Currently viewing the category: "Administrative"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle orgy on goldenrod!
Location: Schenectady, NY
August 27, 2016 11:46 am
Hello WhatsThatBug,
I thought you’d enjoy this shot of no less than four pairs of mating beetles on the same goldenrod plant! There were actually at least two other pairs that I didn’t get in the shot, so clearly this plant is the place for looooove. I think they are Goldenrod Soldier Beetles.
I spotted them at a local park that has a perfect pond for dragonflies. This stand of goldenrod grows alongside a tiny stream that runs through the grass in an open area, and as you can imagine it is a very popular spot for all kinds of insects, including a huge variety of bees and wasps. I’ll need to go back with extra batteries in my camera to see what else I can photograph!
Signature: Susan B.

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

Dear Susan,
Your lurid images of mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles,
Chauliognathus pensylvanicus, are a wonderful addition to our Bug Love tag.  Many years ago we created a Milkweed Meadow tag because there is such a diverse group of insects, including the Monarch Butterfly, that depend upon milkweed for survival, and there are many other insects that are attracted to the nectar rich blossoms.  At that time, we had planned a companion plant community tag called the Goldenrod Meadow because similar to milkweed, goldenrod is also associated with a very diverse insect community.  We are taking the opportunity to launch our Goldenrod Meadow tag with your wonderful submission, and now we will have to go back through our archives to tag appropriate postings from the past.  When you return to the goldenrod patch with extra batteries, please send us any images that you feel will be of interest to our readership. 

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cicada
Location: Wv
August 8, 2016 8:19 pm
Periodic
Signature: Brandon

Annual Cicada Metamorphosis

Annual Cicada Metamorphosis

Dear Brandon,
Thanks for sending your awesome image of the metamorphosis of an Annual Cicada.  Annual Cicadas spend several years underground as nymphs, and as they mature, they dig to the surface and molt for the last time, emerging as adult Cicadas.  Annual Cicadas appear every year, which distinguished them from Periodical Cicadas.  Periodical Cicadas in the genus Magicicada spend 17 years underground as nymphs (13 years in southern states) and they emerge in great numbers in a given year.  They are not seen again in that location until the next Brood matures in 17 or 13 years.  Earlier this year, we put out a request for Periodical Cicada images from Brood V, which ranges in the states of Ohio, West Virginia, New York, Virginia, Pennsylvania or Maryland, according to Cicada Mania.  We did not receive an Brood V images.  There are currently 15 active broods being monitored by Cicada Mania, and you can see the predicted emergence schedules on the site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: borer ?
Location: Fredericksburg Va
July 30, 2016 7:29 pm
………….rainy times after hot dry spell
It was inside the house under a table lamp
A cloudy morning
Alive and still
One inch
Fredericksburg , Virginia
If it’s a borer of a tree of some sort…..we have MANY trees and many types>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
July 30th
If it”s a borer…it would be good to know its habitat!
Signature: susan warner

Ivory Marked Beetle

Ivory Marked Beetle

Dear Susan,
This is an Ivory Marked Beetle,
Eburia quadrigeminata, and according to BugGuide:  “hosts include a wide variety of hardwoods (oak, ash, hickory, locust, chestnut, maple, elm, beech, cherry); larvae bore in heartwood.”  According to MoBugs:  “Deciduous woodlands and the nearby area is their favored habitat, but they will often come to lights at night. Females deposit eggs on hardwood trees, usually in the cracks of bark. (Let me clarify here, they will only feed on dead or decaying trees, they will not harm healthy living trees…Thanks Ted for pointing out my oversight).When the larvae hatches it will eat its way into the heartwood of the tree. They feed on the wood pulp. Adults will readily come to fermented molasses bait. In large numbers these beetles could become serious pests to trees, and can cause significant damage. Because of their boring habit, and their capability of reaching the center of even the largest of trees it is not uncommon for these beetles to emerge as much as 10 to 40 years later in wood that was used to make furniture or hardwood flooring.”  We suspect this individual was probably attracted to light or had some other accidental reason for appearing in your home, but we would not rule out the possibility that it might have emerged from some finished wood product or firewood stored indoors.  Since today is the last day of July, and it is time for us to select a new Bug of the Month, we will be featuring your submission.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Update:  June 17, 2016
We’re Back.

Subject:  We’re posting this image of a dead Ten Lined June Beetle being devoured by Argentine Ants and leaving town
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California

June 8, 2016 1:08 AM
Upon leaving the house this afternoon, we moved the garbage to the curb and discovered this dead Ten Lined June Beetle under the recycle bin.  We placed it on the fence so we could take an image upon returning.  Since it was dark, we needed to use the flash.  The beetle is being devoured by invasive Argentine Ants.  This is only the second Ten Lined June Beetle we have found in Mount Washington, and it is just shy of a year ago that we had the first Ten Lined June Beetle visit our office.  This is most likely our last posting prior to taking a week long holiday, during which time we will not be answering any identification requests.  We have postdated numerous submissions to go live during our absence.  We will return in mid-June, so kindly hold your requests until after June 17.

Ten Lined June Beetle devoured by Argentine Ants

Ten Lined June Beetle devoured by Argentine Ants

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

For Us, Donald Trump is clumsy and deadly, kind of like a Toe-Biter.  They sound stubborn too.  We can well imagine a predatory, aquatic True Bug being used by a young boy to scare a young girl.  That scenario seems somewhat Trumpian.

Close-Up of a Toe-Biter

If The Donald was a Bug:  Close-Up of a Toe-Biter

Hillary Clinton, on the other hand is much more stealth than she is clumsy, and we would not want to cross her as we imagine her wrath would be unflinching.  Hillary reminds us of a Preying Mantis.  She is deliberate and she is stronger than her mate, who can become a meal, losing his head while copulating, and never losing a beat, so that she would have the energy to raise a brood.  A Preying Mantis can turn its head to look behind it.

If Hillary was a Bug: Mantis Eats Hummer.

If Hillary was a Bug: Mantis Eats Hummer.

For Bernie Sanders, we decided to reference the “Feel the Bern” campaign slogan and we selected the Iron Cross Blister Beetle, which could cause folks to feel the burn if it is carelessly handed.  We found a great image from our archives of an Iron Cross Blister Beetle taking a dip in the swimming pool, but Bernie’s campaign is showing no evidence of cooling off as California’s primary approaches.

Iron Cross Blister Beetle: Feel the Bern

Bernie Sanders:  Cooling Off or still Feeling the Burn???

Origin of this Posting:  May 7, 2016
We thought today while working in the yard how we might anthropomorphize some bugs that remind us of the political candidates, and the first thing that came to mind today for Donald Trump, because of a comment from Roxanne we received, is a Toe-Biter.
  According to Roxanne:  “I have never been bitten. they pinch however, with their big front legs. they are also difficult to remove from clothing, as they are velcro-like. Also difficult to remove from hysterical humans, they have landed on. They are terrible flyers.. bombadiers.”

Comment from a reader
Candidate bugs
June 7, 2016 6:00 am
Loved, loved loved the Candidate comparison. And spot on. Would love to see the rest of the Republican field (pre-primaries).
Signature: Steve

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Comment:  After reading the first three comments that arrived, we decided to upgrade this posting to the Nasty Reader tag.

Subject: Comments, Responses, & Sad Backpedaling
January 24, 2016 4:35 am
Hello,
I am a biologist and I work for the Government. I mention this only to reveal my familiarity with reading disturbing and mysterious things. I have been on your site several times hoping to see something interesting. Tonight I did, though not topically expected.  Areas now perfectly clear are:
1)  Nothing here of more knowledge or with  more information than a public high school text book.
2) That you care.
3)You attempt to deflect this by mockery and  wildly unwarranted superiority.
4) That this site does more than babysit its curator’s undernourished egos.
On reading a post , a  schoolyard comment  from another reader, your curiously condescending and marginalizing reply, the rebuke  .. and wait for it…the transparent cowardice of your denial. Perhaps you overlooked a small detail. Tiny detail really..its just that you  typed words on the page.   Hands in pockets and  think  words really, really hard next time? Just a thought.
It’s not too late for this to morph into a catalyst for positive change. Love yourself a little more and understand that cruelty is a game played in shallow water.  Ultimately you will lose. The rest of us can clearly see your feet.
Peace.
Out.
Signature: Amanda

Dear Amanda,
We do consider this website and our life both to be works in progress and we like to think that we have evolved considerably since we first began writing What’s That Bug? in 1998.  From the very beginning, we have maintained that we have no credentials to provide scientific information and we have always strived for our site to be a pop culture site that is accessible to the average person rather than to be a true scientific endeavor targeting intellectual specialists.  That there is “nothing here of more knowledge or with more information than a public high school text book” is not a problem in our mind because there is no requirement that the web browsing public possesses a college degree.  Many children visit our site and a high school text book would be quite educational.  Out of concern for younger readers, we try our best to keep a clean site, so we do not use vulgar language. 

We always defer to true experts, so we question your allegations of our “wildly unwarranted superiority.”  With that stated, your comment has us a bit confused.  There is some praise there, but it is overshadowed by your criticism of our editorial stance.  We are well aware that once content enters cyberspace, it gains a life of its own and it is nearly impossible to rescind, so we actually do carefully consider our words prior to hitting the publish button.  We are not infallible and we do not apologize for our ego.  It can be argued that anyone who enters public life in any way, be it running a blog or running for public office, has an inflated ego. 

Your comment seems to refer to a specific posting with “a schoolyard comment from another reader” and our “transparent cowardice” and what you perceive as “cruelty” on our part, but without a real citation to correspond to your criticism on how we have chosen to run our own public site, we can neither justify our stance nor clarify or defend the meaning of what we have written.  Clearly your background in biology and your position as a government employee has prepared to to analyze our psyche.  In our opinion, your focus on our use of occasional sarcasm vastly overshadows the public service we provide free of charge.

Elise from Facebook Comments.
January 24 at 6:21pm
Love your page, and appreciate that you tried to interpret that sometimes incoherent comment. The poster seems to lack both a sense of humor and a mastery of basic sentence structure. Keep doing what you do.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination