From the monthly archives: "January 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider name
Location: Iguazu falls national park, Argentina/Brazil
January 31, 2013 8:53 am
I was on holidays in the beautiful Iguazu falls this summer. I saw a lot of these spiders and butterflies. However, after some research on the internet, I have been unable to find the exact scientific name. Could you please help me?
Signature: Filipe De Vadder

Orbweaver

Hi Filipe,
Your spider is an Orbweaver, most likely in the family Araneidae.  We haven’t the time right now to research the species name.

Update:  February 1, 2013
Cesar Crash from Insetologia Blog wrote in that this appears to be a species in the genus
 Alpaida.  Based on this photo on EcoRegistros, he might be correct.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fuzzy cocoon? … fuzzy thing attatched to column in ft Myers beach fl
Location: ft Myers beach Florida
January 30, 2013 9:49 pm
Dear Bugman,
…. I also would like it if you could identify this cocoon, there were tons all over colums where I am staying, through the ”fur” I could see some shiny brown, this particular one was about an inch (maybe a little smaller since my sense of measurement lacks). Thank you!
Signature: Moth Ninja

Oleander Moth Cocoon

Hi again Moth Ninja,
Are there oleander plants where you are staying?  They are quite common in Florida.  We believe this is the cocoon of an Oleander Moth or Polka Dot Wasp Moth,
Syntomeida epilais, and you can compare your photo to this image on BugGuide.

Dear Bugman, thank you for the quick response! I’m not too sure if there are any oleander plants around, but I’m sure your identification is correct seeing as I’ve seen that moth around! I wish I could stay to watch the cocoon hatch but I leave Florida tomorrow. I’m a huge fan of your site and have been for years. It’s helped me to realize house centipedes are actually beneficial in my house! And I am no longer afraid of a lot of little friends! Thank you again for the identification, I will keep my eyes peeled for anymore interesting buggies!

We are so happy to hear you are tolerant of House Centipedes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fuzzy cocoon? streaked sphinx moth and fuzzy thing attatched to column in ft Myers beach fl
Location: ft Myers beach Florida
January 30, 2013 9:49 pm
Dear Bugman,
I saw a couple streaked sphynx moths and wanted to share the picture, I touched it and it got scared and started flitting its wings really fast and it showed an orange patch, I think it was to scare predators. I also would like it if you could identify this cocoon, there were tons all over colums where I am staying, through the ”fur” I could see some shiny brown, this particular one was about an inch (maybe a little smaller since my sense of measurement lacks). Thank you!
Signature: Moth Ninja

Streaked Sphinx

Dear Moth Ninja,
Thank you so much for providing your photos of a Streaked Sphinx,
Protambulyx strigilis, for our archive.  According to BugGuide:  ” Host plants are various woody plants in the cashew family (Anacardiaceae), primarily Brazilian peppertree – Schinus terebinthifolius. Larva also on Anacardium, Spondias, Erythroxylon, Comocladia.”  We will get back to you on the cocoon.

Streaked Sphinx

Ed. Note: February 1, 2013
It is time for a new Bug of the Month and we just received a comment from a reader indicating another sighting of a Streaked Sphinx, but alas, without a photo.  We returned to BugGuide to research a bit more on this moth, and we learned:  “Adults recorded year round in Florida.”  BugGuide also has this set of remarks, which caused us to ponder climate change, as we frequently do:  “First US record of Protambulyx strigilis (Linnaeus) from Palm Beach, FL. (Barnes and McDunnough 1910)  Kimball (1965) reported only a few subsequent FL records, most of which he considered questionable. Note, Carter’s Sphinx – Protambulyx carteri Rothschild & Jordan, 1903 has long been common in Florida.”
  This is basically a neotropical species that is recorded in southern Texas and Florida, but it seems sightings are becoming more common.  If there is actually global warming, insects are a perfect place to look for evidence.  If sightings were first recorded in the early twentieth century, that is concurrent with the proliferation of factories that began producing goods that were needed for an ever increasing global population.  More information on the Streaked Sphinx can be found on Sphingidae of the Americas.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Un known caterpillar
Location: Bulawayo, Zimbabwe
January 31, 2013 2:21 am
Hi guys do you recognize this caterpillar? this is a new one for me.
Signature: Kind Regards

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

This is the caterpillar of a Death’s Head Hawkmoth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you help me identify this insect?
Location: Fort Worth, TX
January 31, 2013 12:54 am
This bug bit me in my own bed and I was wondering if you could help me identify it. I couldn’t get a better picture because it was 5 a.m. and I used my phone to snap the shot before it got flushed. I didn’t think to save it and/or get a better shot.
It was not all that big, maybe an inch or a little less in length. The under side and legs were green and it had brown overlapping wings. Some of my friends said it looked like a kissing bug but all the photos I found of those showed black or brown bugs and this one was green.
It originally landed on my forehead and I grabbed it. It attached to my finger and I had to, basically, scrape it off with the side of my bed. After I turned on a light I ended up accidently laying on it with my leg and it bit and/or stung my inner thigh by my knee. The bit was VERY painful and it did swell but only around the ’wound’ and the swelling went away within 2-3 hours. I still have the red make where it bit me, though. I have noticed no other effects since it happened.
Again, I apologize for the quality of the photographs. I wear contacts and had none in when the incident occurred, as well it landing on me in the dark, so I kind of freaked out and took the shots on my phone with shaking hands.
Signature: Nicole Pierce

Assassin Bug

Hi Nicole,
This is an Assassin Bug in the genus
ZelusWe understand the bite is quite painful, but it produces no lasting negative effects.  Zelus Assassin Bugs bite folks with some degree of frequency if the letters we receive are any indication.  Kissing Bugs are also Assassin Bugs, and they are one of the few groups of Assassin Bugs that do pose a threat to humans because they are known vectors for Chagas Disease.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Daughter’s find
Location: Perth, Western Australia
January 31, 2013 9:01 am
Hi,
My daughter found this on its back and asked, ”Is it a monster?”
Up close it certainly looks that way with a prawn/lobster like head and beetle like body. It has two stubby front limbs that are flattened and spiny at the ends.
It was found in my back yard and aside from, ’what is it?’ I’d also like to know whether it is friend or foe (I never know in Australia, most things here will kill you!)
Many thanks,
Jeff
Signature: Jeff

Mole Cricket

Hi Jeff,
This is a Mole Cricket, a subterranean dweller that uses it front legs to tunnel underground.  Interesting, exactly one year ago, submissions of Mole Crickets from Slovenia and Australia prompted us to declare the Mole Cricket the Bug of the Month for February 2012.

Mole Cricket

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for the prompt response, what a fantastic resource you run, I’ll bookmark your site and send you any more interesting finds.
Kind regards,
Jeff

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination