Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
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Subject: Bugs on privet hedge
Location: Kenya
September 28, 2014 6:27 am
Hi, we have an infestation on our privet hedges and originally thought it was a mould or fungus, however on closer inspection it appears to be an insect, they are less than 1mm long and are killing our hedges, the leaves turn sticky and black and then die and fall off leaving the privet bare – it does however seem to be re-sprouting, have attached some photos – any ideas what this is and how we can control it?
Signature: Thanks so much

Mite or Hemipteran??

Crawler:  Immature Scale Insect

Wow, we are totally stumped on this, though we believe we have narrowed the possibilities to two totally unrelated groups.  First we should state that insects have three pairs of legs and a pair of antennae, and arachnids have four pairs of legs (five pairs if pedipalps are included).  When we first viewed the thumbnails that are attached to emails we receive, it appeared that your creature had three antennae, but upon viewing the larger attachment, we cannot tell if we are looking at antennae or a fourth pair of legs.  The body of these creatures resembles the body on many immature Hemipterans, which are classified as insects, but the first pair of appendages, has us confused.  We cannot tell if the first pair of appendages is a pair of antennae or a pair of legs.  If antennae, then we are relatively certain these are immature Hemipterans, possibly True Bugs in the suborder Heteroptera.  True Bugs have mouths designed to pierce and suck, and many species feed on plants, causing damage that might include leaf loss.  Mites, which are Arachnids and which have four pairs of legs, might also cause damage to plants.  Since you did not indicate any larger individuals, we are speculating that these are Mites as many species are quite small, especially since you indicate they are only about 1 mm in size.  We are going to seek a more professional opinion on your request, and we are also going to feature your submission on our scrolling feature bar.  We thought we might have gotten lucky when we learned there is a Privet Mite, Brevipalpus obovatus, but your individuals look nothing like those pictured on Doctor Optimara or those on the North Carolina University site.

Thanks for the response, I will see if I can get some more photos of them today and send them over.
Kind regards,
Daniel.

Hemipterans or Mites???

Immature Scale Insects known as Crawlers

Eric Eaton provides a category:  Immature Hemipterans
Daniel:
Wow!  These appear to be “crawlers,” the immature stage of some kind of scale insect (Hemiptera:  Sternorrhyncha).  Outstanding pics.  If I get around to doing any more research on these (it is late Sunday night), I’ll pass along my findings.  Knowing the food plant helps a good deal.
Eric

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Subject: Insect
Location: Central Kentucky
September 12, 2014 2:54 pm
This landed on a zipper and I have never seen a bug like this.
Signature: Hblevins

Immature Oak Treehopper

Immature Oak Treehopper

Dear Hblevins,
This is an immature Oak Treehopper,
Platycotis vittata, and you may verify our identification by comparing your image to this image on Bugguide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug :)
Location: Humansdorp, Eastern Cape, South Africa
September 4, 2014 3:06 pm
Hi there. I am keen to find out what this is, found in the Eastern cape area – Humansdorp. Thanks. Natz
Signature: Natz the big big geek

Red Insect

Red Insect

Dear Natz the big big geek,
Even though the markings on the wings of this insect are quite unusual and distinctive, there isn’t enough detail for us to determine an order to begin searching for an identification.  We are posting your image and we hope to eventually be able to provide you with some identificaton.

Hi Daniel and Natz the big big geek:
This is a Spittlebug (Family Cercopidae), Rhinaulax analis. Common names appear to include Honeycombwing Spittlebug, Red Fynbos Spittlebug, or just Fynbos Spittlebug (it also comes in a yellow form). Most online images provide a tentative identification but the Field Guide to Insects of South Africa confirms the identification (pages 154 and 155. As far as I can tell it is endemic to South Africa and is common in Fynbos vegetation. Regards. Karl

Thanks for doing all this research Karl.  We suspected it was classified in the order Hemiptera.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Gray-blue Fly
Location: Chiang Mai (northern Thailand).
September 4, 2014 6:27 pm
Hi, I saw this small fly (first thought was Drosophila) sitting on my orchids.
The body is about 4 mm lang, the wings about 8 mm.
Signature: Ricci

Derbid Planthopper:  Proutista moesta

Derbid Planthopper: Proutista moesta

Dear Ricci,
We quickly identified your Derbid Planthopper as
Proutista moesta thanks to the Foto Biodiversitas Indonesia website.

Derbid Planthopper:  Proutista moesta

Derbid Planthopper: Proutista moesta

Thank you Daniel,
and it’s bad ;-)
http://www.cabdirect.org/abstracts/20033042539.html

Hi again Ricci,
The order Hemiptera, which includes Aphids and Scale Insects as well as many plant feeding True Bugs like Stink Bugs, has a large percentage of significant agricultural pests.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle
Location: Minneapolis, MN
August 9, 2014 7:25 pm
This photograph was taken 7-15-14 in Minneapolis, MN. The beetles are on a raspberry plant in our garden. (We had the rainiest June on record & July was also very rainy.) Curious to know what these are.
Signature: Jodie Walters

Mating Candystriped Leafhoppers

Mating Candystriped Leafhoppers

Dear Jodie,
Though they are colorful and quite pretty, these Candystriped Leafhoppers,
Graphocephala coccinea, are not beneficial insects in the garden.  Like Aphids, they are fluid sucking Hemipterans that might spread viral infections from plant to plant.  According to BugGuide:  “Several species [of Leafhoppers] are serious crop pests; some transmit plant pathogens (viruses, mycoplasma-like organisms, etc.)”  We are not certain if the Candystriped Leafhopper is one of the virus spreading species.  Dave’s Garden discusses the negative and neutral comments regarding the Candystriped Leafhopper.  According to the Boston Harbor Islands All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory:  “It is thought that candy-striped leafhoppers may be one of several leafhopper species that transmit the bacteria which cause Pierce’s disease between plants as they are feeding. This disease can kill grape vines and other woody plants.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID request: red eyed horned flying insect
Location: Victoria, BC Canada
August 7, 2014 12:47 pm
Hi. See attached photo. This bug landed on me while in my garden in Victoria, BC Canada in June 2014. I think you’ll agree it is very beautiful, do you know what it is?
Signature: Curious in Victoria

Oak Treehopper

Oak Treehopper

Dear Curious in Victoria,
Most of our reports of Oak Treehoppers,
Platycotis vittata, come from Florida, though BugGuide does indicate that the species is found along the Pacific coast, including British Columbia.

Thanks Daniel. That makes sense, we have several Gary Oak trees on our property. But in 12 yrs at this address, I’ve never seen one of these rather interesting insects.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination