From the monthly archives: "April 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Daniel – What’s This Thing!
Location: Hawthorne, CA
April 30, 2013 1:10 pm
Hi Daniel,
Hope all is well with you. I’ve not had any unusual sightings recently, so have been away from WTB. Today I spied something in a cactus grouping and cannot figure out what it is. I’m hoping that the photo is clear enough for you to tell what it is and maybe share with me?
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Nymphalid Chrysalid

Nymphalid Chrysalid

Hi Anna,
How nice to hear from you.  We always love your submissions.  We believe this is the Chrysalis or Pupa of a Butterfly in the family Nymphalidae, the Brush Footed Butterflies.  It reminds us a bit of the chrysalis of a Variegated Fritillary or a Buckeye.

Daniel,
Thanks very much.  I think it is a Gulf Fritillary chrysalis.  These butterflies are regular visitors to our little patch.  I’m guessing it chose the cactus for protection, but hope the butterfly makes it out unscathed!
Anna

Hi Anna,
We were going to look up the Gulf Fritillary Chrysalis to see if it matched, but we didn’t have time.  Thanks for the update.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fence Post Beetle
Location: Ola, Idaho
April 29, 2013 10:24 pm
Here is a photo of a beetle I spotted on a fence post. It seemed like these were quite common in the area; most wooden fence posts had one or two of these lounging about. This was taken at an altitude of about 4000 feet in late April near Ola, Idaho. If need be I have about ten more good photos of this type of beetle.
Signature: Buck Rekow

Possibly Checkered Beetle

Blister Beetle:  Tricrania stansburyi

Hi Buck,
Alas, we are zero for two with your requests this morning.  We love your photographs.  Our initial thought is that this might be a Checkered Beetle in the family Cleridae, but we are not certain.  Our initial search did not turn up any matches and we must leave to go to work.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide an ID in our absence.

Correction:  Blister Beetle
Thanks to a correction by Tenodera, we have now come to the conclusion that this is a Blister Beetle,
Tricrania stansburyi, and this can be verified on BugGuide.

If you enjoy the photos, here are two more of the beetle. One gives a clearer view of the mandibles. If the quality is not great enough, you can discard them.

Blister Beetle

Blister Beetle

Thanks so much for the additional photos.

Blister Beetle

Blister Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Clumsy mountain bee
Location: Ola, Idaho
April 29, 2013 10:16 pm
Here is a bee I photographed in a patch of Mule’s Ear. There were two other varieties of bee out that day, but these are the only ones that would stay still for a photo. I took these in late April at an elevation around 4000 feet near Ola, Idaho.
Signature: Buck Rekow

What's That Bee???

What’s That Hymenopteran???

Dear Buck,
We do not recognize your Bee and we haven’t time to research its identity prior to posting.  Perhaps one of our readers can supply a comment regarding the identity of this Solitary Bee.

Solitary Bee

Solitary Bee or Sawfly???

Update:  Probably a Sawfly
Thanks to a comment from Austin, we took a closer look, and while we still cannot provide a species, we believe Austin is correct that this is a Sawfly.  The clubbed antennae seem pretty convincing.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug and should i be worried???
Location: Valley Center, California
April 29, 2013 10:32 pm
Hi Bugman,
My name is Nathan and these weird bugs have recently entered my house. I live in Valley Center, California ( a couple miles north of San Diego). These bugs have red heads, dark brown (maybe black) bodies, and wings. My little brother is scared of them and i just want to make sure he (and the rest of my family) are in no danger. Thank you for the help!!!
Signature: Nathan Reeve

Brown Leatherwing

Brown Leatherwing

Hi Nathan,
Thanks for sending in this photo.  We have been neglecting taking a photo of the Brown Leatherwings that are attracted to our own porch light each spring.  The Brown Leatherwing,
Pacificanthia consors, is a west coast species that is considered beneficial.  Here is what Charles Hogue wrote of the Brown Leatherwing in Insects of the Los Angeles Basin in our second edition from 1993:  “Adults frequently come to porch lights in the late spring (April to May).  They give off a strong unpleasant musty odor when handled or crushed and may also exude a yellow fluid.  Little else is known of the habits of the adults, and the early stages remain undescribed.  Both are probably ground dwellers that live in plant litter and prey on other insects.”  They pose no danger to you or your family.  Brown Leatherwings appear each spring and remain for approximately six weeks.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Northern California
April 29, 2013 10:51 pm
Do you have any idea what kind of bug this is? it is all over my pride of madeira plant. Thanks.
Signature: Steve

Lady Beetle Pupa

Lady Beetle Pupa

Dear Steve,
All insects undergo metamorphosis, and those that undergo complete metamorphosis like butterflies and beetles often have immature forms that look nothing like the adult insect.  This is the pupa of a Lady Beetle or Ladybug.  Ladybug is a common name not recognized by scientists since they are actually beetles.  The larva of a Lady Beetle is often compared to a small alligator.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Philolithus morbillosus?
Location: West Texas
April 29, 2013 12:02 pm
We took this picture in Guadulupe Mountians National Park in West Texas. The only think I found similar to it on the internet is Philolithus morbillosus. We found it in July of 2012.
Signature: Tinker

Darkling Beetle

Darkling Beetle

Dear Tinker,
We do not believe you have correctly identified this Darkling Beetle correctly.  If you look at the images of
Philolithus morbillosus from BugGuide, you can see that the elytra or wing covers are more sculpted and the shape of the thorax is different.  We also believe you have the correct tribe, Asidini, as well as the correct family Tenebrionidae, the Darkling Beetles.  See examples of Asidini on BugGuide.  We will try to get Eric Eaton’s opinion, however he informed us he is traveling and will have limited internet access.

Eric Eaton confirms our suspicions
Daniel:
No, we are traveling NEXT week.  I’ve got blog assignments for a third party, though, so….
I believe this is a species of Asidopsis, but there are other similar genera, so….
Eric

Thanks Eric,
We suspected this was in the tribe Asidini, and
Asidopsis seemed like a good possibility.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination