Currently viewing the category: "Ants"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant?
Location: Pasadena CA
April 6, 2014 10:07 pm
Hello, About a few hours ago I found what looks like an ant in my kitchen. I am writing to you because this possible ant is the biggest one I have ever seen around these parts. Normally We see the tiny black ants & out in lots we see red ants, but like I said, this one is much larger than any I have seen before.
It is about half an inch long, and about a quarter of an inch tall. It is a dark brown, almost black ant with Honey (lighter) colored legs. It has a light rectangle patch on its back (Thorax?). Elbowed antennae. At first I thought maybe termite? but from searching online it did not look like one. As far as location, this insect was found in Pasadena CA in an apartment. Weather is spring (though warm enough to feel like summer). We have only seen the one so far & I have it contained in a specimen box. Please let me know if you need anything else & thanks!
Signature: Jeeb

Ant

Ant

Hi Jeeb,
We don’t recognize your Ant, and since it was found indoors in the spring, we would not eliminate the possibility that this is a queen ant attempting to establish a new colony after loosing her wings subsequent to her nuptial flight.  Because of its large size, we suspect this might be a Carpenter Ant in the genus
Camponotus and you can see some examples on BugGuide.  We hope someone with more knowledge on Ants can provide a definitive identification.

Possibly Carpenter Ant

Possibly Carpenter Ant

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spiny caterpillar
Location: Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica
March 27, 2014 3:26 pm
We came across this large spiny/fleshy caterpillar (being eaten by ants) in the Osa Peninsula in Costa Rica at the end of the dry season (middle of March). It was about 3 inches long. Do you know what it would have become?
Signature: Alison

Ants eat Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar

Ants eat Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar

Hi Alison,
Alas, this caterpillar appears to have already become all that it will become, food for Ants.  Were it not attacked, it should have transformed into one of the Giant Silkmoths in the family Saturniidae and the subfamily Hemileucinae, though we have not had any luck verifying the actual species.  We will contact Bill Oehlke to get his opinion.

Daniel,
Only a guess. Automeris postalbida. Color might be off due to near death.
Please always ask for more precise location before sending images. Saves me
time in looking things up. Different species, often very similar, can often
come from different locations. If I know location I might only have to
search through five files instead of fifty as I have species checklists for
most of South and Central America down to one level below national level..
Thanks for thinking of me.
Bill

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this from Singapore?
Location: Singapore
March 18, 2014 10:19 pm
I’m looking to identify what the pictured bug/insect/bee is. is it harmful?
This was taken today in Singapore (currently 90 degrees, 70 percent humidity with heavy rain the last few days.).Sorry this is the only picture I have!
Signature: Lindsay

Queen Green Ant

Queen Green Tree Ant

Hi Lindsay,
This looks to us like a Queen Green Tree Ant or Queen Green Weaver Ant,
Oecophylla smaragdina, a species found in Australia and Indonesia.  We located some matching images on Green Path.  Your individual will soon lose her wings, and if she mated, she will begin a new colony.  Here is an image on FlickR, and just last week, we posted a photo of a Green Weaver Ant Queen just beginning to lay eggs.

Hey Daniel,
Thanks so much for the prompt reply! Man you guys are quick! :-) thank you.
Cheers,
Lindsay

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Queen Ant!?
Location: Malaysia
March 7, 2014 8:19 am
Dear bugman, I found this green ant on one of my plant’s leaf and it’s beautiful! I’ve never seen a green ant before. What sort of ant is this? How do I take care of it? Can I build like an ant colony out of this?
Signature: Shanon

Green Ant? or something else???

Green Tree Ant

Dear Shanon,
Are you able to provide us with any other images, including some different angles, of this interesting creature.  While it does resemble an Ant, we are not fully convinced that it is an Ant.  It appears to be guarding a clutch of eggs, and we don’t know if an Ant would begin a new colony in this manner.  Until we are able to provide you with a proper identification, we have no advice on raising this insect.  Moments after writing that, we began our research, and we quickly located a posting on a Green Tree Ant,
Oecophylla smaragdina, on the Atlas of Living Australia, where it states:  “commonly called the green tree ant or weaver ant, is a northern species that also occurs throughout South-east Asia and westward to India. They can be conspicuous in forested areas within their range, foraging on vegetation as well as the ground, often in large numbers and forming distinct trails.”  The University of Notre Dame has an online PDF entitled A Study of the Weaver Ant, Oecophylla smaragdina.   Encyclopedia of Life provides this fascinating information attributed to Shuker:  “Another insect tool user is the weaver ant (Oecophylla smaragdina), which makes nests by rolling up leaves and then gluing the sides together with silk. Although it is the adult ants that do this, only the larvae produce silk, so how is the process of leaf gluing achieved? In fact, the adults carry larvae in their jaws and squeeze them gently so that the larvae secrete a drop of silk on one end of the leaf edges. The ants then carry the larvae along the entire length of the leaf edges, squeezing as they go, using the larvae like living bottles of glue, until the edges of the leaves are stuck together from end to end.”  Perhaps this is a queen Green Tree Ant that has shed her wings and is just beginning a new colony.

Dear bugman,
I think you are right! It definitely seem like a weaver ant queen. However I’m unable to capture anymore photos because it is no longer on the leaf of the potted plant. I guess it must have gone off to a bigger tree. Te eggs are still there though. Thank you very much for the reply :)
Sincerely
Shanon

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I love this website.
Location: Ashland, Oregon
February 17, 2014 7:53 am
Hello again, Daniel! I hope this letter finds you well. :) I was just going through some old photos from last summer in Oregon and wanted to share them with you (a wooly moth, ants on a peony flower, and a yellow jacket in my cabin. ) I think I have the last two photos identified correctly, but just wanted to include them because I like the photos. The first one, however, I’m not really sure about. I love this little guy though, in my mind he looks like a sweet little sheep or maybe a strange new Star Wars character.
Signature: Rachel

Ants on Peony Bud

Ants on Peony Bud

Hi Rachel,
We are posting your image of Ants on a peony bud because it brings back such fond childhood memories.  Peonies are extremely long lived plants, and there are some plants in our mother’s garden in Ohio that are rumored to be over 100 years old.  They were brought by family members from Pennsylvania to Ohio, and in about 1960, moved to their current location.  We can recall the sticky buds of the peonies attracting large black ants as well as sweet loving wasps.  We remember being told that if the insects didn’t eat off the sticky covering, the buds would not open.  We wish we were able to identify your Ant species.  We will post your moth image in a unique posting.

Thanks, Daniel! :) Here’s another image of the ants on the peony bud, not for identification purposes, but more so just for the fond memories that it brings to both of us! Enjoy!

Ants on Peony Bud

Ants on Peony Bud

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant from Amazonian Peru
Location: NE Peru
January 23, 2014 4:36 pm
Dear Bugman,
can you tell me what ant species I photographed here? The picture was taken in the Amazon Lowlands of NE Peru. Thank you!
Signature: Frank

Ant

Trap Jaw Ant

Hi Frank,
My those are impressive mandibles.  We found a photo on FlickR that is identified as a Trap Jaw Ant in the genus
 Odontomachus that is a great match for your Ant.  The FlickR posting states:  “Usually difficult to photograph because they are always foraging. They usually rove around with their jaws open and their antennae out ahead of them in sweeping motions. If they run into something that has the right chemical profile then their jaws will snap shut on it in one of the fastest recorded movements in the animal kingdom.”  The Rockefeller University also has a nice photograph. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination