From the monthly archives: "April 2010"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Black Beetle with Yellow Spots
April 30, 2010
Hi! There is an interesting black beetle with yellow smudges scurrying all over the San Felipe Baja desert this Spring. They are super fast, very aggressive, they will chase after you if you get too close! They’re bigger than a quarter.
Baja Beetle girl
San Felipe, Baja California

Desert Spider Beetle

Hi Baja Beetle girl,
The Desert Spider Beetle or Inflated Beetle is a Blister Beetle in the genus Cysteodemus, and you may read up on them on bugGuide.  We believe it is Cysteodemus armatus which Bugguide describes as:  “Flightless; distinguished from all other meloid beetles by its inflated (air space below elytra may serve as insulation), spheroid, fused elytra. Elytra are coarsely pitted, and often covered with a white to yellowish secretion.

Desert Spider Beetle

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bagworm in Papua New Guinea
April 30, 2010
Dear Bugman,
Last week we found this “thing” on the ground, presumably having fallen out of a tree. We took it home and laid it on a shelf outside our house. The next day, it had attached itself to this jar. We have, thanks to your site, identified it (her?) as a bagworm, but as her “bag” is a good eight inches (8″) long, we thought you might like to see her! As for the season, well, it’s just about always the same here. But it is just now transitioning from rainy season to dry season here. Thanks for helping us identify her! She’s a beauty!
We are curious, too, about the grub in picture three. The coin is about the size of a quarter, so it’s a big one. Any idea what it becomes? Thanks!
Sharon
Papua New Guinea

Bagworm

Hi again Sharon,
What a gorgeous Bagworm.  We will try to identify the species.  The grub is a Scarab Grub, probably a May Beetle.

Bagworm

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Some more great bugs from PNG
April 30, 2010
There are so many awesome bugs here in Papua New Guinea, and I know we’ve only seen the tip of the proverbial iceberg. Here are a few we thought you would like to see.
The first is called, at least locally, a “Christmas spider.” Perhaps you can identify it? They’re rather small – the largest being only about an inch across. The second, some kind of leaf bug? It was about 3″ long, not including antennae. The third, a borer, also about 3″ long not including antennae, which had a spread of about 8″. The spider and leaf bug were photographed near Madang and the borer was photographed in Buka, Bougainville. Enjoy!!
Sharon
Papua New Guinea

Batocera kibleri

Hi Sharon,
We are keeping quite busy today just posting your wonderful images.  We will try to identify this lovely Longicorn.

Comment with Identification
Believe it may be Batocera kibleri. A few links for you to look at… http://www.cerambycoidea.com/foto.asp?Id=67
and http://www.golofa.fr/aff_catalogue.php?groupe=1&famille=1&continent=4#thumb
I hope this helps, though I couldn’t find very much information on the beetle itself.
lttlechkn

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Some more great bugs from PNG
April 30, 2010
There are so many awesome bugs here in Papua New Guinea, and I know we’ve only seen the tip of the proverbial iceberg. Here are a few we thought you would like to see.
The first is called, at least locally, a “Christmas spider.” Perhaps you can identify it? They’re rather small – the largest being only about an inch across. The second, some kind of leaf bug? It was about 3″ long, not including antennae. The third, a borer, also about 3″ long not including antennae, which had a spread of about 8″. The spider and leaf bug were photographed near Madang and the borer was photographed in Buka, Bougainville. Enjoy!!
Sharon
Papua New Guinea

Sylvan Katydid

Hi Sharon,
Your leaf bug is a Katydid and we are going to write to Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can assist in the species identification.

Piotr Naskrecki identifies the Sylvan Katydid
Hi Daniel,
This is a sylvan katydid (Pseudophyllinae: Phyllomimini), most likely the genus Heteraprium. This group of katydids of New Guinea is very poorly known, nearly all species of Pseudophyllinae I collected there were new to science, and it is possible that this one is also undescribed.
Cheers,
Piotr

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Some more great bugs from PNG
April 30, 2010
There are so many awesome bugs here in Papua New Guinea, and I know we’ve only seen the tip of the proverbial iceberg. Here are a few we thought you would like to see.
The first is called, at least locally, a “Christmas spider.” Perhaps you can identify it? They’re rather small – the largest being only about an inch across. The second, some kind of leaf bug? It was about 3″ long, not including antennae. The third, a borer, also about 3″ long not including antennae, which had a spread of about 8″. The spider and leaf bug were photographed near Madang and the borer was photographed in Buka, Bougainville. Enjoy!!
Sharon
Papua New Guinea

Christmas Spider is Crablike Spiny Orbweaver

Hi Sharon,
Thanks for your numerous lovely photos.  It really mucks up our archives if we include radically different categories of bugs in a single posting, so we are only posting your photo of the Christmas Spider, probably in the genus Gasteracantha, also known as the Crablike Spiny Orbweavers or Jewel Spiders.  The Brisbane Insect website has a page devoted to a different but similar species. Read Full Post →

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Please identify this insect pod?
April 29, 2010
Bugman, I turned up this pod in a small garden plot in my backyard in NW Arkansas. I thought it might be a pod of a Cicada, but could not find anything on the internet to identify it. Your help would be appreciated.
Charlie
Charlie McKinnie
North West Arkansas (Holiday Island)

Sphinx Moth Pupa

Hi Charlie,
This is the pupa of a Sphinx Moth, most likely one of the species in the genus Manduca that have caterpillars which feed upon the leaves of tomato plants.  After gorging on leaves for a few weeks, the caterpillar buries itself an pupates.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination