Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
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possibly a snout butterfly?
March 1, 2010
my husband found this bug on the back window of his parked truck yesterday, and saved it in a little container for me to see. we’ve lived in Thailand over 25 yrs, so we’ve seen alot of unusual bugs, but never one like this. It has gorgeous green and yellow markings, bright yellow underwings, and a long curved snout. It looked very much like a butterfly when it flew away.
Judi Utley
Chiangmai, Thailand

Lanternfly

Hi Judi,
Though it has some characteristics of a butterfly, this Lanternfly is a Planthopper in the family Fulgoridae.  Tropical species were believed to be luminescent, hence the common name Lanternfly.  This species is Pyrops candelarius, and we located a photo of a mounted specimen on a museum website, and there is a brief description and photo of a living specimen on Wikipedia.

Lanternfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Orange (Black-winged) Leaf Sucking Insect?
February 19, 2010
Hi Bugman,
I found this interesting insect under a leaf and it doesn’t seem to be bothered by me getting close and taking pictures of it. It has long black wings that form a V shape (perpendicular to the body).

Derbid Planthopper

It seemed that it was busy sucking on a leaf… with it’s mouth (or snout) stuck in the vein of the leaf.
I tried searching the whatsthatbug or the net, and I don’t know if I hit the correct key words to get any good search results.. :-(
Thanks a lot for your help!
zybertooth
Singapore

Derbid Planthopper

Dear zybertooth,
At first we thought this was some species of Fly in the order Diptera, but now we believe it is a Planthopper in the superfamily Fulgoroidea.  It resembles one North American species pictured on BugGuide.  We have not had any luck matching your amazing photos to anything posted online, but we will enlist the assistance of our readership on this identification.  We will also contact Eric Eaton to see if he concurs that it is a Planthopper, or if he can confirm our original suspicion that it might be a Fly.

Derbid Planthopper

Eric Eaton Agrees
Planthopper, definitely.  Lois O’Brien would know, of course.  Maybe Derbidae?
Cool image!
Eric

Hi Bugman,
I just found out from a friend who’s a nature enthusiast that this is a Derbid Bug.
FYI,
zybertooth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Jumping insect, Sydney, Australia
February 11, 2010
G’day, I live in Sydney Australia and my workplace is surrounded by bush, and every lunch time our lunch tables outside have these little brown bugs that jump when the long spikes/hairs/not sure what they are, are touched. They are well camouflaged, about 10mm long and fast (when they jump). Do you have any idea of what they are? Cheers, Angela
Angela, Bug enthusiast
Marsfield, Sydney, Australia

Wattle Hopper Nymph

Dear Angela,
Your photos are of an immature Gum Hopper or Wattle Hopper in the family Eurybrachyidae.  The Brisbane Insect Website has numerous species depicted, and all have similar nymphs or immature stages.

Wattle Hopper Nymph

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

An Australian Grub?
February 5, 2010
Hello Bugman, it’s funny, just as you identified my Palm Planthopper, I came across another mystery on my walk. It’s about half an inch in length, and looks a bit like a cross between a pillbug anf a colourful grub.
PS. I contacted Dr Fletcher from Orange Agricultural Institute about the Planthopper, and as a consequence he added my photo of it to their website:
“Lovely pictures of Magia subocellata (Family Lophopidae). This species (and one other species of Magia) is native to North Queensland. It was found a couple of years ago in the tropical palm collection at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney and may well have spread to your area from there.”
http://www1.dpi.nsw.gov.au/keys/fulgor/species/magiasub.html
Ridou Ridou
Sydney, Australia

Giant Scale Insect

Hi again Ridou Ridou,
We didn’t do quite as well with this submission.  We are nearly certain this is a Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae, which in the U.S. are known as Slug Caterpillars.  Many of them have stinging spines.  The Brisbane Insect website, which has a few species posted, though none resemble your example, indicates they are called Cup Moths because of the shape of their cocoons, and the caterpillars that sting are known as Spitfires, our new favorite insect name.  Your individual is most probably not one of the stinging species.

Giant Scale Insect

Eric Eaton Disagrees
Daniel:
I’m thinking the “cup moth caterpillar” from Australia is actually some kind of giant scale insect, but I have no idea which one.  I could also be totally wrong, but I think it is worth checking into.
Eric

Thanks Eric,
WE will research this tomorrow.

Giant Scale Insect

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

An Australian Cicada?
February 3, 2010
Hello Bugman,
I’ve just published a blog post on a cicada (?) I found in our garden. I don’t seem to be able to identify it, so I’m in need of help, please.
The post is at theridoureport.blogspot.com
There’re quite a few posts on bugs and critters I’ve found in our garden and inside – you can find all of them, if you click on the label ‘bugs’. Thanks in advance.
Ridou Ridou
Sydney, Australia

Palm Planthopper

Dear Ridou Ridou,
This appears to be a Palm Planthopper, Magia subocellata, one of the Lophopid Planthoppers in the family Lophopidae.  The Planthoppers are related to the Cicadas, hence your confusion.  We identified your Palm Planthopper on the Brisbane Insect PageFlickr has a nice image that shows the colors well, but the dead mounted specimens on the New South Wales Government website have lost their lovely blue and green coloration.

Palm Planthopper

Well done, I’m impressed!  Ridou Ridou

P.S.  We would love some of those lovely profile shots from your blog to post on our site.

Palm Planthopper

Hi Daniel, here are the photos…  Ridou Ridou

Palm Planthopper

PS. I contacted Dr Fletcher from Orange Agricultural Institute about the Planthopper, and as a consequence he added my photo of it to their website:
“Lovely pictures of Magia subocellata (Family Lophopidae). This species (and one other species of Magia) is native to North Queensland. It was found a couple of years ago in the tropical palm collection at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney and may well have spread to your area from there.”
http://www1.dpi.nsw.gov.au/keys/fulgor/species/magiasub.html
Ridou Ridou
Sydney, Australia

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Don’t have a clue where to start with this one
January 31, 2010
Hi,
I haven’t got a clue what this is. I took the shot in Tortuguero National Park in Costa Rica.
Thanks
Miles
Costa Rica, Caribeean coast

Planthopper

Hi again Miles,
This is a Freeliving Hemipteran in the suborder Auchenorrhyncha, and probably in the superfamily Fulgoroidea.  It may be one of the Issid Planthoppers in the family Issidae or perhaps a Cixiid Planthopper in the family Cixiidae.  Though they are not your of species, we have linked to some photos on BugGuide that look similar enough to have made the general identification we provided.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide a species identification.

Karl finds some information
Hi Daniel and Miles:
This looks like a Net-winged Hopper in the family Nogodinidae, a relatively small group of planthoppers that are quite similar to the Issidae, of which they are sometimes considered to be a subfamily. It is difficult to find much information about the group, but there are several photos identified as Biolleyana costalis and Biolleyana sp. posted on Flickr that look more or less identical. The Electronic Biologia Centrali-Americana provides very similar illustrations under the older synonym, Sassula costalis. Regards.
Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination