Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
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Subject: Soft but spiny
Location: Austin, Texas
April 28, 2016 4:56 pm
This little guy was found eating sunflower seedlings. I have never seen anything like it! Is it adult or a nymph? Please help identify! Thank you!
Signature: MK Pope

Treehopper Nymph

Treehopper Nymph

Dear MK Pope,
This is a Treehopper Nymph from the family Membracidae, but our quick search did not produce a species match.  You can try browsing BugGuide for a species identity.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: These aren’t salamanders!
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
April 25, 2016 9:32 am
Hi BugMan,
I was recently on a salamander hunt in an urban forest environment when I came across the following nest under a rock. I leaned in close and was surprised to see that the round white ones had legs (and antennae) and were not just larvae as I had thought. I’ve included two photos: the first being the overall view of the hole beneath the rock and the second a closer view of the larvae (?).
We’ve had some issues in the recent past in the Halifax region in Nova Scotia with fire ants creeping up and I thought I may have come across one of their nests while in the woods (“woods” used very loosely as I can see houses if I squint and hear the highway in close proximity). After spending awhile searching through the life cycles of various ant types, I then wondered if perhaps I had happened across ants feeding upon the larvae of another insect. I’m hoping you’re able to clear up my my confusion, but in the meantime I’ll keep searching – maybe the actual paper insect ID book might be helpful.
If it makes any difference, the area where I found the nest is a few metres away from a small area of wetland and we have had a relatively mild winter so there was not a lot of snow melt.
Signature: NatureGirl

Citronella Ants tend Root Aphids

Citronella Ants tend Root Aphids

Dear NatureGirl,
You have happened across Ants, but instead of “feeding upon the larvae of another insect” they are harvesting honeydew from Aphids.  We did not recognize either your yellow ants or the white Aphids, so we searched on the web and quickly found the Cornell blog New York State IPM Program and a posting of Citronella Ants caring for or tending Root Aphids.  The site states:  “The life and habits of citronella ants aren’t well-studied, but they do have one fascinating trait. They tend herds of underground aphids, known as root aphids as if they were cattle, and harvesting sweet honeydew excreted by the sap-loving aphids. Root aphids feed on the roots of shrubs and plants.”  Additional images and information can be found on Wild About Ants, Scientific American and BugGuide.  

Citronella Ants tend Root Aphids

Citronella Ants tend Root Aphids

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Small brown bug
Location: Dallas, tx
April 10, 2016 7:24 pm
We found this bug in our house and are stumped. What is it?
Signature: Greg

Treehopper

Treehopper

Dear Greg,
This is a Treehopper in the family Membracidae, and we believe, based on BugGuide images, that it is in the genus
Cyrtolobus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Arizona
March 29, 2016 12:34 pm
Just curious to know what this is. I found it on one of my tomato plants.
Signature: Andrew Chace

Aphids

Aphids

Dear Andrew,
You have Aphids on your tomato plants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Peruvian Insect
Location: Peru
March 30, 2016 3:01 pm
Hey my sister just got back from Peru and snapped this picture. Please help identify, obviously. Not sure if it is supposed to look this way or some sort of fungus is growing out of it. Either way, personally found it to be a very disturbing.
Signature: Ian

Amazon Roostertail

Amazon Roostertailgj

Dear Ian,
The common name of this Fulgorid Planthopper is the Amazon Roostertail.  It does not have a fungus, but the “tail” is actually a waxy secretion.  We had to lighten up your underexposed file, so the colors are not as saturated as they should be.

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Subject: Unknown Insect
Location: 14.1667°N 75.0333°E
March 23, 2016 1:59 am
Hello Sir,
I was on travel to Western Ghats of India and was able to capture a insect/bug in Macro mode, Tried with National Geographic, but they re-directed towards you.
Just wanted to know the species of the insect.
I have attached the picture for your reference.
Below is the link to my Your Shot profile:
http://yourshot.nationalgeographic.com/photos/7951851/
Signature: Ravindra Kulkarni

Long Winged Derbid Planthopper

Long Winged Derbid Planthopper

Dear Ravindra,
This is a Long Winged Derbid Planthopper in the family Derbidae.  SinoBug has some nice images of Chinese Derbid Planthoppers and Project Noah has a similar looking individual from New Guinea identified as
Proutista moestaCabDirect states:  “The plant hopper Proutista moesta is an economically important sap-sucking insect of palms and is implicated as a common vector of root (wilt) disease of coconut, yellow leaf disease of arecanut and spear rot disease of oil palm in Kerala, India. The adults are sap-feeding, while its nymphs develop saprophytically by feeding on substrates undergoing fungal decomposition.”  This FlickR image was taken in India.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination