Currently viewing the category: "Administrative"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what kind of moth is this?
Location: Northwest Illinois
July 14, 2016 8:02 pm
Found this July 7th and July 14, 2016 live in NW IL near a fairly large lake ad wooded area.
Signature: Gary & Diane

Imperial Moth

Imperial Moth

Dear Gary & Diane,
This is our first Imperial Moth,
Eacles imperialis, posting of the year.  According to BugGuide:  “wings yellow, variably spotted and shaded with pinkish, orangish, or purplish-brown; male more heavily marked than female, especially in the south” which makes this a male Imperial Moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Busy milkweeds
Location: Columbus, Ohio
July 12, 2016 1:04 pm
So the milkweeds seem to be the water cooler of the insect world. We have monarchs, Japanese beetles, tons of bees (honey and bumbles), and these red mating things! Their flowers are a pretty color and they really have a pleasant and strong scent. I’m rather surprised that these weren’t grown on purpose before the whole monarch decline. Any way, were enjoying the show and hope to get a caterpillar or two.
Signature: Amber

Mating Large Milkweed Bugs

Mating Large Milkweed Bugs

Dear Amber,
There is indeed quite a robust ecosystem surrounding milkweed, which is one of the reasons we created a Milkweed Meadow tag on our site recently.  Monarch Butterflies need milkweed as it is the only food consumed by the Monarch Caterpillars.  Milkweed Borers and Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillars are other visitors you might expect in the future.  Your mating Large Milkweed Bugs are another species that depends upon milkweed.  Many pollinators like your Bumble Bees, numerous species of butterflies and many wasps including Tarantula Hawks (mostly in western states), while not dependent upon milkweed as a sole food, are attracted to the fragrant blooms that are laden with nectar.  We will attempt to identify your Bumble Bee species.  

Bumble Bees

Bumble Bees

Bumble Bee

Bumble Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  July 7, 2016
Summer is here and we are getting numerous submissions of large Beetles from North America, including the impressive Brownish-Red Stag Beetle

Subject: What is this scary thing?
Location: Northeast PA
July 6, 2016 7:01 pm
Hi, I found this on my porch in Northeast PA. Any ideas on what it is?
Signature: Jennifer

Brownish Red Stag Beetle

Reddish-Brown Stag Beetle

Dear Jennifer,
This is a male Reddish-Brown Stag Beetle,
Lucanus capreolus, and it is the fourth submission of this species we have posted in just over a week.  We suspect it was attracted to your porch light.  According to BugGuide:  “Males use mandibles to fight at breeding sites.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Idk what it is
Location: Womelsdorf pa
June 29, 2016 2:57 pm
This beatles looking about the size of a dime if not a bit bigger has been on our outside light for a few days.
Signature: Connie Wansley

Grapevine Beetle

Grapevine Beetle

Dear Connie,
Also known as a Spotted June Beetle, this Grapevine Beetle,
Pelidnota punctata, is closer to the size of a quarter than a dime.  They are about an inch long.  Since it is the end of the month, we need to select a Bug of the Month for July 2016, and we have decided to feature your submission.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults feed on grape (Vitis) foliage and fruit Larvae host on dead Acer, Celtis, Juglans, Malus, Platanus, Quercus, Ulmus spp [a variety of hardwood trees]” and “Eggs are laid on stumps and rotting logs. Larvae feed on decaying roots and stumps of trees, pupate in adjacent soil. Adults emerge May-September and come to lights.”  According to the University of Wisconsin at Madison:  “Look for GBs east of the Great Plains, in woodlands, thickets, vineyards and gardens – places where rotting wood/stumps are found near grape vines. Adults eat the leaves of grape (wild and domestic) and Virginia creeper (and there’s one account of a GB browsing on spinach in a garden), and the larvae (grubs) feed on rotting wood. Most sources say that the adults do minimal damage in a well-kept vineyard and do not need ‘controlling’.  Ms. GB lays her eggs in stumps and other rotting wood, or on the ground near stumps and rotting wood, apparently favoring dead elm, oak, maple, apple, and hickory. The pale, C-shaped larvae hatch two weeks later, dig/bore in, and feed – and feed, and feed – for the rest of their first year and through their second summer. They eventually reach two inches in length and pupate underground, not surfacing until they emerge as adults the following year.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Update:  June 17, 2016
We’re Back.

Subject:  We’re posting this image of a dead Ten Lined June Beetle being devoured by Argentine Ants and leaving town
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California

June 8, 2016 1:08 AM
Upon leaving the house this afternoon, we moved the garbage to the curb and discovered this dead Ten Lined June Beetle under the recycle bin.  We placed it on the fence so we could take an image upon returning.  Since it was dark, we needed to use the flash.  The beetle is being devoured by invasive Argentine Ants.  This is only the second Ten Lined June Beetle we have found in Mount Washington, and it is just shy of a year ago that we had the first Ten Lined June Beetle visit our office.  This is most likely our last posting prior to taking a week long holiday, during which time we will not be answering any identification requests.  We have postdated numerous submissions to go live during our absence.  We will return in mid-June, so kindly hold your requests until after June 17.

Ten Lined June Beetle devoured by Argentine Ants

Ten Lined June Beetle devoured by Argentine Ants

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

For Us, Donald Trump is clumsy and deadly, kind of like a Toe-Biter.  They sound stubborn too.  We can well imagine a predatory, aquatic True Bug being used by a young boy to scare a young girl.  That scenario seems somewhat Trumpian.

Close-Up of a Toe-Biter

If The Donald was a Bug:  Close-Up of a Toe-Biter

Hillary Clinton, on the other hand is much more stealth than she is clumsy, and we would not want to cross her as we imagine her wrath would be unflinching.  Hillary reminds us of a Preying Mantis.  She is deliberate and she is stronger than her mate, who can become a meal, losing his head while copulating, and never losing a beat, so that she would have the energy to raise a brood.  A Preying Mantis can turn its head to look behind it.

If Hillary was a Bug: Mantis Eats Hummer.

If Hillary was a Bug: Mantis Eats Hummer.

For Bernie Sanders, we decided to reference the “Feel the Bern” campaign slogan and we selected the Iron Cross Blister Beetle, which could cause folks to feel the burn if it is carelessly handed.  We found a great image from our archives of an Iron Cross Blister Beetle taking a dip in the swimming pool, but Bernie’s campaign is showing no evidence of cooling off as California’s primary approaches.

Iron Cross Blister Beetle: Feel the Bern

Bernie Sanders:  Cooling Off or still Feeling the Burn???

Origin of this Posting:  May 7, 2016
We thought today while working in the yard how we might anthropomorphize some bugs that remind us of the political candidates, and the first thing that came to mind today for Donald Trump, because of a comment from Roxanne we received, is a Toe-Biter.
  According to Roxanne:  “I have never been bitten. they pinch however, with their big front legs. they are also difficult to remove from clothing, as they are velcro-like. Also difficult to remove from hysterical humans, they have landed on. They are terrible flyers.. bombadiers.”

Comment from a reader
Candidate bugs
June 7, 2016 6:00 am
Loved, loved loved the Candidate comparison. And spot on. Would love to see the rest of the Republican field (pre-primaries).
Signature: Steve

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination