19 Black Beetles With Markings

In this article, we look at several black beetles that have distinctive markings.

Beetles are a diverse group of insects, with many species varying in size, shape, and color.

The black beetles we discuss here are known for their unique patterns and the specific roles they play in nature, such as pollinators, predators of pests, or recyclers of nutrients.

We will look at their classification, appearance, life stages, what they eat, and how they behave.

Some of these beetles are helpful to humans by controlling pest populations, while others can be harmful to crops and materials.

By learning about these beetles, we can understand their importance in the ecosystem and how to manage their impact on our environment.

19 Black Beetles with Markings You May Find in Your Garden!

Longhorned Borer (Xestoleptura crassicornis)

Classification:

  • Domain: Eukaryota
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Infraorder: Cucujiformia
  • Family: Cerambycidae
  • Genus: Xestoleptura
  • Species: X. crassicornis

The Longhorned Borer, Xestoleptura crassicornis, is a species of flower longhorn beetle that belongs to the Cerambycidae family.

It is native to North America and is part of a group known for their long antennae, which often exceed the length of their bodies.

Physical Appearance:

The Xestoleptura crassicornis has an elongated body with black color and brown markings. Its most distinguishing feature is its long antennae.

Lifecycle:

The lifecycle of longhorn beetles generally includes four stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult.

The larvae are wood-borers, which means they spend a significant part of their life inside the wood of trees, where they feed and grow until they pupate and emerge as adults.

Black Beetles With Markings

Diet:

As a member of the flower longhorn beetle group, Xestoleptura crassicornis adults feed on pollen and nectar from flowers.

The larvae, on the other hand, would feed on the wood of trees.

Behavior:

Flower longhorn beetles are typically found on or near flowers during the adult stage of their life.

They are known to be important pollinators due to their diet of nectar and pollen.

Pest Status and Control:

Longhorn beetles can cause damage to trees, especially during the larval stage.

Control methods for wood-boring beetles in general may include monitoring and removing infested wood to prevent the spread of the beetles to healthy trees.

Southwestern Eyed Click Beetle (Alaus lusciosus)

Classification:

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Family: Elateridae

Physical Appearance:

The Southwestern Eyed Click Beetle is known for its distinctive “eyespots” on its pronotum, which are large, black, and ringed with white.

These are not true eyes but are believed to be used to scare off predators. The beetle itself is elongated, has a robust body, and is generally black in color.

Lifecycle:

Like other click beetles, the Southwestern Eyed Click Beetle undergoes complete metamorphosis with four life stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult.

The larvae, known as wireworms, live in the soil and feed on other insects. Adults are known for their clicking mechanism, that helps them flip into the air to escape predators.

Eyed Elater

Diet:

The larvae are predatory and will feed on other soil-dwelling insects.

Adult beetles are generally saprophagous, feeding on decaying plant matter, but they can also consume nectar and pollen.

Behavior:

This beetle is famous for its defense mechanism of creating a clicking sound to startle predators.

When threatened, it can snap a spine on its prosternum into a corresponding notch on its mesosternum, producing a violent jerk that flips the beetle into the air and often right onto its feet.

Pest Status and Control:

The Southwestern Eyed Click Beetle is not typically considered a pest and does not require control measures.

Black and Red Blister Beetle (Megetra cancellata)

Classification:

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Family: Meloidae

Physical Appearance:

The Black and Red Blister Beetle has a striking appearance with its bright red head and pronotum, and contrasting black elytra with fine ridges.

They are medium-sized beetles with soft bodies.

Lifecycle:

Blister beetles exhibit complete metamorphosis. The larvae are parasitic, initially feeding on grasshopper eggs and then moving on to bees’ nests.

Adults are typically seen in the spring and summer.

Source: SigaCC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Diet:

Adults feed on foliage and are often found on flowers, where they consume petals, pollen, and nectar.

Behavior:

Blister beetles are so named because they secrete a substance called cantharidin, which can cause blistering on human skin.

They are relatively slow-moving and are often found in mating pairs.

Pest Status and Control:

Blister beetles can be pests in gardens and fields, particularly because they feed on a wide range of plants and can occur in large numbers.

Control methods include manual removal and the use of protective netting to prevent them from reaching plants.

Chemical control is rarely recommended due to their beneficial role in controlling grasshopper populations.

Pigweed Flea Beetle (Disonycha glabrata)

Classification:

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Family: Chrysomelidae

Physical Appearance:

Pigweed Flea Beetles are small, shiny, and black with a bluish or greenish sheen. They have large hind legs adapted for jumping, similar to fleas.

Lifecycle:

They have a complete lifecycle with egg, larval, pupal, and adult stages. The larvae feed on the roots and leaves of host plants, while adults can be found on the foliage.

Source: Judy GallagherCC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Diet:

Both larvae and adults feed on pigweed (Amaranthus spp.) and related plants, which can include crops like spinach, beets, and potatoes.

Behavior:

Pigweed Flea Beetles are known for their jumping ability.

Adults are most active during warm, sunny weather and can cause significant damage to foliage by chewing small, round holes in the leaves.

Pest Status and Control:

They are considered pests in agricultural settings, particularly where pigweed is present. 

Control methods include crop rotation, the use of cover crops, and the removal of weeds. 

Insecticides may be used, but they should be applied with caution to avoid harming beneficial insects and to prevent resistance.

Cucumber Beetles (Diabrotica undecimpunctata, Acalymma vittatum)

Classification:

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Family: Chrysomelidae

Physical Appearance:

Cucumber beetles are small, oval-shaped insects.

The spotted cucumber beetle (Diabrotica undecimpunctata) is yellow-green with twelve black spots on its wing covers, while the striped cucumber beetle (Acalymma vittatum) is yellow with three black stripes down its back.

Lifecycle:

They have a complete lifecycle with distinct egg, larval, pupal, and adult stages. The larvae are worm-like and live in the soil, feeding on roots and underground stems.

Source: R.L. Croissant, Bugwood.orgCC BY 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Diet:

Both larvae and adults feed on cucurbit plants, such as cucumber, squash, pumpkin, and melons. Adults can also feed on the leaves and flowers of these plants.

Behavior:

Cucumber beetles are known for their rapid flight and are most active on warm, sunny days.

They can cause significant damage to young plants and are also vectors for bacterial wilt and squash mosaic virus.

Pest Status and Control:

Cucumber beetles are significant pests in gardens and farms.

Control methods include using row covers to protect young plants, planting resistant varieties, using traps, and applying insecticides when necessary.

Crop rotation and timely planting can also help reduce beetle populations.

Larder Beetle (Dermestes lardarius)

Classification:

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Family: Dermestidae

Physical Appearance:

Larder beetles are oval and approximately 7-9 mm in length.

They are dark brown to black with a distinctive cream-colored, banded area across the elytra with six dark spots within the band.

Lifecycle:

Larder beetles undergo complete metamorphosis. The larvae are hairy and elongated, with two spines on the tail end.

They can be found in areas where there is a high protein food source.

Larder Beetle

Diet:

They feed on dry animal products such as ham, cheese, and dry pet food, as well as dead insects and animals.

Behavior:

Larder beetles are typically found in food storage areas, museums, and places where animal products or specimens are kept.

They can cause damage to household items and specimens.

Pest Status and Control:

As pests, larder beetles can damage food and other materials.

Control involves cleaning and removing the infested material, proper storage of food products, and, if necessary, the use of insecticides.

Eastern Eyed Click Beetle (Alaus oculatus)

Classification:

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Family: Elateridae

Physical Appearance:

The Eastern Eyed Click Beetle is notable for its large, false eye spots on the pronotum, which are ringed with white and are used to startle predators.

The body is black and elongated, with a somewhat flattened appearance.

Lifecycle:

This beetle also undergoes complete metamorphosis. The larvae, known as wireworms, are predatory and live in the soil.

The adults are known for their clicking mechanism, which they use to right themselves if turned over.

Source: HenryhartleyCC BY 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Diet:

The larvae feed on other insects, while the adults are believed to feed on nectar and plant juices.

Behavior:

The Eastern Eyed Click Beetle is known for its ability to leap into the air with a loud click when it needs to escape from danger.

This behavior is a defense mechanism against predators.

Pest Status and Control:

The Eastern Eyed Click Beetle is not considered a pest and does not typically require control. They are often welcomed in gardens as the larvae help control pest populations.

Black Caterpillar Hunter Beetle (Calosoma sayi)

Classification:

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Family: Carabidae

Physical Appearance:

The Black Caterpillar Hunter, as its name suggests, is predominantly black with a metallic sheen.

It has a robust, elongated body and is a part of the ground beetle family. Its strong mandibles are well-adapted for hunting.

Lifecycle:

This beetle undergoes complete metamorphosis with egg, larval, pupal, and adult stages. The larvae are also predators and are known for their voracious appetite for caterpillars.

Caterpillar Hunter

Diet:

True to its name, the Black Caterpillar Hunter preys on caterpillars and other soft-bodied insects, both in its larval and adult stages.

Behavior:

These beetles are nocturnal and are often found on the ground under leaf litter or within the foliage where caterpillars are present. They are fast and agile hunters.

Pest Status and Control:

The Black Caterpillar Hunter is beneficial in controlling pest caterpillar populations and is considered an ally in gardens and agricultural fields.

No control measures are needed for these beetles.

Punctured Tiger Beetle (Cicindela punctulata)

Classification:

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Family: Carabidae
  • Subfamily: Cicindelinae

Physical Appearance:

The Punctured Tiger Beetle is a small to medium-sized beetle with a slender, elongated body.

It is typically dull brown to olive green with small, round pits or punctures on its elytra, giving it its name.

Lifecycle:

Tiger beetles are known for their complete metamorphosis. The larvae live in vertical burrows and ambush passing prey.

Source: Judy GallagherCC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Diet:

Both larvae and adults are predators, feeding on a variety of insects. Adults are fast runners and can also fly, catching prey on the ground or in vegetation.

Behavior:

Punctured Tiger Beetles are active predators known for their speed and agility. They are often found in sandy areas, along paths, or in open fields where they hunt for prey.

Pest Status and Control:

Tiger beetles, including the Punctured Tiger Beetle, are beneficial predators and are not considered pests.

They help control insect populations and do not require pest control measures.

Twice-Stabbed Ladybug (Chilocorus stigma)

Classification:

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Family: Coccinellidae

Physical Appearance:

The Twice-Stabbed Ladybug is small and dome-shaped with a shiny black body and two prominent red spots on its wing covers, which resemble stab wounds, hence the name.

Lifecycle:

This ladybug undergoes complete metamorphosis. The larvae are alligator-like and feed voraciously on their prey, particularly scale insects.

Diet:

They are predators, primarily feeding on scale insects and aphids, both in their larval and adult stages.

Behavior:

Twice-Stabbed Ladybugs are often found in trees, shrubs, and other plants where their prey is abundant. They are beneficial insects, helping to control populations of plant pests.

Pest Status and Control:

As beneficial predators, Twice-Stabbed Ladybugs are important in natural pest control and are often introduced as a biological control agent.

They do not require control themselves.

Common Eastern Firefly (Photinus pyralis)

Classification:

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Family: Lampyridae

Physical Appearance:

The Common Eastern Firefly is known for its light-producing abdomen, which is used for communication during mating.

They have soft bodies and are typically brown with yellow and black coloring.

Lifecycle:

Fireflies have a complete lifecycle. The larvae are known as glowworms and are found in the ground or in rotting wood, where they prey on other invertebrates.

Diet:

Larvae are predatory, while adults may not feed at all. If they do, they consume nectar and pollen.

Behavior:

These fireflies are best known for their bioluminescent evening displays in the summer. The flashing patterns are unique to each species and are used to attract mates.

Pest Status and Control:

Fireflies are not considered pests and are actually beneficial for the environment.

They do not damage crops or gardens and are enjoyed for their light displays. No control measures are necessary.

Oriental Beetle (Exomala orientalis)

Classification:

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Family: Scarabaeidae

Physical Appearance:

The Oriental Beetle is a member of the scarab family, with an oval-shaped body that ranges in color from mottled gray to brown and can have various patterns.

They are relatively small, typically measuring between 7 to 11 mm in length.

Lifecycle:

The Oriental Beetle has a complete life cycle, including egg, larva, pupa, and adult stages. The larvae, known as grubs, live in the soil and feed on the roots of grasses and other plants.

Oriental Beetle

Diet:

Larvae feed on the roots of turfgrass and ornamental plants, while adults feed on the foliage and flowers of various plants, including roses and other ornamentals.

Behavior:

Adult Oriental Beetles are active at dusk and are attracted to lights. They are often found in lawns, gardens, and agricultural areas.

Pest Status and Control:

Oriental Beetles are considered pests, especially in their larval stage, because they can cause significant damage to turfgrass and ornamental plants.

Control methods include the use of parasitic nematodes, milky spore disease, and chemical insecticides to target the grubs in the soil.

White-spotted Sawyer Beetle (Monochamus scutellatus)

Classification:

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Family: Cerambycidae

Physical Appearance:

The White-spotted Sawyer Beetle is a large, long-bodied beetle, typically black or brown with white spots or markings.

The most distinctive feature is the long antennae, which can be up to twice the body length in males.

Lifecycle:

This beetle also undergoes complete metamorphosis.

The larvae are wood-borers, living inside the wood of coniferous trees, and are known for the sawdust-like frass they expel from their tunnels.

Source: D. Gordon E. RobertsonCC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Diet:

The larvae feed on the wood of various coniferous trees, while adults feed on the bark and foliage.

Behavior:

White-spotted Sawyer Beetles are often found in forests, particularly in recently dead or dying trees.

They are known for their “sawing” sound as the larvae bore through wood.

Pest Status and Control:

They can be considered pests in lumber production and forestry due to the damage they cause to trees.

Control is difficult once the larvae are inside the tree, but removing and destroying infested wood can help prevent the spread.

Bronzed Tiger Beetle (Cicindela repanda)

Classification:

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Family: Carabidae
  • Subfamily: Cicindelinae

Physical Appearance:

The Bronzed Tiger Beetle is a small, agile beetle with a characteristic metallic bronze or greenish sheen on its elytra.

They have long legs and large mandibles, typical of tiger beetles.

Lifecycle:

Like other tiger beetles, the Bronzed Tiger Beetle undergoes complete metamorphosis. The larvae live in small burrows in the ground where they wait to ambush prey.

Source: Judy GallagherCC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Diet:

Both larvae and adults are predatory, feeding on a variety of insects. They are fast runners and are capable of flying, catching prey on the ground or in vegetation.

Behavior:

Bronzed Tiger Beetles are active predators and are commonly found along sandy riverbanks, lakeshores, and other open, sandy areas where they hunt for prey.

Pest Status and Control:

Tiger beetles, including the Bronzed Tiger Beetle, are beneficial predators and are not considered pests.

They help control insect populations and do not require pest control measures.

Diabolical Ironclad Beetle (Phloeodes diabolicus)

Classification:

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Family: Zopheridae

Physical Appearance:

The Diabolical Ironclad Beetle has a distinctive robust exoskeleton that is incredibly tough and resistant to pressure and damage.

It has a dull black or dark brown coloration and an oval, flattened body shape.

Lifecycle:

This beetle has a complete life cycle with egg, larval, pupal, and adult stages. The larvae develop within decaying wood, and the life cycle can take several years to complete.

Diabolical Ironclad Beetle

Diet:

Both larvae and adults feed on fungi growing on dead or decaying wood, and they play a role in the decomposition process.

Behavior:

The Diabolical Ironclad Beetle is known for its ability to withstand extreme force without injury, a trait that has attracted scientific interest for applications in materials science.

They are not fast movers and rely on their tough exoskeleton for protection rather than flight or speed.

Pest Status and Control:

This beetle is not considered a pest and does not require control measures. It is often left alone due to its non-destructive behavior and the difficulty of physically damaging it.

Sculptured Pine Borer (Chalcophora virginiensis)

Classification:

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Family: Buprestidae

Physical Appearance:

The Sculptured Pine Borer is a large, metallic wood-boring beetle. It has a sculptured appearance with grooves and pits on its hard elytra, which are typically a coppery or bronzy color.

Lifecycle:

The life cycle includes egg, larva, pupa, and adult stages. The larvae bore into pine trees, where they can live for several years before emerging as adults.

Northeastern Sculptured Pine Borer

Diet:

Larvae feed on the wood of pine trees, while adults are believed to feed on plant fluids and sometimes foliage.

Behavior:

These beetles are strong fliers and are attracted to stressed or dying pine trees where they lay their eggs.

The larvae create tunnels in the wood, which can weaken the structural integrity of the tree.

Pest Status and Control:

Sculptured Pine Borers can be considered pests in forestry and to homeowners with pine trees.

Control methods include maintaining tree health to resist infestation and removing infested trees to prevent the spread.

Tomentose Burying Beetle (Nicrophorus tomentosus)

Classification:

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Family: Silphidae

Physical Appearance:

The Tomentose Burying Beetle is easily recognizable by its black body with bright orange-red markings.

It has a distinctive, dense, hair-like covering on its pronotum, which gives it a “tomentose” or fuzzy appearance.

Lifecycle:

This beetle is known for its unusual reproductive behavior, which includes burying small carcasses to provide a food source for their larvae.

They have a complete life cycle with egg, larval, pupal, and adult stages.

Tomentose Burying Beetle

Diet:

Adults are carrion feeders, and they prepare and preserve a carcass to feed their offspring. The larvae feed on the carcass provided by the adults.

Behavior:

Tomentose Burying Beetles are nocturnal and have a well-developed sense of smell to locate carcasses, which they then bury and use as a food source for their larvae.

Pest Status and Control:

These beetles are not considered pests and are actually beneficial as they help recycle nutrients back into the ecosystem. No control measures are necessary.

Oblique-Lined Tiger Beetle (Cicindela tranquebarica)

Classification:

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Family: Carabidae
  • Subfamily: Cicindelinae

Physical Appearance:

The Oblique-Lined Tiger Beetle is a slender, fast-moving beetle with a dark, metallic green or brown body and distinctive white or yellowish oblique lines on the elytra.

Lifecycle:

This species undergoes complete metamorphosis. The larvae live in burrows and ambush prey that passes by.

Source: Judy GallagherCC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Diet:

Both larvae and adults are predatory, feeding on a variety of insects. They are known for their speed and agility, which they use to capture prey.

Behavior:

They are typically found in open, sandy areas where they hunt for prey. They are strong fliers and can quickly escape predators or pursue prey.

Pest Status and Control:

Oblique-Lined Tiger Beetles are beneficial predators and are not considered pests. They help control populations of other insects and do not require pest control measures.

Texas Flower Scarab (Trichiotinus texanus)

Classification:

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Family: Scarabaeidae

Physical Appearance:

The Texas Flower Scarab is a brightly colored beetle, often with a hairy appearance. It is typically yellow to brown with varied patterns and is part of the scarab family.

Lifecycle:

The Texas Flower Scarab has a complete life cycle, with larval stages that develop in the soil, feeding on decomposing organic matter.

Diet:

Adults are commonly found on flowers where they feed on pollen and nectar.

Behavior:

These beetles are good fliers and are often seen visiting flowers during the day, playing a role in pollination.

Pest Status and Control:

The Texas Flower Scarab is not considered a pest and is beneficial for its role in pollination. No control measures are necessary for these beetles.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the black beetles with markings that we have discussed illustrate the incredible variety and complexity of these insects.

Each species, from the Diabolical Ironclad Beetle to the Texas Flower Scarab, plays a specific role in its habitat.

While some may be pests, others are crucial for controlling pest populations or for pollination.

Understanding these beetles helps us recognize the importance of every creature in the ecosystem and the need to maintain a balanced environment.

Whether managing them as pests or protecting them for their beneficial roles, it’s clear that these marked beetles are integral to the health of their ecosystems.

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Longhorned Borer: Xestoleptura crassicornis

some kind of beetle?
Dear Bugman,
I found this bug crawling in the hallway of our home in San Francisco, CA. Sorry about the blurry photos — it was a fast mover and I’m not good with the digital camera. It had wings, but didn’t use them much. I’ve never seen this bug inside or outside, so it piqued my curiosity. Thanks!
Julie

Hi Julie,
We can’t seem to find an exact identification for your Long Horned Borer Beetle, Family Cerambycidae, in our old Dillon and Dillon Beetle Book, but fear not as we have several beetle experts who will probably be notifying us shortly.

Ed. Note: We just received this information.
(08/09/2005) identifications
Hello – I was recently shown your site, and it is excellent. My specialization is longhorned beetles, and in cruising around I notice a number of incomplete or uncertain IDs for this family. I don’t know if you are interested in receiving this sort of input, but if you are, I offer the following additions to your identifications.
This is Xestoleptura crassicornis, an uncommonly collected species which typically breeds in older, dried pine logs, and is found throughout most of the forested portions of the north and central coast, and inland in southern CA.Keep up the good work. You are a valuable resource.
Cheers
Frank Hovore

Letter 2 – Monochamus Borer Beetle probably M. scutellatus

Large black insect in northern Quebec
Recently while on vacation in Quebec (Saguenay Fjord area), I saw this rather large insect on some wildflowers on the side of the road. Taking its long antennae into account, it was at least 3 inches or more in length. Any idea what it could be?
Josh

Hi Josh,
You have sent in a photo of one of the Long Horned Borer Beetles from the genus Monochamus. The larvae make a buzzing sound when they feed, hence they are called Sawyer Beetles. Most species of this genus attack felled or dead pines. We are checking with an expert to get an exact species name. Our beetle expert Dan wrote back: “if this dude is indeed black as it looks in the pic, then it is probably Monochamus scutellatus.
dan”

Letter 3 – Wood Boring Beetle

what this bug
Attached please find a photo of a flying insect i found enjoying the spring sunshine around my woodpile. the wings are hard to see but they can fly. they crawl very fast.
can you tell what they are?
thank you
jason sagerman

Hi Jason,
This is one of the Long Horned Borer Beetles from the Family Cerambycidae. Larva bore in wood. Perhaps your specimen just emerged after spring metamorphosis aftel living several years in the wood. We wanted to try to be more specific, so we wrote to Eric Eaton who kindly replied: “The borer is a species of Neoclytus in the Cerambycidae. Not knowing anything more, I wouldn’t venture a species guess. They are wasp mimics of course, with those markings and overall leggy appearance, short antennae. Thanks for sharing. It is like Christmas every time I open one of your e-mails.”

 

Authors

    by
  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

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