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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cannot Google ID this one
Location: Northeasthma Georgia
August 14, 2016 5:43 pm
This guy landed on my windshield. We are in northeast Georgia.
Signature: Mickey

What's That Bug? Immature Leaf Footed Bug

What’s That Bug?
Immature Leaf Footed Bug

Dear Mickey,
We are wonderfully amused with your playful take on our site’s name.  The insect crawling on the window, terrifying the driver of the vehicle is a harmless, immature Leaf Footed Bug, probably in the genus
Acanthocephela.  Here is a matching image on BugGuide for comparison.  Several species in the genus are found in your area.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Nice Cicada-killer wasp with prey
Location: Charlottesville, Virginia, US
August 11, 2016 3:38 pm
I actually have two of these in front of my door — one burrow is beneath a corner of my front walk, the other is apparently under a nearby holly tree. Here’s a pic I got of the former carrying a cicada
Signature: Dave H,

Cicada Killer with Prey

Cicada Killer with Prey

Dear Dave,
You don’t know how refreshing it is for us to receive an image of a Cicada Killer with its prey that we can tag with Food Chain as opposed to tagging it with Unnecessary Carnage since we receive so many images of dead Cicada Killers.  So many people have irrational fears about Cicada Killers, and we concur that they are large and quite formidable looking, but as the host to two underground broods, we would love to have you write back so we can verify to our readership that Cicada Killers are not aggressive toward humans.

A Facebook Comment from Wanda
In all my years of weeding and tending my Rain Garden, I have never – repeat never – been approached or threatened by a Cicada Killer Wasp, even those who were larger than my thumb! I can safely say the same for the other wasps in my garden: Northern Paper, Great Black, Great Golden Digger, Potter and others. They are all more interested in the nectar from the plants, especially the milkweed. I walk past them, they fly past me as I work, they don’t even land on me. I welcome them for the pollinating work they do.

Dave H. confirms Cicada Killer Docility
Subject: Re:  Indeed, Cicada-killers are quite mellow
August 12, 2016 11:42 am
I’ve watched them often as I stood outside smoking,  and they’ve never even made a warning swoop toward me.   Surely one of the biggest wasps most folks will encounter, but also one of the least dangerous.
While I’m at it, I just wanted to compliment that picture of a molting cicada — that one is truly spectacular, and the little girl in the background just underlines the wonder of the moment.
Signature: Dave Harmon

We agree that it is a wonderful image Dave.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cicada
Location: Wv
August 8, 2016 8:19 pm
Periodic
Signature: Brandon

Annual Cicada Metamorphosis

Annual Cicada Metamorphosis

Dear Brandon,
Thanks for sending your awesome image of the metamorphosis of an Annual Cicada.  Annual Cicadas spend several years underground as nymphs, and as they mature, they dig to the surface and molt for the last time, emerging as adult Cicadas.  Annual Cicadas appear every year, which distinguished them from Periodical Cicadas.  Periodical Cicadas in the genus Magicicada spend 17 years underground as nymphs (13 years in southern states) and they emerge in great numbers in a given year.  They are not seen again in that location until the next Brood matures in 17 or 13 years.  Earlier this year, we put out a request for Periodical Cicada images from Brood V, which ranges in the states of Ohio, West Virginia, New York, Virginia, Pennsylvania or Maryland, according to Cicada Mania.  We did not receive an Brood V images.  There are currently 15 active broods being monitored by Cicada Mania, and you can see the predicted emergence schedules on the site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: borer ?
Location: Fredericksburg Va
July 30, 2016 7:29 pm
………….rainy times after hot dry spell
It was inside the house under a table lamp
A cloudy morning
Alive and still
One inch
Fredericksburg , Virginia
If it’s a borer of a tree of some sort…..we have MANY trees and many types>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
July 30th
If it”s a borer…it would be good to know its habitat!
Signature: susan warner

Ivory Marked Beetle

Ivory Marked Beetle

Dear Susan,
This is an Ivory Marked Beetle,
Eburia quadrigeminata, and according to BugGuide:  “hosts include a wide variety of hardwoods (oak, ash, hickory, locust, chestnut, maple, elm, beech, cherry); larvae bore in heartwood.”  According to MoBugs:  “Deciduous woodlands and the nearby area is their favored habitat, but they will often come to lights at night. Females deposit eggs on hardwood trees, usually in the cracks of bark. (Let me clarify here, they will only feed on dead or decaying trees, they will not harm healthy living trees…Thanks Ted for pointing out my oversight).When the larvae hatches it will eat its way into the heartwood of the tree. They feed on the wood pulp. Adults will readily come to fermented molasses bait. In large numbers these beetles could become serious pests to trees, and can cause significant damage. Because of their boring habit, and their capability of reaching the center of even the largest of trees it is not uncommon for these beetles to emerge as much as 10 to 40 years later in wood that was used to make furniture or hardwood flooring.”  We suspect this individual was probably attracted to light or had some other accidental reason for appearing in your home, but we would not rule out the possibility that it might have emerged from some finished wood product or firewood stored indoors.  Since today is the last day of July, and it is time for us to select a new Bug of the Month, we will be featuring your submission.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

For Us, Donald Trump is clumsy and deadly, kind of like a Toe-Biter.  They sound stubborn too.  We can well imagine a predatory, aquatic True Bug being used by a young boy to scare a young girl.  That scenario seems somewhat Trumpian.

Close-Up of a Toe-Biter

If The Donald was a Bug:  Close-Up of a Toe-Biter

Hillary Clinton, on the other hand is much more stealth than she is clumsy, and we would not want to cross her as we imagine her wrath would be unflinching.  Hillary reminds us of a Preying Mantis.  She is deliberate and she is stronger than her mate, who can become a meal, losing his head while copulating, and never losing a beat, so that she would have the energy to raise a brood.  A Preying Mantis can turn its head to look behind it.

If Hillary was a Bug: Mantis Eats Hummer.

If Hillary was a Bug: Mantis Eats Hummer.

For Bernie Sanders, we decided to reference the “Feel the Bern” campaign slogan and we selected the Iron Cross Blister Beetle, which could cause folks to feel the burn if it is carelessly handed.  We found a great image from our archives of an Iron Cross Blister Beetle taking a dip in the swimming pool, but Bernie’s campaign is showing no evidence of cooling off as California’s primary approaches.

Iron Cross Blister Beetle: Feel the Bern

Bernie Sanders:  Cooling Off or still Feeling the Burn???

Origin of this Posting:  May 7, 2016
We thought today while working in the yard how we might anthropomorphize some bugs that remind us of the political candidates, and the first thing that came to mind today for Donald Trump, because of a comment from Roxanne we received, is a Toe-Biter.
  According to Roxanne:  “I have never been bitten. they pinch however, with their big front legs. they are also difficult to remove from clothing, as they are velcro-like. Also difficult to remove from hysterical humans, they have landed on. They are terrible flyers.. bombadiers.”

Comment from a reader
Candidate bugs
June 7, 2016 6:00 am
Loved, loved loved the Candidate comparison. And spot on. Would love to see the rest of the Republican field (pre-primaries).
Signature: Steve

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination