Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
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Not in Insects of LA Book
Location: Thousand Oaks, CA
April 1, 2011 9:48 am
Hi,
I’ve seen a small (~ 3mm long x 1 mm wide) bug on a plant in my garden that I can’t identify. It’s been on a Lion’s Mane plant in the Los Angeles, CA area in March of this year (temps between 50-80 F). No picture seems to match it in Hogue’s ”Insects of the LA Basin”, my favorite local reference. A couple of pictures are attached. Thanks for your help.
Signature: TO-photo

Leafhopper Nymph

Dear TO-photo,
We opened your email yesterday, and we knew we wanted to post your photos, but our own garden was calling to us.  We thought about your letter as we were pulling weeds and taking in the wealth of insects that were enjoying the warm sunny conditions, and we waxed poetically about the awesome author Charles Hogue, whose book you mentioned.  The Insects of the Los Angeles Basin is our standard for attempting to identify unknown creatures we encounter, but like you, we are sometimes forced to search other venues.  Perhaps the world is ready for MORE Insects of the Los Angeles Basin because no volume is ever truly complete.  This is an immature Leafhopper, and Hogue’s book only lists two species on page 124.  Immature insects can often be quite difficult to identify to the species level.  We did a quick search of Leafhoppers in the family Cicidellidae on BugGuide, but we were unable to confirm a conclusive match, so we hope you are satisfied with a family identification.  If there are any adult specimens, identification may be much easier.  The quality of your photos is excellent.

Leafhopper Nymph

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is this thing?
Location: Sarasota Florida
March 30, 2011 3:01 pm
I found my Calliandra haematocephala a.k.a. Dwarf Red Powder Puff covered with a ton of these unknown insects this afternoon. Help!!!!
Signature: Peter Sowka

Thorn Treehopper

Hi Peter,
We matched your photo to that of an immature Thorn Treehopper,
Umbonia crassicornis, on BugGuide.  Adults will have fully developed wings.  BugGuide also provides some interesting information, including: “Both young and adults feed on the same trees. Many times both are found together in clusters on branches” and “The female actively tends her brood or colony, which can number from 15 to 50 individuals.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

unidentified blue bug
Location: Southern California
March 27, 2011 6:56 pm
I was curious if you could help me in identifying this bug, if it is one. I’m gonna make a guess as to it being an aphid of some sort or related to them, but I am no entomologist. They are all over the leaves of my hedge. I would really be grateful for the help.
Signature: Curiously Intruiged

Podocarpus Aphids

Hi Curiously Intruiged (Intrigued?),
You are correct.  These are Aphids.  We have similar Aphids on the collard greens in the vegetable patch of our Mt. Washington, Los Angeles garden, though we have not tried to correctly identify the species.

Update:
Buglady just provided a comment that these are Podocarpus Aphids,
Neophyllaphis podocarpi, and BugGuide has a few images of the species.

Thank you so much. (And yes i meant intrigued, damn dyslexia haha.)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Colorful Insect
Location: Chiang Mai, Thailand
March 17, 2011 1:38 am
It’s the second time I see one of those around the house. I’ve been told it usually lives in rice field and it’s just a grasshopper… But I don’t quite believe it.
Signature: Jean-Luc

Lanternfly

Dear Jean-Luc,
We wish we had more time to write about this Lanternfly, but we are already running dangerously late this morning.

ID for yesterday’s lanternfly
March 18, 2011 3:05 pm
The “Lanternfly from Thailand” posted yesterday is probably Fulgora candelaria. Searching Google Images yields a number of extremely similar pictures.
Signature: W. Randy Hoffman

Thanks W. Randy,
Pyrops candelarius brings up matching photos as well.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Tiny White Insect
Location: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
March 14, 2011 4:21 am
Hi, found this relaxing on a succulent plant on a hot day here in Melbourne, Australia… season is Autumn, would you happen to know what this is?
Thank you.
Signature: A.L

Green Planthopper Nymph

Dear A.L.,
We tried browsing through all the postings of Leafhoppers, Treehoppers and Planthoppers in the suborder Auchenorrhyncha that are available on the Brisbane Insect website, but alas, we have not had any luck identifying your immature Hemipteran nymph.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide a more specific identification.

Hi Daniel and A.L.:
I believe this is a Flatid Planthopper (Flatidae: Flatinae) in the predominantly Australian genus Siphanta. It looks very similar to several online images identified as S. acuta, however, there are at least 40 Australian species in the genus and some of them probably have similar looking nymphs. There is also some color variability among nymphs to complicate things further. Nevertheless, S. acuta appears to be the most common species and it has become a bit of a globetrotter as well, with records from New Zealand, Southeast Asia, Africa, Hawaii and mainland USA (California and possibly other states). The common name in Australia and New Zealand is the Green Planthopper, while in the USA it is referred to as the Torpedo Bug. It is considered an agricultural and forest pest in most places where it occurs. The species arrived in Hawaii in the late nineteenth century where it did considerable damage to native trees until it was brought under control in the early twentieth century with the introduction of the Australian egg parasitizing wasp, Aphanomerus puscillus (Scelionidae).   Regards. Karl

Thanks for this one especially Karl.  I really wanted to put a name to this hieroglyphically marked creature.

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what flying insect is it?
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
March 8, 2011 12:47 am
I don’t know what is it, it is a little bigger than mosquito. can you tell me what is it?
Signature: daisugi, Indonesia

Derbid Planthopper

Dear daisugi,
This is a Derbid Planthopper in the family Derbidae.  BugGuide, a website dedicated to the identification of North American insects, credits Andy Hamilton with this statement:  “Nymphs of Derbidae feed on fungi. Adults just seem to hang around on vegetation waiting on others passing by.”  Previous submissions to our website of this obscure family have been from Singapore, Australia and Ohio in the USA.

Derbid Planthopper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination