and they appear to be less than 1 mm in length. They’re kinda cool looking. What are they??
Signature: Bug-Curious

Black Aphids

Black Aphids

Dear Bug-Curious,
You have Aphids and they feed by sucking the nutritious fluids from plants, so though they look cool, they are injurious to your plant.  There is a similar photo on Succulents and More.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White bugs on heavenly bamboo
Location: Sacramento
March 25, 2014 12:14 pm
These creatures are all over my heavenly bamboo, particularly on the top third of the branches. They hang out on the underside–they appear to be hanging on by legs and a mouth, but my mom thinks they are a chrysalis. The front of them is a brown or maybe an orange/black. We picked a few off thinking they were a pest before thinking maybe they’re good bugs–what are they? It’s an unseasonably warm/dry spring in Sacramento, CA.
Signature: Danielle

Cottony Cushion Scale

Cottony Cushion Scale

Dear Danielle,
You have an infestation of Cottony Cushion Scale, a pest species from Australia that has become established in North America where it is a significant crop pest.  According to BugGuide:  “The white fluted part of the insect is an egg sac that can contain up to 1000 eggs. The insect is hermaphroditic, producing sperm that can fertilize its own ova, but in an alternate reproductive strategy it can also make winged males that can fertilize the female part of other individuals.
When it first appeared in the w. US it was a major pest of Citrus crops. In CA, around 1889, it was an early success story for biological control by beneficial ladybird beetles (Rodolia cardinalis). (Full story) The control was so successful that in 1893 a Florida nurseryman asked for some of the beneficials to be sent to FL, to test as a control for other scale insects. The scale was included in the shipment as food for the beetles, and thus accidentally introduced to FL citrus.

Cottony Cushion Scale

Cottony Cushion Scale

Thank you so much! 1000 eggs! Really? Eeek–I’m not a “bug man”–my skin is crawling. I appreciate the info.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug in Laos
Location: Vientiane Laos
March 24, 2014 9:21 pm
Hi…I just want to know what this bug is and can I safely pick it up?
Signature: Mike Andreas

Lanternfly

Lanternfly

Dear Mike,
This Lanternfly,
Pyrops candelaria, is perfectly harmless and it may be handled without fear.

Thanks so much! I’d never seen anything like this here before. A friend who spent their life here in Laos never has either. Very lucky!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What the heck is this thing?!
Location: Suriname, South America (Amazon)
March 21, 2014 6:15 am
Hi,
My name is Josh Lassiter and my father Terry sent me a picture of a bug that he saw in Suriname, South America. It is CRAZY and I would love to know what it is. Can you all help?
Signature: Whatever is normal

Fulgorid Planthopper:  Lystra species

Fulgorid Planthopper: Lystra species

Hi Josh,
This is a Fulgorid Planthopper in the genus
LystraPinterest identifies is as a Red Dotted Planthopper, Lystra lanata.    According to PBase, it is also called a Waxy Tailed Planthopper.  Birdspiders.com posits another species possibility, Lystra strigata, also called a Red Dotted Planthopper, and we would entertain the possibility that the two species might actually represent different taxonomic opinions about the same species.  The waxy filaments on the posterior end are a secretion, presumably for protection.

Thank you so much for your quick response! I really appreciate it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug identification
Location: Selangor, Malaysia
March 2, 2014 7:56 am
Hi bugman
I’m Sham from Malaysia…do you know what kind of bug this is ? I shoot it this past february on banana tree nearby the lake…is it planthopper species…? thanks.
Signature: Shamsul Hidayat Omar

Hopper

Hopper

Dear Shamsul,
This is a Free Living Hemipteran in the suborder Auchenorrhyncha
, however, beyond that, we are unable at this time to provide a more specific taxonomy.  The suborder Auchenorrhyncha includes Planthoppers, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, Cicadas and many other Free Living Hemipterans.  We feel safe in calling this a Hopper, but that common term does not coincide with any particular family within the suborder.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination