Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
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Subject: unknown pink colored bug
Location: Moorestown, NJ
July 25, 2015 7:13 pm
This bug was found in my flower garden on 7/25/15. I am not sure what it is, but it “pops” similar to a click beetle and is about 1/4-1/2″ long. I have been unable to find any information in any of the books that I have and was wondering if you have any suggestions?
I really enjoy your website and have learned a lot from looking through the information found here. Your hard work is greatly appreciated.
Thank you for your time.
Signature: Curious in NJ

Leafhopper Nymph

Leafhopper Nymph

Dear Curious in NJ,
Thanks for sending in the higher resolution images we requested.  This is a Leafhopper nymph, and immature individuals can be very difficult to identify with certainty.  We suspect based on its resemblance to this BugGuide image, that your individual may be an immature
Gyponana species.  This BugGuide image of Gyponana tenella is a strong candidate for your species.

Leafhopper Nymph

Leafhopper Nymph

Thank you very much for your time.  I really appreciate the information. My grandfather was an entomologist for many years and instilled a love of bugs in me as well.  I think the work you do on this website is really amazing!  Please keep the information available for all to find!
Thank you again,
Brenda Emmert

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: please help identify this thing :)
Location: New Jersey, close to the coast.
July 20, 2015 5:49 pm
Hello there, I was sitting in my yard when i saw this little guy on my hand. No idea how it got there, but then I put it on my pant leg and took a picture. No one I showed it to has seen anything like it, not with those blue “butthairs” anyway. What is it???
Signature: just a Jersey girl

Planthopper Nymph

Planthopper Nymph

Dear Jersey Girl,
Immature Hemipterans can be very difficult to accurately identify, but we believe we have correctly identified this as an immature Issid Planthopper,
Thionia simplex, based on this BugGuide image.  The “butthairs” explained on BugGuide:  “in nymphs, the wax filaments projecting from the rear are straight and bundled, not bushy.”

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug found in evergreen
Location: Brisbane, California
July 3, 2015 8:56 pm
Hello,
The kiddos were climbing around in a tall evergreen today. A fellow parent noticed a mound of bugs that spread out to what you see in the photo. Any idea what they are?
Location: Northern California
Found: July 3, 2015
Thanks!
Signature: Irja

Giant Conifer Aphids

Giant Conifer Aphids

Dear Irja,
That tree is infested with Giant Conifer Aphids in the genus
Cinara.  According to BugGuide:  “If it’s big, and on a conifer, it’s probably Cinara. To identify further, it’s usually necessary to identify the host plant, and consider the geographic range of different species. … The genus is widespread, but individual species are often limited by the range of their hosts.”

Giant Conifer Aphids

Giant Conifer Aphids

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: apple tree infestation
Location: Guildford Surrey
June 28, 2015 10:38 am
Hi, I found lots of these climbing on my apple tree. There was also a type of white fungus around which some of them congregated – this possibly contains eggs?
I don’t know if they are bad for the tree or not. They measure approx. 1cm, but some are slightly smaller. They have 6 legs but the back part of their body looks like a caterpillar.
I hope you can help.
Signature: Barbara

Lady Beetle Larvae eat Hemipterans

Lady Beetle Larvae eat Hemipterans

Dear Barbara,
While there is a pest problem on your apple tree, nature seems to be controlling the situation.  What you have mistaken for fungus or eggs is actually a type of Hemipteran, possibly a Woolly Aphid which you can read about on the Royal Horticultural Society site.  The crawling insects are the larvae of Lady Beetles, and they are feeding on the Hemipterans.   The bad news here is that the Lady Beetle Larva is an Asian Lady Beetle Larva, a nonnative species, and it is believed that the proliferation of nonnative Asian Lady Beetles in North America is contributing to the decline in numbers of native species.

Lady Beetle Larva

Lady Beetle Larva

Hi Daniel,
Thank you so much for the information – so it is good news and bad news!
Since posting, many of the larva have now attached their back ends to the tree bark and are hanging upside down, obviously in preparation for their next stage of development.  Also, there is now very little evidence of the ‘white fluff’ so they have probably done their job.  Unfortunately, many of the leaves on the tree are not looking very healthy but I am loathe to spray anything and just let nature take its course so I can review the tree in the autumn (it is past its prime anyway).
Thank you again for your help.
Regards
Barbara

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: weird bug in Virginia
Location: Southwest Virginia, on the border of Smyth & Wythe counties
June 4, 2015 12:46 pm
Bugman, I was sitting on a chair in the yard of our farmland in southwest Virginia when I noticed this bug on my knee. He moved slooooowly and his feet were really stuck to my pants. I’ve never seen this kind of bug before. What is it?
Signature: Lilli, not like the flower

Treehopper

Treehopper

Dear Lilli,
This is some species of Treehopper in the family Membracidae, and many members have spinelike or leaflike protuberances on their dorsal surfaces that help to camouflage them when they are feeding on plants.  The closest match we could find on BugGuide is this image of
Helonica excelsa.

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Subject: What are these?
Location: Washington, DC
May 18, 2015 5:39 pm
Today, 05/18/05, I took this picture on a tree in Washington, DC. I thought they were spiders at first, and then I noticed that a couple have wings! I’ve done a ton of internet research and I can’t find anything like them. Please help!
Signature: ?

Giant Conifer Aphids

Giant Bark Aphids

These are Giant Bark Aphids, Longistigma caryae, the largest Aphids in North America.

Oh my god, thank you SO much!!!  They sure are! :)

As an unrelated aside, we learned this morning while watching CNN that the popular internet initials OMG have another meaning.  The report on the Waco, Texas melee refers to the Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs as OMG.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination