Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Colorful bug!
Location: Northwest Ohio
June 30, 2014 10:04 am
Hi bugman! I live in Northwest Ohio, and I found this little beauty on my hydrangea. I found it a few weeks ago around the first week of June. Found your site and thought I’d ask if you know what it is! Look forward to hearing from you! Thank you so much!
Signature: Karli Thornton

Candystriped Leafhopper

Candystriped Leafhopper

Hi Karli,
The aptly named Candystriped Leafhopper,
Graphocephala coccinea, though lovely, is not a beneficial insect.  They have mouths designed for piercing plant tissue and sucking nourishing fluids from the plants.  Some Leafhoppers are also suspected of carrying viral infections from plant to plant. 

Thanks for the info!! Sad because it’s such a pretty bug..
Karli Thornton

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bugs all over patio
Location: Aurora, CO
June 12, 2014 6:42 pm
Our patio, planter, and pine tree are covered with these brownish, greyish, and black teeny bugs. The adults are 3mm at most. The legs are striped. Picture was just taken, in mid-June
Signature: Amanda

Giant Conifer Aphid

Giant Conifer Aphid

Hi Amanda,
This is a Giant Conifer Aphid in the genus
Cinara, and you may find more information on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle larva and other?
Location: North East NJ
May 27, 2014 8:06 am
Hello and thank you for this site and your time. If you ever get the time to ID, this insect I would be grateful, however it is just a matter of curiosity and nothing dire so if you get around to it great and if not, thank you anyway. This picture was was taken in North East New Jersey a few days ago in May on a plant lining a pond. The larger one in the center of the photo should be some type of beetle larvae (Uneducated guess). Would you know what type of beetle it is or if I am right? The almost metallic color to it, threw me off and I don’t think it is a ladybird beetle larvae or a dermestid. (Again could be wrong.) Also when I got the pic back and looked at it, I noticed something coming out of it’s posterior. I know larvae are not sexually mature so, not to be gross, is it just pooping or is that a parasite. Lastly I also noticed the smaller red juvenile bugs also, any idea what these are?
As always with or without a response thank you for your work
Signature: Frank Smith

Groundselbush Beetle Larva

Groundselbush Beetle Larva

Hi Frank,
You are  correct about the Beetle Larva.  More specifically, it is the larva of a Groundselbush Beetle,
Trirhabda bacharidis, a species that feeds exclusively on Baccharis.  We are not certain what it is excreting, and we are not certain of their identity, but the tiny red nymphs might be immature Leafhoppers or Spittlebugs.

Thank you so much for your response, it made my day. I learned about a beetle that is new to me, so thanks again! I will follow up and see if I can find any references on what it is excreting or being parasitised by and will keep you posted if I find anything. You people are awesome!
Frank

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that bug?
Location: Ft. Lauderdale, FL
May 16, 2014 3:56 pm
Found this cute little guy hitching a ride on my car in Ft. Lauderdale on May 16.
Signature: Cynthia

Thornhopper

Thorn Treehopper

Hi Cynthia,
This is a male Thorn Treehopper,
Umbonia crassicornis.  You can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.  We have many images on our site of Thorn Treehoppers, however, your individual is quite distinctive.  There is considerable variation in coloring, markings and the development of the “thorn” in this species.  BugGuide has examples of some of the variations.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: From my garden in Southern California
Location: Upland, California
April 15, 2014 10:13 pm
Hi,
I just found these critters on my kale in the garden! I have sprayed horticultural oil once a week for the last couple of weeks but may not have been as diligent in the kale (I am ashamed to admit now!). I am thinking these may be aphids but the color is throwing me off a bit. I guess it could be because they are attacking my green kale plants?
Thanks in advance for your reply!
Wondering in SoCal
Signature: Wondering in SoCal

Aphids

Aphids

Dear Wondering in SoCal,
You are correct that these are Aphids.  By the looks of the young ones, they are reproducing.  You can try hitting them with the strong jet from a hose.  Kale is a sturdy plant that can take the water pressure.

Thank you!  I have made a concoction of tomato leaves and dawn dish detergent to spray, do you think I should use that?  I will also use the hose!
Brooke Meyers

That might work.  We have heard of an organic remedy that involves soaking some cigarette butts in water as the nicotine is effective in controlling some plant pests that suck fluids, like Aphids.

Yea I saw that one too but I would have to touch cigarette butts and those are as disgusting as the aphids!  :)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified reed insect
Location: Gifberg, South Africa (S 31.77 E 18.76)
April 1, 2014 2:41 pm
Dear bugman
I found this insect North of the Cederberg, in South Africa. It jumped into the open 4×4 truck window from some tall grasses/reeds we were driving through. It seemed capable of jumping, although its legs seem incapable of this feat. Any idea what it may be? I am from South Africa but never saw something like this before. Length was approx 20mm.
Signature: Francois

What's That Bug???

What’s That Bug???

Dear Francois,
This has to be one of the most unusual creatures we have ever been asked to identify, and we really don’t know where to begin regarding its classification, except that it is a Hexapod.  We haven’t the time to research this at this moment, so we are posting your photos and we will attempt the identification later today.  Perhaps our readership will take a stab at this while we are away from the office.

What's That Bug???

What’s That Bug???

Karl Identifies Leafhopper
Hi Daniel and Francois:
Given the submission date Daniel, it crossed my mind that you were perhaps being pranked with this one. However, it turns out to be a Restio Leafhopper (Family Cicadellidae: Subfamily Ulopinae: Tribe Cephalelini). These leafhoppers are native to South Africa, Australia and New Zealand, and the common name derives from the fact that all South African members of the Cephalelini are associated exclusively with the Restionaceae plant family. South Africa has 23 species of Restio Leafhoppers in four genera, 18 of which belong to the genus Cephalelus (so odds are that this is one). All the photos I was able to find showed winged individuals so I expect that this one is a juvenile. If you want to know how such a short-legged beast was able to jump into your truck you could check out this site (stop-action photos and description of Cephalelus in action). Regards. Karl

Eric Eaton Identifies Fulgorid Planthopper
Daniel:
Some kind of fulgoroid.  Will have to get back to you later with a more specific answer as I’ll have to look it up and/or query a colleague.
Eric

Update:  Restio Leafhopper
Ariella wrote today in a comment that this is a Restio Leafhopper,
Cephalelus uncinatus, a species pictured on ISpot.

Update from Chris Dietrich
It’s a nymph of the leafhopper (Cicadellidae) genus Cephalelus, which belongs to a tribe that is disjunct in South Africa and Australia.  They feed only on Restionaceae.
-Chris

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination