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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Are These?!
Location: Southern California
April 25, 2015 3:52 am
I work at a convenience store, and OVER NIGHT something laid seseme seed-like eggs in all if our employee cups!!
Ive searched the internet looking for answers, but found nothing! Is it dangerous, poisonous? Help us!
Signature: InconvenientEmployee

What's In The Cup???

What’s In The Cup???

Dear Inconvenient Employee,
We are flummoxed by your request.  This is so strange we don’t know where to start.  Were these things found anywhere but inside the cups?  Their rapid appearance and the specificity of their location seems to suggest a disgruntled employee, or perhaps there is a prankster in your midst. 

What Left This???

What Left This???

Sandra Mason Comer, Tim Rogers liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Glowworm Colorado
Location: Grand Junction, Colorado
April 20, 2015 8:20 pm
Hi! I just moved to Grand Junction, CO. We were enjoying a BBQ and noticed our neighbor’s tree is glowing. I am going to head over there tomorrow to see if I can find the cause.
Signature: Kat

Glowing Glowworms or Christmas Tree Lights???

Glowing Glowworms or Christmas Tree Lights???

Dear Kat,
We can’t help but to wonder if recent changes in the status of controlled substances in Colorado have in any way affected your perception of reality and the world around you.  Have you entertained that these might be Christmas Tree lights and not glowing Glowworms?

Sue Dougherty, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Gina Guilinger liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpiller with a nasty sting
Location: Mindo Ecuador
April 3, 2015 5:09 pm
Bugman, check out this beauty found while cutting some brush in Mindo, Ecuador. It left some of its fine hairs behind on the branch it was knocked off of. The local guy I hired to help me told me to watch out for these falling on your head when battling the thicket: a sting from this will put you in the house all day with a fever and intense pain. I didn’t test his claim for myself but I did manage to get these pictures.
Signature: PDB

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Puss Moth Caterpillar

Dear PDB,
This really is a beautiful caterpillar, and it is a wonderful choice to celebrate the 20,000th posting on our site, quite a milestone that fills our tiny staff with immense pride.  At first we thought this must be a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae because of its resemblance to a Monkey Slug from North America, but our search eventually brought up an image of a Puss Moth Caterpillar
(Oruga de Polilla Gato) in the family Megalopyge on FlickR where it states:  “The’hairs’ are very urticant and touching them produces strong reactions that may include hospitalization”.  Puss Moth Caterpillars from North America are also stinging caterpillars that are commonly called Flannel Moth Caterpillars or Asps.  We then tried searching the Monkey Slug genus Phobetron and found an individual from Suriname posted on Flickr, and after careful consideration, we cannot say for certain in which family your caterpillar should be classified, but we are leaning towards the family Megalopyge.  We then found an excellent image by Andreas Kay matching your caterpillar on FlickR, but alas, it is only identified as a Stinging Flannel Moth Caterpillar in the family Megalopygidae.  The best visual match we located was taken by Shirley Sekarajasingham and posted to FlickR, but again, it is only identified to the family level.  Perhaps one of our readers would like to continue searching for a genus or species match for our 20,000th posting.

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Oruga de Polilla Gato

 

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Amy Gosch, Sue Dougherty, Jacob Helton, Kristi E. Lambert liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Star Trek brain eater
Location: Mississippi River, central Louisiana
March 28, 2015 5:14 pm
Don’t go near the water! Found this thing in the Bayou of central Louisiana at the end of March. My research has turned up some similar creepy crawlies but nothing quite the same. What is it?
Signature: Boatswain

Water Tiger and Mosquito Tumbler

Giant Water Scavenger Beetle Larva and Mosquito Tumbler

Dear Boatswain,
We absolutely love your colorful description of what we originally thought was a Water Tiger, the aquatic larva of a Predaceous Diving Beetle in the family Dytiscidae, but once we searched BugGuide and compared your individual to images of larvae of Giant Water Scavenger Beetles in the family Hydrophilidae, we determined that was the correct identification for your creature.  According to BugGuide contributor Andrew Tluczek:  “I have a masters in Entomology and have worked with aquatic insects. It is a Hydrophilidae. The mandibles have ‘teeth’ which Dytiscidae larvae do not have.”  Your individual has “teeth” on the mandibles, and other research turned up additional physical similarities.
  According to the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee Field Station site:  “WSB [Water Scavenger Beetles] larvae are described as ‘sluggish’ and are found crawling on the pond floor or climbing on underwater vegetation. The larvae is a ‘couch-potato’ version of the sleek PDB [Predaceous Diving Beetle] larvae/ water tigers (pictured) (they sometimes share the ‘water tiger’ moniker). WSB larvae often have paired, gill-like structures protruding from the sides of their abdomens. Their feeding category is ‘engulfer-predator;’ they use their hollow jaws to suck out the juices of their prey. Their food-list includes their brethren; they love mosquito larvae but will go after mini-fish and so are an unwelcome addition to a koi pond. Larvae back their abdomen up to the water’s surface and take in air through spiracles (pores) at its tip. They spend a month underwater as larvae and about 12 days pupating in a cell in moist soil.”  That information thrilled us as we can now safely use the term Water Tiger to describe the larvae of aquatic beetles in both families.  According to Bugwood:  “Larvae, which occur in water, have an elongate body and large dark head with prominent curved jaws. Elongated spiracles through which they acquire oxygen arise from the end of the abdomen. … The immature stage is a predator, working by ambush to lie in wait, seizing and crushing prey that comes within reach. Most of their diet is made up of small insects and other aquatic invertebrates. However, their jaws are quite powerful allowing them to consume snails whole as well as catch large prey such as tadpoles and small fish.”  A Mosquito Tumbler, the pupa of a Mosquito, is visible in two of your images.  We have selected your submission as our Bug of the Month for April 2015.

Water Tiger and Mosquito Tumbler (front and center)

Water Tiger and Mosquito Tumbler (front and center)

Water Tiger

Giant Water Scavenger Beetle Larva

Kathy Haines, Katie Pasulka Casas, Jacob Helton, Carmen Thompson, Ellyn Del Corso Campbell, Alisha Bragg, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Migrating Painted Ladies
Location: Elyria Canyon Park, Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
February 14, 2015 10:00 AM
Though we have received many images recently from our readers, we made a decision to select our Bug of the Month for March 2015 from our own images because of the significant seasonal migration of Painted Ladies this year.  According to Julian Donahue, the Painted Ladies are: “particularly active on the wing now, and most appear to be migrating, pausing to nectar on their way farther north.” The Painted Lady,
Vanessa cardui, is a medium sized orange butterfly with a mottled wing pattern and distinctive “eye spots” on the underwings. Painted Ladies were seen taking nectar from the pictured Mule Fat or Baccharis salicifolia, Coastal Bush Sunflower and Manroot. Caterpillars feed on both native and non-native leaves, and the Arroyo Lupine, that is currently blooming, is one native host plant.

Painted Lady

Painted Lady

Painted Lady

Painted Lady

Nadine Gray, Sue Dougherty, Rhiannon Thomas, Alfonso Moreno, Kristi E. Lambert liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination