From the monthly archives: "May 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this bug?
Location: west central wisconsin
May 31, 2013 4:29 am
My son found this crawling up his garage wall. He said it was about 4 inches long, with many legs, and a very sturdy body. It resembles the pictures of the water Tigers but has many more legs. They just moved into this place which is right next to a river in west central Wisconsin and they’re curious to know if they’re going to be seeing more of these kind of bugs.
Signature: bug identification

Hellgrammite

Hellgrammite

Congratulations on being introduced to a Hellgrammite.  These semiaquatic nymphs are usually found not far from water, so the river you mentioned is most likely its origin.  Hellgrammites eventually metamorphose into fearsome looking, but perfectly harmless Dobsonflies.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green spider
Location: San Jose del Cabo, B.C.S., Mexico.
May 30, 2013 10:56 am
Hello,
I live in a semi desertic area located in Los Cabos, Mexico, and found a spider i never seen before just outside my house. I want to know if its in any way harmfull as we appreciate bugs that arent a danger to us or our pets.
Signature: Luis Meza

Green Lynx Spider

Green Lynx Spider

Hi Luis,
This is a harmless Green Lynx Spider.  They are hunting spiders that do not spin webs to trap prey.  They blend in with foliage or sometimes hide in blossoms, and they pounce upon unsuspecting flying insects with amazing accuracy, often from a great distance.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: San Marcos, CA
May 29, 2013 10:04 pm
I found this guy crawling up the wall in my house. It’s about 3/4 inch long and liked to make quick, jumpy movements. Thanks for the ID, bugman!
Signature: redfive

Wind Scorpion

Wind Scorpion

Dear redfive,
This nonvenomous arachnid is a Solifugid, commonly called a Sun Spider or a Wind Scorpion, though it is neither a spider nor a scorpion.  Despite not having venom, they are fierce predators that can capture and dispatch large prey.  Even though they are perfectly harmless, the frightening appearance of Solifugids leads to much Unnecessary Carnage.  We are tagging your entry as the Bug of the Month for June.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown fly from western MD
Location: Western Maryland
May 30, 2013 2:36 am
Hi Bugman,
Another query for you. This one I’m fairly sure is a fly, at least. I looked through the fly pages, but couldn’t find anything that looked similar.
Photo was taken 5/26/13 in Swallow Falls State Park in western Maryland, in a forested area about 100 yards away from the river. Subject was about the size of a regular house fly. Apologies for the lack of detail, picture taken with iphone.
Signature: long time reader, first time caller

Snipe Fly

Snipe Fly

Dear long time reader,
We believe this is a Snipe Fly.  You can compare your image to the Common Snipe Fly,
Rhagio mystaceus, photos on BugGuide.  There isn’t much species information posted, but the data page shows most sightings in May and June.  The family page on BugGuide states:  “Both adults and larvae are predaceous on a variety of small insects.”   

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Some kind of fly?
Location: Lynchburg, VA
May 29, 2013 6:24 pm
Observed this critter in Lynchburg, VA, May 29, about 2:30 pm.
It’s happily devouring something which I think looks a little like a firefly, but not too much of it is left. When I tried to get closer & see whether it has two wings or four, it took off, but I think it’s two. Size: approx 7/8” long.
Some kind of fly?
Signature: Ann Bee Zee

Virginia Bee Killer

Virginia Bee Killer

Dear Ann Bee Zee,
This is a predatory Robber Fly in the genus
Laphria, and we believe it is the Virginia Bee Killer, Laphria virginica.  We compared your photo to images on BugGuide.  These impressive insects often take prey on the wing, and they are often seen preying upon bees and wasps.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cecropia?
Location: Elmira, NY
May 28, 2013 8:37 pm
We found this beautiful thing in July 2012. I tried to put it back and it kept going for the ground. So we decided to keep it in a can. It made a cocoon and nothing every happened. Tonight it arrived (10 months later). I would set it free tonight but it’s raining. I hope it will be okay overnight.
Signature: Michelle Buchanan

Cecropia Caterpillar

Cecropia Caterpillar

Hi Michelle,
Your identification of a Cecropia Moth Caterpillar and adult moth is correct.  Congratulations on successfully rearing this beautiful creature from the caterpillar through adult.  We wish there was better resolution in the photo of the adult moth.  It appears that the antennae are not especially plumose or feathery, indicating that this is a female Cecropia Moth.  If she is releasing pheromones, you might be greeted by her attracting all the males in the vicinity.

Cecropia Moth

Cecropia Moth

Daniel, thanks so much for your response. We set it free this morning, and I’ve attached a few pictures I took with my good camera so you. Can enjoy this beautiful creature.

Cecropia Moth

Cecropia Moth

Hi Again Michelle,
Thanks for the additional and higher quality photos.  We still believe she is a female.

Cecropia Moth

Cecropia Moth


 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination