Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
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Subject: Tree Hopper
Location: Ulu Belum, Perak, Malaysia
January 4, 2013 2:19 am
Hi Bugman,
I found a devil like tree hopper.
What is it actually?
Signature: Asyraf

Treehopper

Dear Asyraf,
We somehow missed this submission when you sent it several weeks ago.  Many Treehoppers mimic thorns on plants as camouflage, and the spikes have the added advantage of making them very difficult to swallow.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Snow fly?
Location: Durham, NC USA
January 18, 2013 3:37 pm
I’m an avid insect and macro photography enthusiast and I spotted something this morning on some fresh snow that caught my attention. Looks to be a sp. of snow fly, but I’m not positive. It was a tad smaller that a Drosophila melanogaster (common fruit fly) Any ideas?
Thanks!
Signature: Andrew B.

Aphid in the Snow

Hi Andrew,
This appears to us to be an Aphid, and we presume that snow is not its typical habitat.

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Location:  West Java, Indonesia
January 13, 2013 3:06 pm
Hi Daniel,
Thank you so much Daniel,
I only took 2 pic of the strange looking beetle at that time October 2010 it’s rainy season here in Indonesia, I took it around this coordinate -7.136685,107.391701, the local name of the place is Ranca Upas, Ciwidey, West Java, Indonesia;it’s a camping ground with mountain, tropical forest, and mountain swamp all around. even though the local people use it it for plantation and crop :(.
I don’t know about what does it eat and is it attracted to lights because I took the photo using flash in the afternoon, and yes it’s alone individual.
This is the other photo, it’s a little bit to the left from the top;

Hopper

But recently December 2013 rainy season here in Indonesia, I got 4 other species similar with the above from the other place but with different color pattern, around this coordinate -6.837636,107.751589 the nearest village in the south is Genteng Village, Tanjungsari, West Java, Indonesia. This place is a well preserved pine forest. I took the picture around 10 am in the morning. Same with the above it’s alone individual and for the size it’s relatively small;around 4-7 mm.

Hopper

Wow Mohamad,
This is much a much more detailed followup from your earlier submission than we expected.  Eric Eaton has already confirmed our suspicions that though they resemble beetles, these insects are more likely Hoppers in the order Hemiptera.  It is interesting that there are so many individuals with similar morphologies, but different colorations.  We suspect that they are most likely in the same family, and perhaps that family is only represented in the tropics.  They might be in the same genus as well.  We hope to hear more from the expert that Eric Eaton wrote that he would contact.

Hopper

Hopper

Thanks Daniel and Eric,
Hope to hear the news about the ID of this bug, because they have this strange looking eye and it’s somehow similar to hover fly face.
Recently Dec 2012 I started to make a blog indobugs.blogspot.com the aim is to give information to the people about what kind of bugs here in Indonesia, because I hardly see sites about it;maybe my info could be useful for them, and your identification is really helpful… thanks again Daniel.

Congratulations on your Blog Mohamad.  We applaud your ambition.

Hopper

Sorry Daniel a little of mistype the last 4 picture is from December 2012 not 2013 :D.

Karl provides a family, subfamily and tribe
Hi Daniel and Mohamad:
I believe most or all of these are Issid Planthoppers (Issidae) in the Subfamily Hemisphaeriinae and Tribe Hemisphaeriini. This includes 13 genera and numerous species, all restricted to east and southeast Asia. Most are very poorly documented online and photos are difficult to find, but similar bug photos can be found under species such as Hemisphaerius, Gergithus and Gergithoides. Regards.  Karl

Thanks a lot for the ID karl and Daniel, and also you gave me another wonderful sites to read.

Eric Eaton also responds January 15, 2013
Ok, Lois O’Brien got back to me late last night about the beetle-like hopper thing from Indonesia.  Apparently it is in the family Issidae, and tribe Hemisphaeriini.  Not much online about them.
Eric

 

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Subject: Beetles
Location: Ranca Upas, Ciwidey, West Java, Indonesia
January 10, 2013 3:06 pm
Hi Daniel,
I take these picture in a forest 2010, there are two beetles.
The first one with black and beautiful brushed like orange colored, I suspect that this one is a lady beetle but I’m not sure.
and the second one I don’t have a clue what is it.
Hope that you could help.
signature: Mohamad Idham Iskandar

Flea Beetle, we believe

Hi Mohamad,
The beetle you believe to be a Lady Beetle is most likely a Flea Beetle, which is a Tribe Alticini within the Leaf Beetle Family Chrysomelidae.  Though it is not an exact match, there are certain similarities between your individual and this photo from Encyclopedia of Life.  The other insect is a puzzler for us and we have requested assistance from Eric Eaton.  While it looks beetle-like, there is something about the eyes that does not seem right.  Do you have any additional photos that show the antennae or mouthparts?  That might help.  Where was this insect found?  Was it feeding on a plant?  Was it a lone individual?  Was it attracted to lights?  Please provide any additional information.  It almost has us thinking it might be a Hemipteran.

What’s That Bug?

Eric Eaton provides some information
Wow!  What a great birthday mystery for me :-)  Definitely some kind of ‘hopper in the Hemiptera order (and you *can* see one antenna, under the eye on the left side of the image), but it is surely a mimic of a beetle, maybe even a lady beetle.  Don’t know where to start….Ooooh, I’ll e-mail this to the wife of the weevil expert, she might know :-)
Eric

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Subject: Found this bug on tomato plants
Location: Southern California in the Long Beach area
December 26, 2012 11:24 pm
Found this bug on tomato plants we were removing. Found in southern California in the Long Beach area. Pictures were taken 11/22/2012. Do you know what this bug is?
Signature: From Thymej

Keeled Treehopper Nymph

Dear Thymej,
You have submitted photos of a Keeled Treehopper Nymph,
Antianthe expansa, and we suspect you did not find an individual on your tomato plants.  Nymphs of the Keeled Treehopper generally live in colonies and they are very wary of humans trying to remove them.  Often the entire colony moves together to the other side of the stem.  The nymphs look very different from adults which are green.  Both adults and nymphs have spiny projections which make them difficult to crush, and also makes them quite unpalatable to birds.  Keeled Treehoppers feed by sucking juices and fluids from tomato plants and others in the family, including peppers and eggplant.  There is an excellent account on Garden Web

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Subject: Leaf Hopper South West Sydney
Location: Campbelltown, Australia
December 22, 2012 1:49 am
I was a post by another person. They didn’t get a chance to take a photo of this bug from the same area I live. I will leave a link on their page if you can post this please :)
Signature: Leafhopper South West Sydney

Unidentified Leafhopper

Thank you for providing us with another view of this still unidentified Leafhopper.  We will continue to research its identity.

Unidentified Leafhopper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination