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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery Fishing Spider
Location: North Plainfield, New Jersey
July 23, 2015 7:53 am
This guy has been hanging out on my pool these past few days. It’s clearly some kind of fishing spider but I can’t figure out what species. From the markings, it doesn’t look quite like any of the more common local species. Any guesses?
Signature: LaSalamander

Grass Spider Walks on Water!!!

Grass Spider Walks on Water!!!

Dear LaSalamander,
Though it is walking on water, this is not a Fishing Spider, which explains why its markings look different.  Among Spiders, walking on water is not miraculous and species other than Fishing Spiders, including Wolf Spiders are able to walk on water because the spread of their legs helps to distribute the weight of the body.  The pronounced spinnerets at the tip of the abdomen are a factor in identifying this as a Grass Spider, possibly
 Agelenopsis pennsylvanica, one of the Funnel Weavers, which is pictured on BugGuide.

Grass Spider

Grass Spider

Thanks so much, Daniel! I wish I had something witty or something more meaningful to say, but that’s all I got. I’m happy to be schooled on the subject of Fishing and Not-So-Fishing Spiders. Hurray!
John

John LaSala, Amelia Gajary, Karin Weidman, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Ann Levitsky, Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Male Black Witch Moth
Location: Frisco, TX
July 19, 2015 5:21 am
I don’t remember if I sent these in before, but I thought your team would appreciate this beauty! A male (I believe) black witch moth landed in my yard one day and allowed me to measure and photograph him. If I didn’t know any better I’d think he was posing!
Signature: Rachel

Male Black Witch

Male Black Witch

Hi Rachel,
We have been receiving numerous Black Witch sighting comments, including some from Colorado.  Your image of this male is wonderful because of the use of scale.  We will feature the posting in the hope it will allow others to identify the Black Witch moths that are currently migrating north from Mexico.

Ann Levitsky, Richard Aston, Jerry Green, Kitty Heidih, Jessica M. Schemm, Mary Sheridan Page Fatzinger, Heather Duggan-Christensen, Moira LeBlanc liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Very hungry caterpillar
Location: Deltaville, VA (Tidewater)
July 16, 2015 8:38 am
At first we thought this caterpillar was a tomato or tobacco hornworm, but it was too spiky. We found it in an open field, mid-morning on a 75* day in July. The property is on the middle peninsula of Virginia. We’re surrounded by brackish water (Chesapeake bay watershed), but there are many farms (mostly corn) in the area.
Signature: Kelli

Hickory Horned Devil

Hickory Horned Devil

Dear Kelli,
Though there is no shortage on our site, we are thrilled to be able to create a new posting of the first Hickory Horned Devil of the year.  Each summer we get numerous identification requests for the largest, and arguably most distinctive looking North American caterpillar.  Despite its fierce appearance, the Hickory Horned Devil is perfectly harmless.  Hickory Horned Devils rarely leave the host trees (hickory, walnut and other trees) where they are feeding on leaves, but this large specimen is getting ready to pupate.  It will seek a location with favorable conditions and it will bury itself before metamorphosing into a naked pupa that will pass the winter with the adult Royal Walnut Moth emerging the following year. 

Hickory Horned Devil

Hickory Horned Devil

Kingson Mendoza Maqui, Rachel Laurelle Owens, Norman Gems, Suzanne Stewart, Joani Tompkins, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Mary Sheridan Page Fatzinger, Heather Duggan-Christensen, Sergio Vicente Naguiat liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  Since we just received these two inquiries that depict the male and the female Eastern Hercules Beetle, Dynastes tityus, we decided to feature a posting that would inform our readers that this magnificent beetle is currently being sited in the eastern portions of North America, so stay vigilant.

Subject: Large Yellow Beetle?
Location: Oxford, MS
June 22, 2015 11:24 am
Found this bug in Oxford, MS (north central) during the middle of the summer. It was outside on my porch. I am very curious because this is one of the biggest bugs I have ever seen. I was also wondering why I would not have seen more of them. I spotted when I was getting out of my car and about 15 yards away. Seems like I would’ve come across more like this unique bug.
Signature: Hotty Toddy

Male Eastern Hercules Beetle

Male Eastern Hercules Beetle

Dear Hotty Toddy,
The male Eastern Hercules Beetle is considered the heaviest North American beetle.

Subject: Beetle I’m Effingham County, Georgia
Location: Effingham County, Georgia
July 3, 2015 4:40 pm
I would appreciate assistance in identifying this beetle found in Effingham County, Georgia. Thank you.
Signature: William R.

Female Eastern Hercules Beetle

Female Eastern Hercules Beetle

Dear William,
We are really excited to get your image of a female Eastern Hercules Beetle because we just posted an image of a horny male Eastern Hercules Beetle.
  We are going to create a new featured posting with both inquiries combined.  You can get better images in the future by keeping the shadow of the cellular telephone out of the shot by slightly moving your body relative to the sun.

Female Eastern Hercules Beetle in the shadow of a cellular telephone.

Female Eastern Hercules Beetle in the shadow of a cellular telephone.

Heather Duggan-Christensen liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  Because our previous posting of Elm Seed Bugs has received so many recent comments, we have decided to make the Elm Seed Bug our Bug of the Month for July 2015 and to post it live a few days early.

Subject: Invaders!
Location: Salt Lake City Utah
June 27, 2015 12:13 pm
We have these little buggers that we seem to keep finding on the back end of our home near the windows. I found a nest of them underneath one of the blinds in our bedroom window. They dont appear to fly. They are about 1/4 inch long. What are they? Do they bite? How can we get rid of them? Thanks in advance…
Signature: -Loyal WTB fan for 5+ years

Elm Seed Bug

Elm Seed Bug

Dear Loyal WTB fan for 5+ years,
It appears that you have an Elm Seed Bug,
Arocatus melanocephalus, infestation, a nonnative species first reported in North America in Idaho in 2012.  As you must know, we do not provide extermination information, though we are sometimes freer when the species is invasive like the Elm Seed Bug.  There are currently numerous comments from readers on the first Elm Seed Bug posting in our archives, and you may find some help there.  According to Gemtek:  “Identification: Elm seed bugs are typically ⅓ inch long and are dark brown in color, with an abdomen that is reddish colored. Like a boxelder bug, their wings fold to form a thin X shape. Aside from color differences, elm seed and boxelder bugs look nearly identical.  Diet, Habitat, Life Cycle, and Habits:  Once again, elm seed bugs are similar to boxelder bugs in all of these aspects. A key difference is that elm seed bugs are primarily found on elm trees. They feed on elm seeds, but will also feed on and live in other types of trees. They are most visible in warmer weather and will create an unpleasant odor if crushed.”  According to BugGuide:  “Invade homes during the summer to escape heat, and then stick around through the winter … One generation per year and adults overwinter. Doesn’t pose a threat to trees, but may show up indoors in huge swarms.”

Elm Seed Bugs invade home.

Elm Seed Bugs invade home.

Sue Dougherty, Ann Levitsky, Heather Duggan-Christensen liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Gentle Readers,
The editorial staff of What’s That Bug? will be on holiday for the next two weeks.  We will not be responding to your numerous identification requests until the end of June, but because we do not want our loyal readership to go through any withdrawals, or to suffer separation anxiety, we have prepared postings to go live to our site daily during our absence.  We anticipate that upon our return, our mailbox will be stuffed with hundreds if not thousands of identification requests, and we are certain we will not be able to respond to more than a tiny fraction.  Meanwhile, please use our search engine to attempt to self identify any sightings that pique your curiosity.  We hope we will get to see Fireflies in Northeast Ohio this June.

Firefly

Firefly

Update:  June 27, 2015
We’re Back, and the Fireflies were spectacular.

Carmen Thompson liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination