Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle
Location: Minneapolis, MN
August 9, 2014 7:25 pm
This photograph was taken 7-15-14 in Minneapolis, MN. The beetles are on a raspberry plant in our garden. (We had the rainiest June on record & July was also very rainy.) Curious to know what these are.
Signature: Jodie Walters

Mating Candystriped Leafhoppers

Mating Candystriped Leafhoppers

Dear Jodie,
Though they are colorful and quite pretty, these Candystriped Leafhoppers,
Graphocephala coccinea, are not beneficial insects in the garden.  Like Aphids, they are fluid sucking Hemipterans that might spread viral infections from plant to plant.  According to BugGuide:  “Several species [of Leafhoppers] are serious crop pests; some transmit plant pathogens (viruses, mycoplasma-like organisms, etc.)”  We are not certain if the Candystriped Leafhopper is one of the virus spreading species.  Dave’s Garden discusses the negative and neutral comments regarding the Candystriped Leafhopper.  According to the Boston Harbor Islands All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory:  “It is thought that candy-striped leafhoppers may be one of several leafhopper species that transmit the bacteria which cause Pierce’s disease between plants as they are feeding. This disease can kill grape vines and other woody plants.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID request: red eyed horned flying insect
Location: Victoria, BC Canada
August 7, 2014 12:47 pm
Hi. See attached photo. This bug landed on me while in my garden in Victoria, BC Canada in June 2014. I think you’ll agree it is very beautiful, do you know what it is?
Signature: Curious in Victoria

Oak Treehopper

Oak Treehopper

Dear Curious in Victoria,
Most of our reports of Oak Treehoppers,
Platycotis vittata, come from Florida, though BugGuide does indicate that the species is found along the Pacific coast, including British Columbia.

Thanks Daniel. That makes sense, we have several Gary Oak trees on our property. But in 12 yrs at this address, I’ve never seen one of these rather interesting insects.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: yellow worm/ larvae/ milkweed plants
Location: traprockridge Plainville CT
August 7, 2014 12:54 am
Here is an aadditional photo to add to my original question of what are the yellow larvae worm ? things eating the milkweed pods. You can also see the red beetle to the left.
Signature: hopefish

Aphid Infestation and Lady Beetle on Milkweed

Aphid Infestation and Lady Beetle on Milkweed

Dear hopefish,
We did not see any additional submission from you.  You have a major infestation of Milkweed Aphids or Oleander Aphids, Aphis nerii, and since Aphids release honeydew, it also appears you are getting a black buildup on the plant.  None of this is healthy since Aphids suck juices from plants.  The beetle is a predatory Lady Beetle, but that single Lady Beetle will not put a dent in this Aphid infestation.  We would recommend attempting to control the Aphid population, but without pesticides as those will have an injurious effect on other creatures that feed on milkweed, including Monarch butterfly caterpillars.  See BugGuide for additional information on the Oleander Aphid.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cannibis Eater?
Location: Central Calif, USA (city of Bakersfield)
July 29, 2014 7:59 pm
We have found these 4 winged “flies” on our cannabis plant. Are they insect or plant eaters?
So far they haven’t eaten me!
Signature: Lynn

Sharpshooter

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter

Hi Lynn,
Your images are very tiny and not of the highest quality, so we enlarged them and enhanced them for posting, but we prefer high resolution, high quality images for identification purposes.  This appears to be some species of Leafhopper or Sharpshooter, and there are many agricultural pests in the family.  Leafhoppers suck the juices from plants, and some species are known to spread viral infections to plants.  Our best guess is that this is a Glassy Winged Sharpshooter,
Homalodisca vitripennis, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide, it is:  “A major vector of Pierce’s disease on grape. Usually not a serious pest within its native range, this sp. was introduced into so. California, where it has become a serious threat to viticulture.”  We attempted to locate any documentation on the relationship between Glassy Winged Sharpshooters and Marijuana, and we did find a different species of Sharpshooter feeding on Marijuana on the FloraFinder site.  The University of California Davis Integrated Pest Management site has an excellent article on the Glassy Winged Sharpshooter, and though we scanned it, we could not find a reference to marijuana. 

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Fort MIll, SC
July 21, 2014 1:12 pm
Just took a photo of this dude. Can you identify it for me. The only picture I found of it on the net also did not identify it. Thanks. Keep buggin’
Signature: Dr.Weetabix

Treehopper

Treehopper

Dear Dr. Weetabix,
Three days ago, we posted an image of this Treehopper which we identified as
Entylia carinata.  The two images are so similar that at first we thought this was a duplicate submission.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: insect indentification
Location: Oklahoma
July 19, 2014 9:15 pm
Can you please help identify this insect?
Signature: Abigail

Treehopper

Treehopper

Dear Abigail,
We believe we have correctly identified your Treehopper as
Entylia carinata, based on this image posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, they feed on:  “various herbaceous plants, especially Asteraceae” and “Commonly seen to be attended by ants” which form a symbiotic relationship with plant sucking insects like Aphids and Treehoppers because the Ants feed on the honeydew secreted by many free-living Hemipterans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination