Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant mealybug ? Scale?
Location: Glendale, California, USA
April 9, 2013 9:30 pm
Greetings Bugman – It is windy indeed around the corner here in Glendale!
Yesterday I removed the ties around a wood stake that was supporting a newly planted albizia tree in my backyard. Bright orange, egg-yolk-looking stuff smeared on my fingers and I found little groupings of these creatures beneath several of the ties.
They look like mealybugs, but they are huge! A quarter of an inch long, at least. Can you identify them? Are they beneficial, destructive, or neutral?
Thanks in advance.
Signature: Janine in Glendale

Cottony Cushion Scale

Cottony Cushion Scale

Hi Janine,
It is currently calm, but we understand the winds are supposed to return today.  We believe these are Cottony Cushion Scale, and we believe that is the insect we found on our endangered California Black Walnut last year.  When we manually smashed them, they were orange.  You can read about the Cottony Cushion Scale on BugGuide where it states:  “Hosts include many plants, though in FL Citrus and Pittosporum are most commonly affected.”
  The University of Florida Featured Creatures states:  “The mature females (actually hemaphrodites) have bright orange-red, yellow, or brown bodies (Ebeling 1959). The body is partially or entirely covered with yellowish or white wax. The most conspicuous feature is the large fluted egg sac, which will frequently be two to 2.5 times longer than the body. The egg sac contains about 1000 red eggs (Gossard 1901).”  You should try to eliminate the Scale.  According to the Featured Creatures:  “The cottony cushion scale can severely damage trees, resets, and nursery stock. Decreased tree vitality, fruit drop, and defoliation result from the feeding of this scale. Most damage occurs from the feeding of the early immature stages of the scale on the leaves, where they settle in rows along the midrib and veins, and on the smaller twigs. The older nymphs continue to feed, but migrate to the larger twigs, and finally, as adults, they settle on the larger branches and trunk. This scale is seldom found on the fruit. Added damage can result from the accumulation of sooty mold due to the honeydew excreted by the scale.”

Thank you so much :). Off on scale safari I go.    Janine

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cicada from Guyana
Location: Guyana , Iwokrama
March 31, 2013 4:31 am
Hi,
I’d be very happy if you could identify this cicada for me. Found it in Guyana at Iwokrama River Lodge.
Thanks!
Signature: Karin

Hemipteran

Froghopper

Hi Karin,
We were out of the office when your identification request arrived and we are currently trying to catch up on all our unanswered mail.  It seems in our absence, we missed Maria Sibylla Merian’s 366th birthday that was noted on Google Doodle and picked up by all the major news outlets including the LA Times, Huffington Post and National GeographicWe did our own lecture on Maria Sibylla Merian at the Getty in 2008.  Since Guyana is next to Suriname, we thought it was appropriate to mention that here.  We don’t believe this is a true Cicada, but rather one of the other closely related Hemipteran families that are classified with Cicadas as free living Hemipterans.  Perhaps we can get a more definite identification at a later date.

Hemipteran

Froghopper

Karl Provides and ID
Hi Daniel and Karin:
Your bug is a Spittle Bug or Froghopper (Auchenorrhyncha: Cercopidae). I am fairly certain that the correct ID would Schistogonia simulans (perhaps = S. cercopoides). I could not find any easily accessible images or information online, but I was able to find it by browsing through an online (downloadable) version of the book “Cercopid Spittle Bugs of the New World (Hemiptera, Auchenorrhyncha, Cercopidae)” by Gervásio Silva Carvalho and Michael D. Webb (2005). Several other South American cercopids look similar; for comparison you could check out Laccogrypota praetor. Regards.  Karl

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hong Kong Bugs
Location: Hong Kong, Tung Chung N. Park
March 28, 2013 3:14 am
I found this and another in a Hong Kong Park this afternoon after a big thunderstorm.
Signature: johnsohk

Lanternfly or Longan Chicken

Lanternfly or Longan Chicken

Dear johnsohk,
Your insect is a Lanternfly in the family Fulgoridae, and we identified the species in the past as
Pyrops candelaria.  Several years ago a reader informed us that the Mandarin name for this insect is translated as the Longan Chicken because it feeds on the sap of Longan Trees.  We will be postdating your submission to go live next week as we will be away from the office for a few days.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: peanut head bug (fulgora laternaria) question
Location: South America
March 20, 2013 1:10 pm
Why does fulgora laternaria have its incredibly distinct head shape?
Signature: James Bowler

Peanut Headed Bug

Peanut Headed Bug

Hi James,
We are not sure even scientists know what evolutionary trajectory caused the Peanut Headed Bug or Lanternfly to develop this unique appearance.  We will see what we can unearth on the internet.  According to Virtual Rainforest:  “Scientists think that the head is supposed to imitate a lizard’s head, and animals that don’t eat lizards are scared away. It is part of a complex anti-predator scheme the bug uses. The peanut-head has large red and black spots on its underwings that look like large eyes when the bug spreads its wings. If these don’t scare away predators, the bug releases a skunk-like spray. In the rainforest there are so many things that want to eat the peanut-head that it needs a lot of defenses.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Three Lacewing larvae attacking Oleander aphids…
Location: Chicago
March 19, 2013 8:05 pm
I took this picture of three lacewing larvae attacking a colony of Oleander aphids right before I blasted them off my milkweed plant with the hose last August here in Chicago.
Signature: Justin

Syrphid Fly Larvae eat Oleander Aphids

Syrphid Fly Larvae eat Oleander Aphids

Hi Justin,
Thanks for sending us an awesome documentary photo, but you have misidentified the predators.  While Lacewing Larvae are known to feed ravenously on Aphids, these are actually Syrphid Fly Larvae.  Adults are often called Hover Flies or Flower Flies.  While we commend your use of a hose to remove the Aphids, a greener alternative than pesticides, we would like to offer our perspective.  By hosing off the Aphids, you also removed the predators.  We would have let nature take its course on this leaf, and we believe the Syrphid Larvae would have eaten all the Aphids in the vicinity.  The Flies would then have matured and produced a new generation of predators and if you have a properly balanced garden with predator species, the need to control Aphids in the future might become an unnecessary action.
  We would have hosed off Aphids from plants that had no predators nearby.

Syrphid Larva eats Oleander Aphid

Syrphid Larva eats Oleander Aphid

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this strange insect?
Location: Chennai,India
February 21, 2013 12:28 pm
Hello Bugman,
Attaching image of insect that I photographed in my garden in the month of September. Can you help identify this insect?
Signature: Seema Swami

Hopper Nymph

Hopper Nymph

Hi Seema,
This is some type of Hopper nymph and it might be very difficult to identify to the species level.  It does resemble some of the members of the family pictured on the Brisbane Insect website.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination