Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug on hibiscus
Location: Plant city, fl
May 25, 2016 6:44 am
I saw this bug on a winter hibiscus flower. Please help identify.
Signature: Jackke

Weevil and Aphids

Weevil and Aphids

Dear Jackke,
The larger insect in your image is a Weevil, and there are numerous smaller Aphids visible as well.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sudan Africa bug
Location: South Sudan
May 16, 2016 9:47 am
Hi bugman –
We are trying to identify this bug. It was found last week in Werkok Sudan. Werkok is in South Sudan close to Bor. It is approximately 1.5″ long.
Signature: PCC

Fulgorid Planthopper

Fulgorid Planthopper

Dear PCC,
This is a Planthopper in the family Fulgoridae, sometimes called Lanternflies.  Your individual looks similar to this individual from Malawi posted to Beetles of Africa.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown bug
Location: Southwesr kansas.
May 18, 2016 4:51 pm
Found about 6 or 7 of these on my sweatshirt when was cutting branches off tree. Not sure what they are.
Signature: Chaz

Giant Willow Aphid

Giant Willow Aphid

Dear Chaz,
Were you by chance pruning a willow or a cottonwood tree?  This is a Giant Willow Aphid,
Tuberolachnus salignus, a species that according to BugGuide is:  “Non native, introduced from Europe around 1872. Considered a minor pest.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please help identify
Location: Feilding New Zealand
May 15, 2016 9:58 pm
I found quite a few of these crawling around on my outdoor table and occasionally on me. Just want to know what they are and if they are a known pest or harmless.
Signature: Narelle

Giant Willow Aphid

Giant Willow Aphid

Dear Narelle,
We believe we have correctly identified this Aphid as a Giant Willow Aphid,
Tuberolachnus salignus, a species that according to Farm Forestry New Zealand:  ” was first found in New Zealand on 23 Dec 2013 at Western Springs Park, Auckland by entomologist Stephen Thorpe. Surprisingly, subsequent surveys have revealed that it is already well established throughout much of New Zealand.”  The site also states:  “Large dense colonies of the giant willow aphid form over summer. Reproduction occurs asexually with no males having ever been found, thus the aphids in these colonies are typically clones. The aphids are noted to be long lived, with winged individuals in particular displaying lengthy maternal care of their offspring. In Great Britain colonies are apparent from mid-summer into late winter, after which the aphids curiously disappear in spring. We may expect to see a similar trend in New Zealand with T. salignus present between December and July.”  More information on the Giant Willow Aphid can be found on the Study of Northern Virginia Ecology site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Costa Rica Bug
Location: Limón Province, Costa Rica
May 9, 2016 6:53 pm
I watched this insect lay her eggs and then seal the nest with some sealant she excreted from her abdomen. I’ll include the three photo of her and her nest, her laying an egg, and her sealing up the chambers. Do you know what her name is?
Signature: sarah

Fulgorid Planthopper laying Eggs

Fulgorid Planthopper laying Eggs

Dear Sarah,
We really love your images of a Planthopper in the family Fulgoridae laying eggs.  We quickly identified her as
Copidocephala guttata on FlickR, and then we found a similar egg laying image on Neotropical Arthropods.  There is another nice image on Kunzweb Gallery.  Many Planthoppers secrete a waxy substance, and we speculate that you witnessed that secretion.  According to an online article entitled Trophobiosis between a Blattellid Cockroach (Macrophyllodromia spp.) and Fulgorids (Enchophora and Copidocephala spp.) in Costa Rica:  “Copidocephala guttata (White) occurs in Costa Rica, Honduras, Mexico, and Panama (O’Brien 1988).  Many fulgorids produce large amounts of waxes and in a few species these materials have been chemically analyzed.  Their biological role is essentially unknown, except that ‘ … one of the apparent functions of these waxy, plume-like tails is protection against predators and parasites’ (Mason et al., 1989).”

Fulgorid Planthopper laying Eggs

Fulgorid Planthopper laying Eggs

Oh, thanks so much for your reply. There were numerous Facebook people asking, and one of them reminded me of your site. I think I used you once before for a similar type of bug with that wild waxy adornment to her abdomen. Totally forgot that.
I hope you will feel free to use my photos on your site for others to use for ID.
Weren’t those amazing captures? And with an iPhone no less.
The small things in life are the most amazing.
Warm regards,
Sarah Morgan
Punta Uva, Limón, Costa Rica

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: insecten
Location: in de tuin in nederland
May 4, 2016 11:38 am
de Bugman
Ik stuur u een foto van een insect waarvan ik niet weet wat het is
Signature: Marinus

Aphid

Aphid

Dear Marinus,
This is an Aphid.  Aphids are generally considered garden pests because they suck nourishment from plants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination