Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Chromatic Bug and white bugwith strange wings
Location: Ecuador, cloud forest
April 21, 2015 10:14 am
Mr. Bugman
I’m a photographer from Ecuador South America, I love taking nature pics in remote places in my country, since a couple years back I benn exploring the field of macro photography, and on a travel I found this bug that I couldn’t identify, the picture isn’t much clear, the insect was to fast to take a better pic.
I’m also sending you a pic of another bug that I never seen before, the picture quality is a little bit better.
hope you can help me out
Signature: Charly

Leafhopper

Leafhopper

Dear Charly,
The “chromatic bug” is a Leafhopper or Sharpshooter in the family Cicadellidae, and though we located a matching image on FlickR, it is not identified to the species level.  An image on American Insects is identified as being in the genus
Beirneola.  Your white winged insect is a Plume Moth in the family Pterophoridae.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Good or Bad Plant Bug
Location: Colfax, CA
April 18, 2015 10:23 pm
Attached are pictures of a bug found on the stem and leaves of some flowers we just potted. I don’t know if they are good for the flowers or not and I have not seen it before. I also can’t seem to find anything online when I researched it. Please help!
Signature: -Amy D

Oak Treehopper

Oak Treehopper

Dear Amy,
Good and bad are so relative, and there are many extenuating circumstances when making such evaluations.  We generally think of problematic insects as those that are introduced from other locations if they are able to get established and have no natural predators, because they often crowd out native species.  This Oak Treehopper,
Platycotis vittata, is a species that we get frequent identification requests regarding, but those requests are almost always from Florida.  We thought this might be an introduction from a nursery, but upon researching the Oak Treehopper on BugGuide, we learned that it is found along the west coast of North America as well.  According to BugGuide:  “Forests and forest edges, parks, and anywhere Oak trees are found. Occasionally found on other trees, but these individuals were probably just resting on those non-Oak trees. … Does almost no damage to the host trees—leaves only a few twig scars from oviposition.”

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this tiny moth/
Location: San Francisc, Nayarit, Mexico
April 6, 2015 6:22 pm
Found in San Francisc, Nayarit, Mexico north of Puerto Vallarta
Signature: Bob

Treehopper

Treehopper

Dear Bob,
This is not a moth, but rather a Treehopper, and we have identified it as
Membracis mexicana thanks to a FlickR posting.  We verified that on the FAUNA ENTOMOLOGICA DE NICARAGUA site.

AWESOME!  it is such a beautiful insect,  I needed to know what it was…You guys Rock!
Bob Farmer

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is it poisonous?
Location: Sand springs oklahoma
April 7, 2015 6:33 am
Trying to figure out what this is … Found it by a rose bed filled with weeds … Was all over the wood logs
Signature: I don’t know lol

Aphid

Aphid

This is an Aphid, an insect reviled by rose growers because Aphids multiply rapidly without even mating, through an asexual reproductive process known as parthenogenesis, and because Aphids feed by sucking fluids from the young growth on plants including flower buds, but Aphids are not poisonous.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: red eyed one horned flying fuzzy footed cutie
Location: Kissimmee, Florida
April 4, 2015 2:17 pm
Hello, I saved this lil guy from a watery grave in Central Florida. I’ve searched google with no success. Also, he wad tiny. Thanks for the help!
Signature: DeanaFeral

Oak Treehopper

Oak Treehopper

Dear DeanaFeral,
Almost all of our identification requests for Oak Treehoppers,
Platycotis vittata, come from Florida.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Boring insect larvae in SoCal Mimosa tree
Location: Escondido, California
March 22, 2015 4:13 pm
We planted a Mimosa tree (Albizia julibrissin, a.k.a. Silk Tree) 6 weeks ago, and it just started budding out during the recent warm weather. Unfortunately, we are also now seeing insect larvae coming out of some of the small branches. Now that we know what to look for, we see dried up wounds in other parts of the tree, presumably from a previous season’s larval activity. The attached photo, showing active larvae, is of a branch about 1/2 inch in diameter. Can you identify this insect, and do you know of any treatment?
We are in Escondido, CA, which is 20 miles north of San Diego and 10 miles inland.
Thanks!
Signature: Joe Rowley

Mealybug Nymphs and Argentine Ant in attendance.

Mealybug Nymphs and Argentine Ant in attendance.

Dear Joe,
These are not wood boring insects.  They are nymphs of plant parasitic Hemipterans, most probably Mealybugs in the family Pseudococcidae.
  You can use BugGuide for comparison.  It appears that is a vile Argentine Ant in attendance.  The invasive, exotic Argentine Ant will move plant parasitic Hemipterans from plant to plant, and they tend to them and protect them.  We believe the plant was damaged, and the wound provided a food source for the nutrient sucking Mealybugs.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination