From the monthly archives: "February 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ’Beaver’Beetle , Bulisa, Uganda
Location: Bulisa, Uganda
February 28, 2013 5:35 am
Hi,
the attached picture is of a pair of mating beetles on a tree in Uganda. The beetles spend most of their time on the tree and work as a pair to ’beaver’ cut through one branch after another. See the female in the pic continuing to cut on this occasion during mating.
Having cut through 90% of the branch thickness, they then strip all the leaves from all lower sections of the cut branch, then they cut right through the tip end of each section jof the cut branch.
Any suggestions as to what they are and more details on their habits would be interesting.
Signature: Kay

Mating Longicorns

Mating Longicorns:  Analeptes trifasciata

Dear Kay,
These mating Longicorns or Longhorned Borer Beetles in the family Cerambycidae are stunningly beautiful, but alas, we cannot research the species as time has run out for us on the computer this morning.  We hope a reader does this research in our absence.

Mating Longicorns

Mating Longicorns:  Analeptes trifasciata

Thanks,
I searched on Beetles of Africa website and found it identified as Analaptes Trifasciata – not found any more details on the very interesting way it appears to harvest the host tree.
I since found a similar beetle similarly identified on your own site.
Thanks for the help,
Regards,
Karl

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshopper
Location: Kruger Park, South Africa
February 28, 2013 7:07 am
can you help me identify this bug
Signature: Allison

Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

Dear Allison,
This is a Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper in the family Pyrgomorphidae.  It looks similar to, but different from, the Koppie Foam Grasshopper.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: cockroach or beetle?
Location: MALAYSIA
February 27, 2013 11:54 pm
Hello there bugman. I was wondering what kind of bug is this? It can even fly around and it has the eyebrow looking stuff i mean eyelashes .. Tried google it but doesnt have anything returned
This is the picture i have uploaded hopefully i will get to know this more. Thanks
Signature: BRANDON

Beetle with Plumose Antennae

Beetle with Plumose Antennae

Dear Brandon,
The entomological term to describe this beetle’s antennae is plumose and you can see examples of plumose antennae on BugGuide.  In form, your beetle resembles a Click Beetle in the family Elateridae, and there are Click Beetles with plumose antennae, but we suspect that this might be a member of a smaller and more obscure family of beetles that is contained within the superfamily Elateroidea.  We decided to search our own archives and we found that a very similar beetle was our 10,000th posting and it was tentatively identified as
Callirhipis cardwellensis.  Not long after that, we posted an individual, also from Malaysia, that looks identical to your beetle.  If your beetle is Callirhipis cardwellensis, then it belongs in the family Callirhipidae, as evidenced by these specimen tags on the Victoria Museum website.  According to BugGuide, the family Callirhipidae contains Callirhipid Cedar Beetles.  We are certain that your networking cache will spike as soon as you are able to post the identity of this unusual beetle.

Possibly Callirhipis cardwellensis

Possibly Callirhipis cardwellensis

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Juiz de Fora / MG / Brazil
February 27, 2013 9:52 am
Hello, I found two caterpillars like this and would like to identify the species in order to breed in captivity
Signature: Raphaela Campos

Possible Early Instar Hornworm

Possible Early Instar Hornworm

Hi Raphaela,
We believe this might be an early instar Hornworm in the family Sphingidae.  We will check with Bill Oehlke.

Bill Oehlke concurs
Daniel,
I suspect one of the Isognathus species of Sphingidae
I would be happy to try to help the photographer with rearing instructions
if he/she would like to try to rear it through to adulthood and provide
images of the various stages along the way. I would have a better chance of
doing the id with image of mature larva or moth. Feel free to give
photographer my email and the info above.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: beetle
Location: northern wisconsin
February 26, 2013 12:05 pm
We have been seeing these insects inside the house for the last several weeks, perhaps one or two a day. We don’t remember seeing them in the house prior to this winter. They started appearing after our first significant snowfall of the winter. They can appear anywhere in the house and are very slow moving, rarely flying.
Signature: Bob and Martha

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Bob and Martha,
Do you burn firewood in the home?  We suspect you brought in some wood and these Longhorned Borer Beetles had been living in the wood as wood boring larvae, and that they were most likely in the pupa stage when the heat of the home caused them to emerge early.  We are pressed for time this morning, and cannot browse through the family Cerambycidae on BugGuide to identify the species.  Perhaps while we are at our regular job, one of our readers will supply a comment with an identification.  We will try to determine a species at a later date.

Update:  February 27, 2013
Thanks to a comment identifying this as a Tan Bark Borer, Phymatodes testaceus, we are investigating on BugGuide
.  It appears we might be getting confused with Martha.  According to BugGuide, the Tan Bark Borer is:  “native to Eurasia; widely established around the world, incl. e. US and, more recently, in the Pacific Northwest”

Thanks for the tip – we do burn firewood and Martha suspected that that might be the source of the beetle.  From the photos on your site, we think that it is an oxycopis thoracica
Bob and Martha

Well, on further review it appears to be Phymatodes testaceus, which makes more sense given it’s oak firewood origin.
Thanks again,
Bob and Martha

Hi again Bob and Martha,
When we received a comment that this was a Tan Bark Borer, we turned to BugGuide.  We saw your submission that “Martha thinks they are coming from the firewood” and we suspected that we were being confused with Martha Stewart.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknow insect Townsville
Location: Townsville, Australia
February 27, 2013 7:04 am
Took this photo of this insect this morning on a Passion Fruit Vine.
Signature: Your Sincerly

Probably Coreid Nymph

Probably Coreid Nymph

Dear Sincerly,
We are guessing your name is André as that is the name copyrighted on the photograph.  This is an immature Heteropteran or True Bug and nymphs can be difficult to identify with certainty as they are not as well
documented as adults.  We suspect this is a Coreid Nymph from the family Coreidae, and the members of the family are often called Big Legged Bugs or Leaf Footed Bugs.  Knowing the host plant is a Passion Fruit Vine may assist in our identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination