Currently viewing the category: "Ants"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: can you help naming thes bugs?
Location: Central Florida
July 15, 2014 5:26 pm
we own a pool in Florida and these bugs are in the thousands in my pool and I cant identify them I was wondering if you can help me with my problem. I am sending you a picture of them hoping you can tell me what they are. If you can identify them and help me I am very appreciative thanks.
Signature: na

Ants

Ants

Dear na,
If you want an identification, you should try to provide us with a high quality image, not a low resolution, tiny file.  These appear to be Ants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Swarming Dragonflies
Location:  Corralitas Red Car Property, Silver Lake, Los Angeles, California
July 15, 2014 11:03 AM
This morning on our walk of the Corralitas Red Car Property with Diane, we also saw several California Harvester Ant nests, including this very active site.  California Harvester Ants are indicator species which is defined by Encyclopedia Britannica as being an:  “organism—often a microorganism or a plant—that serves as a measure of the environmental conditions that exist in a given locale.”  The disappearance of California Harvester Ants in Los Angeles is directly related to the loss of open space due to overdevelopment, and as the California Harvester Ant is a primary source of food for Horned Lizards, they have also vanished from our local ecosystems.

California Harvester Ant Nest

California Harvester Ant Nest

California Harvester Ant Nest

California Harvester Ant Nest

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

California Harvester Ants harvesting
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
June 24, 2014 5:18 PM
So, two weeks ago, we noticed some California Harvester Ants along a sunny, southwest facing slope, but we did not have a camera.  Today we returned and took some images.  Native Ants like the California Harvester Ants are being displaced by invasive exotic species like the dreaded Argentine Ants.

California Harvester Ant

California Harvester Ant

We were inspired by a recent submission of swarming California Harvester Ants from nearby Red Car Property in Silverlake.

California Harvester Ant

California Harvester Ant harvesting

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: California Harvester Ants
Location: Red Car Property, Silver Lake, Los Angeles
June 23, 2014 1:57 am
Hi Bugman,
I might of happened across some future queens leaving the nest of one of the Harvester Ant colonies on the north end of the Red Car Property in Silver Lake (Los Angeles).
The winged ants were 3 times larger than the small ants ushering them out of the nest. The workers using the main entrance fall somewhere between these two in size.
Unfortunately, while attempting to get a better shot, I cast a shadow over this entrance. The small ants quickly ushered the winged ants back into the nest, while others came out to defend against intruders. Mostly they just ran around posturing, and checking the perimeter, then returned to the nest
more: http://redcarproperty.blogspot.com/2014/06/viaduct-footings-california-harvester.html
I was looking for references to Harvester Ants & was surprised (although I shouldn’t be) that they’ve disappeared from your neighborhood. We’ve got several thriving colonies on the north end of the Red Car Property. The colonies on the vacant lots on my part of the neighborhood have disappeared as the vacant Hillside lots have either been built or used for parking in the past 10 years.
As always, thanks!
Signature: Diane E

Swarming California Harvester Ants

Swarming California Harvester Ants

Hi Diane,
We are positively thrilled to get this marvelous addition to our site, especially since it sheds a bit of light on our failure to follow through with a posting we wanted to make regarding a Mount Washington sighting.  When we moved to Mount Washington in the mid 90s, we would often see California Harvester Ants in the street outside our house as well as on the nearby south facing hillside.  Then we moved to another nearby location in 2000, and we stopped seeing the California Harvester Ants, instead being plagued by the invasive Argentine Ants.  Local entomologist Julian Donahue cannot recall ever seeing California Harvester Ants in Mount Washington, so while walking to a friend’s house the second week in June when we espied a lone Harvester Ant on the sunny south facing slope near our old home, we decided we needed to return with a camera to document the sighting.  Alas, time ran out and it did not get it done, but it is still on the back burner.  Your submission has inspired our crack photographic staff to to head out later today to try to find some worker Harvester Ants in our own neighborhood.  We are happy to hear they are also thriving in nearby Silverlake.

Swarming California Harvester Ants

Swarming California Harvester Ants

Glad to help out – I had no idea you hadn’t seen them in so long.  But it makes sense with all the development over there.  I used to see a lot more 20 years ago all over my hood…

California Harvester Ant habitat on Red Car Property

California Harvester Ant habitat on Red Car Property

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Termite or ant?
Location: Maryland
June 6, 2014 4:25 pm
Literally out of nowhere (I didn’t see them an hour ago), we have hundreds of these. This is only about 1/3 of them. Just as quickly as they came, they went back under the wood porch. Termite or ant?! :( randomally there are also a few red fire ants mixed in without wings.
Signature: Jenn

Swarming Ants

Swarming Ants

Dear Jenn,
These are swarming Ants, and the winged individuals are alates, unmated reproductive individuals that will fly off, mate and begin new colonies.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: queen ants?
Location: grand rapids, mi
May 30, 2014 10:45 pm
The past few days we’ve been seeing these things all over after sundown. They look like carpenter ants but are more than twice the size of the carpenter ants we see during the day. Some have wings, some don’t. They have a ring of fine hairs around their bottoms, a single node, etc. But if they are queens then why are there so many? And why would we only see them at night?
Signature: dave

Carpenter Ant

Carpenter Ant

Hi Dave,
We agree that this is a Carpenter Ant and you can compare your individual to this Alate in the genus
Camponotus that is pictured on BugGuide.  Winged swarming ants are known as alates, and they are produced in quantity by an old colony.  Once a virgin queen mates, she will loose the wings and begin a new colony.  One reason so many are produced by a single colony is that many fall prey to predators, like the image of what appears to be a Cobweb Spider in the family Theridiidae feeding on a winged alate Carpenter Ant.  According to BugGuide:  “Mating flights of the majority of species occur late April-May,” however, the time of day of the flights is not listed.

Carpenter Ant Alate eaten by Spider

Carpenter Ant Alate eaten by Cobweb Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination