Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
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Don’t have a clue where to start with this one
January 31, 2010
Hi,
I haven’t got a clue what this is. I took the shot in Tortuguero National Park in Costa Rica.
Thanks
Miles
Costa Rica, Caribeean coast

Planthopper

Hi again Miles,
This is a Freeliving Hemipteran in the suborder Auchenorrhyncha, and probably in the superfamily Fulgoroidea.  It may be one of the Issid Planthoppers in the family Issidae or perhaps a Cixiid Planthopper in the family Cixiidae.  Though they are not your of species, we have linked to some photos on BugGuide that look similar enough to have made the general identification we provided.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide a species identification.

Karl finds some information
Hi Daniel and Miles:
This looks like a Net-winged Hopper in the family Nogodinidae, a relatively small group of planthoppers that are quite similar to the Issidae, of which they are sometimes considered to be a subfamily. It is difficult to find much information about the group, but there are several photos identified as Biolleyana costalis and Biolleyana sp. posted on Flickr that look more or less identical. The Electronic Biologia Centrali-Americana provides very similar illustrations under the older synonym, Sassula costalis. Regards.
Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Belizian Bug
January 25, 2010
I found this bug January 10th 2009, on edge of clearing in the Chiqual Rainforest. There where several ranging in length from 1 to 2cm in length.
Also I am sorry If i already sent you this before but I am not sure if my last message got sent.
Becky
Belize

Immature Treehopper

Hi Becky,
This is an immature Free Living Hemipteran, probably a Treehopper in the family Membracidae.  We will try to find a species match for you.  Here is a link to a photo of a North American species posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Costa Rican Hopper? Crazy looking ‘nose.’
January 22, 2010
Walking through the primary forest in NE Costa Rica near Rio La Suerte, I stumbled across this beauty on on the bole of a tree. Being in the tropics I unfortunately couldn’t identify the tree, but it had a very smooth bole and according to a local these bugs frequent this particular tree. I’m guessing it’s some sort of hopper/spittlebug or something of the sort, the nose is so unusual, I’ve never seen anything like it.
Mike Cleveland
North Eastern Costa Rica

Fulgorid Planthopper

Hi Mike,
This is a Fulgorid Planthopper in the family Fulgoridae.  In attempting to locate information on Costa Rican species, we stumbled upon a technical paper coauthored by Piotr Naskrecki who often assists us in the identification of Katydids.  We will contact him to see if he recognizes your species.

Instant Gratification thanks to Piotr Naskrecki
Hi Daniel,
I know this species very well. It is Phrictus quinquepartitus, a beautiful
species found in the lowland forests of Central America, often on Peruvian
almond (Terminalia oblonga).
Cheers,
Piotr

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Please identify this bug
January 17, 2010
I could not find out what kind of bug is this, I have been looking on the internet with no result.
THank you
No thanks
West Java, Indonesia

Unknown Hopper

This is some species of Free Living Hemipteran, probably a Fulgorid Planthopper, or possibly a Lanternfly in the superfamily Fulgoroidea.  Hopefully, one of our readers will be able to provide a more specific identification.  Often immature specimens can be difficult to identify.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Found this bug in my florida house
January 9, 2010
Found this is the house. What bug is this? Black with Red/organge striped wings.
thanks for help
New port richey fl

Two Lined Spittlebug

Two Lined Spittlebug

This is a Two Lined Spittlebug, Prosapia bicincta, a common garden insect that feeds on grasses and holly.  It will not damage your home and is not dangerous to humans or pets.  It probably accidentally came indoors from the yard.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

6-legged “spider”
January 8, 2010
Dear Bugman,
We noticed several of these spider-like bugs crawling around inside our house this December. They seemed to coincide with the set-up of our freshly cut Christmas tree. Once the tree was removed in January we did not notice them anymore. This just may be a coincidence, but we don’t know for sure. We thought they were spiders, but noticed they have only 6 legs. Thanks in advance for your time and we look forward to your response, whether or not you can identify them.
Ed V.
Long Island, NY

Giant Conifer Aphid

Giant Conifer Aphid

Hi Ed,
We did a web search of “Aphid and Pine” and found a North Carolina State University page on Cinara Aphids on Christmas Trees with text, but no images.  The site states:  “Cinara Aphid Appearance. Cinara aphids are some of the largest aphids found in the world, Cinara aphids are usually dark in color appearing brown to black. The young are smaller versions of the adult. Cinarastrobi, the Cinara aphid found on eastern white pine, has white spots on the rear of the abdomen. Cinara aphids eggs are black and oblong and are found singly on the base of the needles.
”  We then verified the appearance on BugGuide, and we are satisfied with the identification that you had Giant Conifer Aphids in the genus Cinara.  We often get reports of unusual insects crawling off of Christmas trees.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for your quick reply and apparently accurate identification. The photos on BugGuide look very similar to the actual bugs and to my photo, and after reading the NCSU page I’m convinced that’s what they were. I had checked BugGuide but would have never guessed they are aphids, so skipped that section.
Thanks again,
Ed

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination