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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee or Fly?
Location: Andover, New Jersey
April 19, 2014 9:10 am
I found several of these little guys sucking up nectar on some hyacinths this morning. Haven’t seen these before and am thinking that it is some sort of mimic fly? Hoping you can help.
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Greater Bee Fly

Greater Bee Fly

Hi Deborah,
These are amazingly detailed images of a Greater Bee Fly,
Bombylius major, a species that if found in Europe as well as North America.  As you have surmised, this is a fly that mimics a bee, and it is a pollinating species.  Greater Bee Flies generally make their appearance early in the spring.

Greater Bee Fly

Greater Bee Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pig moth??
Location: South Africa
April 17, 2014 6:38 am
Dear bugman
Please can you identify this moth? We are currently in fall in SA.
Thank you
Signature: minette

"Pig Moth" from South Africa

“Pig Moth” from South Africa is Lappet Moth

Dear Minette,
We don’t know what species of moth you have submitted and time will not permit our ability to research its identity at this time, but we are content dubbing it a “Pig Moth” and taking the time to format your images and request to post live.  We will enlist our readership to research this fascinating looking moth until completing our obligations allows us to return to the office to resume research.

"Pig Moth" from South Africa

“Pig Moth” from South Africa is Lappet Moth

Update:  April 19, 2014
We are relatively certain this “Pig Moth” is in the superfamily Noctuiodae, but we are still trying to establish its identity.

Update:  Comment
I took the original photos of the “pig moth” in Masvingo Zimbabwe. It has now ben identified as being Lasiocampidae: stoermeriana sp. by Johan Heyns and Roy Goff from the South African Butterflies Bugs Bees and other small animals on Facebook. A very pretty, unusual looking little moth 25 mm long.

Ed. Note:  See African Moths for an image of a living specimen from the genus and this other example from African Moths.  Armed with a family, we actually think it looks more like this Streblote aculeata that is pictured on ISpot, though that might be a misidentification.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Small beetle, windowsill & baseboards
Location: Vancouver Island, BC – southern tip.
April 13, 2014 11:12 am
Hi,
I have been finding these little beetles on my windowsill in my atrium (18′ ceilings) and along the baseboards in that atrium. There is no carpet – it’ s laminate flooring. The house is only 7 years old. The atrium is our ‘dining room’ which is only used for dinner in the evenings and kept clean.
Can you please advise what the bug is – I’m assuming it’s some sort of beetle.
Signature: Thanks, Tammy

Varied Carpet Beetles

Varied Carpet Beetles

Hi Tammy,
You have Varied Carpet Beetles,
Anthrenus verbasci , currently our most common identification request with an average of five requests arriving daily.  Varied Carpet Beetles are members of the family Dermestidae, a group that contains many members that are cosmopolitan and that infest homes.  The adults, which you are finding, feed on pollen, and they are likely congregating on the window sills in an attempt to gain access to the outdoors.  The larvae are the pests that infest homes.  According to BugGuide, they are “primarily a household pest on plant (dried fruits/nuts) and animal materials; regularly encountered in dried-milk factories, occasionally in flour mills and warehouses” and they eat a “wide variety of materials of animal origin (wool, fur, skins…)(1); stored food materials and products (biscuits, cakes, seeds, wheat, maize, oats, rice, cayenne pepper, cacao, and dried cheese)”.  They are reviled in museums and BugGuide also notes they are: “arguably, world’s most important pest of insect collections.”  The best way to eliminate them from the home, in fact the only way to eliminate them from the home, is to identify the source of the infestation, the place where the larvae are feeding, and discard any food or other item that might be feeding the larvae. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: large moth
Location: southern nevada
March 31, 2014 7:07 am
the last few months these big moths have been everywhere and my little brother is dying to know what they are. i’d say it’s bigger than a quarter at least
Signature: curious

Whitelined Sphinx

Whitelined Sphinx

Dear curious,
We have been getting in increasing number of requests to identify Whitelined Sphinxes, the moth species in your image, and we have decided to make your submission the Bug of the Month for April 2014.  We suspect there might be a significant annual Whitelined Sphinx population this spring, and we also got a Wanted Poster from University of Entomology PhD candidate Cristina Francois to report significant sightings of masses of Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillars.  During favorable years, the Caterpillars, which can be eaten, are found in great numbers.  We are currently observing Whitelined Sphinx Moths very regularly as they are attracted to the porch light.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hi Daniel,
A Ph.D. candidate at the University of Arizona is seeking information on White-lined Sphinx Moth larvae, especially large aggregations of them.
I have posted her “Wanted!” poster on the LepSoc Facebook page, and I told her I’d also send them to you (PDF and JPEG formats, attached) to be considered for sharing on What’s That Bug?
Julian P. Donahue
WANTED!

WANTED

WANTED

Hi Julian,
We are unable to post large files to What’s That Bug? so we included a link to the large pdf and a smaller version as a visual.

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

January 14, 2014
We will be away from the office for a few days.  We have postdated some letters and photos so that there will be daily updates to our site, however, we will not be responding to any letters until we return.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination