Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Whats that bug?
Location: Nashville, TN
August 4, 2012 2:22 pm
Mr Bugman,
This lil bug was on my corn. What is it?
Thanks!
Signature: Jen

Broad Headed Sharpshooter

Dear Jen,
This is a Broad Headed Sharpshooter,
Oncometopia orbona, and though BugGuide does not list the plants upon which it is known to feed, if you are finding significant numbers of them on your corn, we expect they might be doing significant damage.  Planthoppers and Sharpshooters with their piercing and sucking mouthparts can initially damage plants because they take valuable fluids from young shoots by feeding on sap, but some species can also spread viruses and other pathogens to the plants they feed upon.

Wow! Thanks for the quick reply. This was the first one ive noticed… Ill be watching for more. Too pretty to hurt :(
Thanks for the help!
Jen

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pls identify this bug
Location: Kottaya District,KeralaState, India
July 31, 2012 12:01 am
Could you Pls identify this bug ? . I took this pictures.
Signature: Honestly speaking, I donno what it means :D

Hopper Nymph

This is the nymph of one of the Hoppers in the insect order Homoptera.

Dear Daniel Marlos
Thank you for prompt reply and cooperation. I was struggling to get some information about the bug.Your reply helped me a lot !! .  You are doing a great service to persons like me. May God bless you :) :)
Have A NiceDay :)
Keep In Touch :)
-Santhosh

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Chinese white spotted black bug
Location: China – about 2 hours from Beijing
July 4, 2012 12:22 am
Can you assist?
It sort of looks like a weevil?
With thanks,
Signature: David

White Cicada Nymph from China

Hi David,
Though it is a Fulgorid Planthopper and not a true Cicada, this nymph is known as a White Cicada.

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Green lacewing larva eating an aphid
Location: Naperville, IL
May 9, 2012 8:02 pm
Hi Daniel~
It’s bug season once more! I have lacewing eggs all over my 2-foot-tall milkweed, and the little aphid lions are busily eating their preferred prey. Here are a few shots from today of one that was moving pretty quickly, all the while sucking its victim dry. I am not sure of the identity of the critter under the larva’s front left leg in the first photo.
All the best,
-Dori
Signature: -Dori Eldridge

Green Lacewing Larva eats Aphid

Dear Dori,
We are happy warm weather has hit Illinois because we always love getting your submissions.  We couldn’t decide which of your three photos was the best documentation of this predation, so we are posting one where the Green Lacewing Larva’s formidable mandibles can be clearly seen and another where the Aphid is clearly visible.  Meanwhile, we need to go outside and remove Milkweed Aphids from our native milkweed.  The proliferation of oleander in Los Angeles sustains the Aphids when milkweed is not available.

Green Lacewing Larva eats Aphid

Thanks so much, Daniel.  I can’t tell you how much I enjoy your site and your insight.  By the way, how do you remove your problem aphids?  On my hibiscus trees, I just use the garden sprayer set a notch or two below power wash.  But on the milkweed plants, where I have to be selective, I actually remove those orange oleander aphids by hand with a damp rag.  If I ignore the aphids too long, my plants become overrun by ants – not a good thing when trying to raise Monarchs.  I’ve collected nearly 100 Monarch eggs in the last 24 hours!  Have a lovely evening, and happy spring!

The plants are young native Narrow-Leafed Milkweed, Asclepias fascicularis, and there are no caterpillars at this point, so I sprayed the Aphids with a water bottle that had a small quantity of liquid dish soap.  The Argentine Ants move the Aphids about and that invasive exotic ant species is a huge problem here in Southern California.

 

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A Child’s Question
Location: Falls Church, VA (Northern Virginia)
May 3, 2012 8:26 pm
A child at my school asked me what this was today and I figured I’d best ask you!
Signature: Nicole

Treehopper

Hi Nicole,
First off we want to compliment on this beautiful saturated color photograph of a Oak Treehopper, Platycotis vittata, which we identified on BugGuide where it is described as:  “Grayish spotted with yellow, or turquoise with red stripes and red eyes. With or without a thorn-like horn.  This species may be easily distinguished from all our other species of membracids (except Umbonia and Lephopelta) by its very short posterior tarsi. It usually has a long compressed pronotal horn which varies greatly in length and may be entirely absent. The wing venation shows considerable variation. Green body color, mottled or speckled with orange. (Dozier 1920)”.

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Beautiful Red and Blue Coloured Cicada
Location: Costa Rica
April 28, 2012 12:32 pm
Dear Bugman,
I encountered this beautiful Cicada last week in Costa Rica, however, I cannot find any information or pictures of it on the internet. Could you tell me which species it is? Thanks in advance. Kind regards, Sjoerd Biesmans
Signature: ?

Treehopper

Dear Sjoerd,
We do not recognize this insect and we have not had any luck in our initial search of the internet with regards to identifying it.  While it is Cicada-like, we are not totally convinced it is a true Cicada.  It might be some other Free-Living Hemipteran in the suborder Auchenorrhyncha that also included Treehoppers as well as Cicadas, and we have our suspicions that this might be some species of Treehopper in the family Fulgoridae.  See BugGuidefor some North American representatives of the family Fulgoridae.  There is something about the front legs and eyes that makes us doubt that this is a Cicada. 
Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in this identification.

Not Cicada, rather a Treehopper

Dear Daniel,
Thanks for your response. I’ve been looking around a bit more also to find out exactly what kind of unusually beautiful cicada-like bug this is.
The closest I’ve come so far is that it is most likely a plant or tree hopper indeed, probably a Scaralis spp.  Yet I’m not sure which one.
What are your thoughts on this? Thanks for the effort.
Kind regards.
Sjoerd Biesmans

Treehopper

 Thanks to your research, we believe we may have identified your Treehopper as Scaralis neotropicalis on Encyclopedia of Life.  It is one of the Fulgorid Treehoppers based on information on the AnimalBase website.

Hi Daniel,
I’ve looked at neotropicalis also and though it looks very similar, it seems to be lacking the blue on the abdomen and the blue/white vein like structures in the wings.
I think it is Scaralis for sure, but I’m not sure if it is neotropicalis. On the other hand, in this illustration:
http://scientificillustration.tumblr.com/post/17936839305/tab-5-laternaria-1-species-poblicia-2
the one looking most like my picture would indeed be Domitia (thus Scaralis) neotropicalis, but the one in the picture on encyclopedia of life seems more like a Domitia miscella..
Complicated… Seems like some of the webpages might have their facts wrong…
Thanks again, kind regards.
Sjoerd Biesmans

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination