From the monthly archives: "September 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: swallowtail crysalis
Location: Grand Junction, CO
September 30, 2013 6:26 pm
I believe I have found a double swallowtail chrysalis. I had to move it from where it was partially buried in the ground and under a stack of bricks. Where can I put it so that it will winter well? We live in the high desert in Grand Junction, CO, so we’re still watering the garden.
Signature: Em

Sphinx Pupa

Sphinx Pupa

Dear Em,
Were there tomatoes planted near the collection site?  This is the pupa of a solanaceous eating Sphinx Moth in the genus
Manduca.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Staten Island N.Y.
September 30, 2013 1:27 pm
Do you know what kind of moth this is?
Signature: Brian

Brown Pandorus Sphinx

Brown Pandorus Sphinx

Hi Brian,
Typically, the Pandorus Sphinx is a lovely green moth that is often described as looking like camouflage.  We haven’t ever seen a brown individual, and we cannot say if your variation is rare.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mimic Fly ?
Location: Greenville SC
September 30, 2013 1:16 pm
Have noticed this insect around my house for several years and finally got the attached photo from my cell phone Am wondering if this is a Yellowjacket Hover Fly (Yellowjacket Hover Fly, Milesia virginiensis) ?
Signature: James

Good News Bee is Yellow Jacket Hover Fly

Good News Bee is Yellow Jacket Hover Fly

Hi James,
Your identification is absolutely correct, though you didn’t mention the common name Good News Bee for the Yellow Jacket Hover Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Crane Fly
Location: Putnam Valley, NY
September 30, 2013 10:20 am
Thanks to your website, I was able to identify this fascinating ”bug”, that was on the wall of my sister’s house in Putnam Valley, NY, a few days ago. The popular guess was ”a mosquito”…but I wasn’t convinced!
Signature: Gabe Laffy

Giant Eastern Crane Fly

Giant Eastern Crane Fly

Hi Gabe,
The distinctive markings on the wings distinguish the Giant Eastern Crane Fly,
Pedicia albivitta.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Loud & Fast; Scares the Dog
Location: Missouri, 60 miles from St Louis
September 30, 2013 2:31 am
Several of these show up around our house each spring-early fall. They will hover in place for a while, then take off really fast, zooming around for a while before suddenly stopping to hover in place. The hum/buzz of their wings is loud, my dog even refuses to go outside when he hears them. They fly very fast when they aren’t hovering (my grandpa started calling them ’bullet bugs’). I finally managed to catch one with a grocery bag so I could photograph it. If you can identify it, I’d love to know what this is that scares my dog (and if he has good reason to be scared!)
Signature: Cassie

Horse Fly

Horse Fly

Dear Cassie,
This is a Horse Fly in the family Tabanidae, and according to BugGuide:  “Females (but not males) suck vertebrate blood which they need to produce eggs.”  We are not certain of the species, but your individual resembles 
Tabanus calens which is pictured on BugGuide.  Your individual appears to be a male, which will not bite.  If you dog has had a bad experience with one or more females buzzing prior to biting, you dog might be remembering the experience.  Horse Flies generally feed on livestock, but when livestock is not available, other warm blooded prey, including humans, will suffice.

Thanks so much for that! I searched around for a while trying to find out what they are, but didn’t have luck. I’m usually better at identification when it comes to spiders (Love them so much).
Next time I get really good spider pics, I’ll be sharing them like I did my fishing spider before.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: SW Utah Bug
Location: Southwestern Utah
September 29, 2013 8:10 pm
I ran across two bugs today while hiking in Southwestern Utah. One light blue one and one green one. I have never seen these before and would like to know what they are.
Signature: Linda H.

Desert Ironclad Beetle

Desert Ironclad Beetle

Hi Linda,
Your blue beetle is a Desert Ironclad Beetle,
Asbolus verrucosus, and since it is the end of the month and time for us to feature a new Bug of the Month for October, we have selected your submission.  The color of the beetle is nicely contrasted by the red color of the rocks and substrate depicted in your photograph.  There is a comment posted to BugGuide from a person who has raised Desert Ironclad Beetles in captivity and claims to have several individuals that lived more than ten years.  The BirdAndHike Wildlife Around Las Vegas website states:  “Desert Ironclad Beetles (Asbolus verrucosus) are medium-sized, fast moving beetles of the desert. These beetles eat plant debris on the desert floor, and apparently make good pets that live more than 10 years.”  Another common name is Blue Death Feigning Beetle, and  according to Bugs in Cyberspace, that name refers to:  “their tendency to play dead when bothered, combined with a powder blue colored coating they excrete on themselves to protect them from the sun.”  Your green insect is a Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination