What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: More Sleepy Organge Butterflies?
Location: Coryell County, central Texas
January 21, 2013 2:03 am
Hello, I think we may be seeing more of the Sleepy Orange Butterflies. I should keep trying to find the name of this wildflower and plant it as ground cover if it isn’t noxious. The butterflies love it, and it’s hardy enough to endure cold night temps in the twenties and still thrive and bloom in January as soon as the afternoons warm up. The butterflies and wildflowers are amazingly resilient!
Signature: Ellen

Sleepy Orange

Hi Ellen,
It is nice to get the additional photo to supplement the image you sent in December of a Sleepy Orange.  We will request assistance with the plant identification from our readership.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: Texas
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3 Responses to Sleepy Orange, and What's That Plant???

  1. Ellen S. says:

    Thank you for your help! I may have found it in my reference book “Wildflowers of the Texas Hill Country”. The plant may be a variety of Corn-Salad, Valerianella amarella. If so, it’s a native plant known to be edible, an early bloomer, cold hardy, and an annual. The “Wildflowers of Texas” book says about a different species, Woods Corn-Salad, “It is an excellent plant for the wildflower garden, the white, lacy bloom-clusters mixing well with the other spring flowers. It is very difficult to distinguish the various species of corn-salad found in Texas, with the fruit-shape being the most definitive characteristic. Thank you again!

  2. Ellen S. says:

    … forgot the end quotes, getting used to a laptop! Love your website, and thank you again!

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