Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
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what flying insect is it?
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
March 8, 2011 12:47 am
I don’t know what is it, it is a little bigger than mosquito. can you tell me what is it?
Signature: daisugi, Indonesia

Derbid Planthopper

Dear daisugi,
This is a Derbid Planthopper in the family Derbidae.  BugGuide, a website dedicated to the identification of North American insects, credits Andy Hamilton with this statement:  “Nymphs of Derbidae feed on fungi. Adults just seem to hang around on vegetation waiting on others passing by.”  Previous submissions to our website of this obscure family have been from Singapore, Australia and Ohio in the USA.

Derbid Planthopper

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Lantern Bug from Borneo
Location: Poring Hot Springs, Sabah, Borneo
February 9, 2011 3:35 am
I believe this Lantern Bug seen in Sabah, Borneo, is a Fulgora sp., but can anyone tell me which species?
Signature: Peter Bruce-Jones

Lanternfly

Hi Peter,
We did a search for Lanternfly and Borneo and found a beautiful, rather similar looking insect on the Lost Borneo website that is identified as the genus
Pyrops.  An image web search of that name brought us to a photo on Flickriver that is identified as Pyrops whiteheadi.  We cannot say for certain that that is correct because we do not have a background in entomology, and we know that there is a proliferation of misinformation on the internet.  We are constantly misidentifying some of the photos that we post.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you. I agree wholeheartedly with your point about misinformation on the internet, but I have managed to find some other images of Pyrops whiteheadi which match the one in the link you sent and my image, so I think it is most likely correct. The search has also yielded the the unexpected ID for a mantis I photographed in Borneo too, so doubly thanks!
Best regards,
Peter

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Lantern bug from Peru
Location: Shima, near Satipo, Junin, Peru
February 5, 2011 2:47 pm
Can you please help me to identify this lantern bug found in central Peru?
Signature: Peter Bruce-Jones

Lantern Bug

Hi Peter,
The Planthopper Superfamily Fulgoroidea includes the Lanternflies, but we are not certain if your individual is in that family.  The Free-Living Hemipterans are a real taxonomic challenge.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to supply a species identification for you.

Lantern Bug

Identification Courtesy of Karl
Hi Daniel and Peter:
It’s a classic case of misdirection. The relatively large false eye at the rear end and the tapered head give the impression that the bug is facing in the opposite direction. With luck, a would-be predator will attack the wrong end allowing the bug to escape in the opposite direction.  The aptly named False-eye Lantern Bug (Fulgoridae: Odontoptera carrenoi) ranges from Central America to Amazonia, Regards. Karl

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Treehopper from Peru
Location: Shima, near Satipo, Junin, Peru
February 5, 2011 2:43 pm
Can anyone please identify this treehopper found in central Peru?
Signature: Peter Bruce-Jones

Treehopper

Hi Peter,
This is one beautiful Treehopper in the family Membracidae.  We have a vague memory of having received an image of this species, or a very similar species, in the past.  We will attempt to search our archive to provide a species identification.  Just a note that if you provide a comment on this posting, you will be notified in the future if anyone comments or provides an identification.  We did locate a matching photo on Corbis Images, but the species is not identified.

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Unknown bugs
Location: Rio Pindayo, near Curimana, Ucayali, Peru
February 5, 2011 2:51 am
Can anyone please help to identify these bugs seen in Peru?
Signature: Peter Bruce-Jones

Treehoppers

Hi Peter,
We believe that these are Treehoppers in the family Membracidae, though we would not rule out that they are Free Living Hemipterans in another family.  We will work more on a species identification for you.  It appears as though the individual in the upper left corner is giving live birth to a nymph.  Many Hemipterans, including Aphids, are able to reproduce asexually, with females producing genetic clones of themselves without the need for a male of the species.

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Tiny green striped bug with puffed out tail
Location: Suburbs, Pretoria, South Africa
January 30, 2011 3:08 am
We’ve seen quite a lot of these in our back yard in Pretoria, South Africa. They are tiny, and their tails can puff out. They can jump quite far. They tend to be on their own (not in groups). Difficult to describe them, as you’ll see by the photos!
Signature: Sophia

Planthopper Nymph

Hi Sophia,
This is a Planthopper Nymph in the superfamily Fulgoroidea.  You can see many examples of North American Planthopper Nymphs by browsing through the images on BugGuide.  We were not able to find a close match on the Brisbane Insect Website, however, one unidentified Planthopper Nymph looks somewhat similar.

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