Currently viewing the category: "Ants"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Boring insect larvae in SoCal Mimosa tree
Location: Escondido, California
March 22, 2015 4:13 pm
We planted a Mimosa tree (Albizia julibrissin, a.k.a. Silk Tree) 6 weeks ago, and it just started budding out during the recent warm weather. Unfortunately, we are also now seeing insect larvae coming out of some of the small branches. Now that we know what to look for, we see dried up wounds in other parts of the tree, presumably from a previous season’s larval activity. The attached photo, showing active larvae, is of a branch about 1/2 inch in diameter. Can you identify this insect, and do you know of any treatment?
We are in Escondido, CA, which is 20 miles north of San Diego and 10 miles inland.
Thanks!
Signature: Joe Rowley

Mealybug Nymphs and Argentine Ant in attendance.

Mealybug Nymphs and Argentine Ant in attendance.

Dear Joe,
These are not wood boring insects.  They are nymphs of plant parasitic Hemipterans, most probably Mealybugs in the family Pseudococcidae.
  You can use BugGuide for comparison.  It appears that is a vile Argentine Ant in attendance.  The invasive, exotic Argentine Ant will move plant parasitic Hemipterans from plant to plant, and they tend to them and protect them.  We believe the plant was damaged, and the wound provided a food source for the nutrient sucking Mealybugs.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Plagued by bugs!!
Location: Newcastle nsw
January 24, 2015 7:57 am
Hi there,
I live in Newcastle nsw Australia and have been plagued by bugs for the past 6 months. They are irritating my skin and my partners. We get itchy and have open sores all over our bodies, mainly just behind our ears and on the neck, legs, arms, face, back, hands and feet, well everywhere! We had pest control come and exterminate what he believed to be bird mites several types he said, funnily enough he wouldn’t come back again because he was tired and won’t take our calls now . Initially the problem died down but now 2 months later is back full force, it’s not scabies, it’s possibly a million other things but we can’t seem to find any help with this. Tonight I was in the bathroom and this long spindly legged thing appeared from nowhere, I know I have seen it several times around the house but have no idea what it is and if it could be a factor in the skin dilemma.
Signature: Rachel

Unknown Hymenopteran

Possibly Red Spider Ant Alate

Dear Rachel,
We are relatively certain that the pictured insect is not responsible for your skin irritation, and we believe that Mites are most likely the problem.  The pictured insect is a member of the order Hymenoptera which includes wasps and ants.  We are leaning toward it being the alate of an Ant, a winged reproductive individual, though the legs are quite long for a typical ant.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide us with a more definitive identification.  Again, we do not believe this Hymenopteran is related to your skin condition.  This individual does resemble the Red Spider Ants pictured on the Brisbane Insect website.

Unknown Hymenopteran

Possibly Red Spider Ant Alate

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Subject: Species name
Location: Kimberley Sout Africa
November 17, 2014 1:37 am
Hi!
I am trying to make preserved specimens of bugs in our area for a laboratory. It is important to have information of the specimen which will enable the students to learn from these specimens. I was hoping you could help me with the species name of each.
Signature: Odette du Plessis

Red Driver Ant

Red Driver Ant

Dear Odette,
The quality of your images is quite poor, and we do not believe we will be able to give you an accurate species identification on either the Scarab Beetle in the family Scarabaeidae or the Preying Mantis.  Your third insect looks very much like a male Driver Ant or Sausage Fly in the genus
Dorylus.  You can view additional images of Red Driver Ants on the iSpot website.  As an aside, we find it curious that you are mounting your specimens on glass slides like microscope specimens instead of on pins like most insect specimens.

Hi! Thank you for trying to help me identify the species. I am sure your information will steer me in the right direction. They are on glass slides as I intend placing them in glass jars filled with alcohol. I found this recipe for mounting insects. I would have sent it to you just to show you, unfortunately the information is in afrikaans. How do you prevent insects that are mounted with pins from going mouldy and becoming brittle and breaking? Thank you once again for the information. Odette

Hi again Odette,
Insects do dry out when they are mounted on pins.  We do not have a collection, so we are not prepared to relay the necessary steps for mounting insects, but that information should be readily available in books or online.

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Subject: identification of Insects
Location: nort of Mozambique
November 6, 2014 3:35 am
I write to bugman for help.
I’m university student of Biological Sciences, University Lurio. please help me identify the animals / insects that will send.
once identified, served to write my thesis
Signature: Domingos Nandinho Arlindo

Ant

Ant

Dear Domingos,
Congratulations on your university studies where we are presuming you have gotten training in the Biological Sciences on the proper identification of insects.  We are artists with no formal training in the Biological Sciences.  With all due respect, you should be doing your own research in this matter.  The most popular posting on our site, even though there is no image, continues to be What’s That Bug? will not do your child’s homework.

Thank you

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Bulldog Ant

Bulldog Ant

Subject: an insect & an arachnid
Location: melbourne, australia; auckland, new zealand
October 6, 2014 4:22 am
hi folks! you helped me with a bug once before, & i absolutely love your site – hoping you can ID these two critters from my trip to australia & new zealand this month.
the ant is about 5/8″ long & was found on the great ocean road, about 170 miles west of melbourne, australia.
the 1/2″ long spider was found on my neck in auckland, new zealand. :)
the third ant i believe i’ve correctly ID’d as a bulldog ant, but the photo came out so nice that i figured i’d submit it, too.
keep up the great work, you wonderful people.
Signature: lish d

Unknown Australian Ant

Unknown Australian Ant

Dear lish d,
We love your image of a Bulldog Ant.  According to National Geographic Magazine:  “Fearless and belligerent, the inch-long bulldog ant of Australia uses her sharp vision and venomous stinger to track and subdue formidable prey.  Picture a wasp with its wings ripped off, and you’ll have a good approximation of a bulldog ant. The resemblance is no coincidence: Ants are believed to have evolved from wasplike ancestors some 140 million years ago. The bulldog ant has long been considered one of the oldest ant lineages. But some recent studies suggest that bulldogs appeared no earlier than 100 million years ago, along with an explosion of other ant species that may have accompanied the rise of flowering plants. ”  We are unable to identify the creatures in your other two images, and we are posting the unidentified and rather forgetable other Ant which one of our readers may eventually be able to identify.
  We will not be adding the spider image to this posting as they are not categorized together in our archives, they are not from the same country, and we don’t want to speculate if they met one on one.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Ant Alates

Ant Alates

Subject: Is it a wasp??
Location: central Iowa
October 8, 2014 4:25 pm
These bugs are in our garage. They seem to be falling from the roof. About a month ago this happened and they reappeared today. The swarm appeared quickly and once I opened the door they flew out eventually. They look like flies but not quite. We have had a wasp nest it that area in the past. If you can figure something out that would be great! I looked it up and found a cicada killer that looked similar. Thank you!
Signature: Miranda

Hi Miranda,
Mistaking for wasps these flying Ants, which are members of the reproductive caste known as Alates, is understandable since Ants and Wasps are both classified in the order Hymenoptera.  Since you had two swarms appear in your garage, we deduce there is at least one colony living within the footprint of the garage.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination