From the monthly archives: "January 2010"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

katydid with leaf-like wings
January 31, 2010
The photo of the dead leaf mimic got me thinking about the katydid I found in my backyard in northwestern New Jersey last August. Its wings have that amazing vein-pattern of leaves. One can see how, with just a little nip and tuck from natural selection, the dead leaf mimics evolve. Thank you for your wonderful work.
jeannie
newton, new jersey

Forktailed Bush Katydid

Hi Jeannie,
Thank you for your kind letter, and also providing such a detailed image of a Bush Katydid in the genus Scudderia.  We believe this is a female Scudderia fasciata, the Treetop Bush Katydid, based on images posted to BugGuide.  We will see if Piotr Naskrecki is able to provide a confirmation of that identification.

Correction thanks to Piotr Naskrecki
HI Daniel,
I think that this is Scudderia furcata, rather than S. fasciata (which usually has more black coloring on its wings.)
Cheers,
Piotr

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Don’t have a clue where to start with this one
January 31, 2010
Hi,
I haven’t got a clue what this is. I took the shot in Tortuguero National Park in Costa Rica.
Thanks
Miles
Costa Rica, Caribeean coast

Planthopper

Hi again Miles,
This is a Freeliving Hemipteran in the suborder Auchenorrhyncha, and probably in the superfamily Fulgoroidea.  It may be one of the Issid Planthoppers in the family Issidae or perhaps a Cixiid Planthopper in the family Cixiidae.  Though they are not your of species, we have linked to some photos on BugGuide that look similar enough to have made the general identification we provided.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide a species identification.

Karl finds some information
Hi Daniel and Miles:
This looks like a Net-winged Hopper in the family Nogodinidae, a relatively small group of planthoppers that are quite similar to the Issidae, of which they are sometimes considered to be a subfamily. It is difficult to find much information about the group, but there are several photos identified as Biolleyana costalis and Biolleyana sp. posted on Flickr that look more or less identical. The Electronic Biologia Centrali-Americana provides very similar illustrations under the older synonym, Sassula costalis. Regards.
Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Could you ID this beetle for me?
January 31, 2010
I found this guy in a limb fallen from a tree in my side yard. I live in Orange county, NY. I’m not sure of the tree species but it is a hard wood. the beetle is about 1.5 inches long and has very distinctive black and white markings.
I also found round head wood borers in the same wood. The pictures are pretty good, hope you can help me out.
John Rankin
Orange countu, NY

Eyed Elater

Hi John,
This is a Click Beetle known as an Eyed Elater.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bug from Honduras
January 31, 2010
Dear Bugman,
We found this pretty bug on the wall of our home today, and wondered if you could identify it for us.
Thanks so much!
Trish in Honduras
Gracias, Lempira Honduras

Ironclad Beetle

Hi Trish,
This beauty is an Ironclad Beetle in the genus Zopherus.  We found a photo on Flickr that might be Zopherus jansoni, but the identification is not conclusive. That photo which was taken in Costa Rica looks very similar to your individual.  We also located online pdf documents that describe Zopherus mexicanus, Zopherus jansoni, Zopherus costaricensis and Zopherus laevicollis, though we are not prepared to positively your Ironclad Beetle to the species level with these descriptions.  That would probably take an expert.

Ironclad Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Can you help me name these beetles?
January 31, 2010
Hi,
please could help me to identify these beetles, all were photographed in Santa Elena cloud forest in Costa Rica in december.
Thanks,
Miles
Costa Rica

Tortoise Beetle:  Stolas cuculata

Hi Miles,
We are at the end of your identification requests, and we decided to split up your beetle requests to better align with are archives.  These two beetles are both Leaf Beetles in the family Chrysomelidae, and the black specimen with the orange spots is, we believe, a Tortoise Beetle in the tribe Cassidini.  In our attempts to identify it, we stumbled upon a Tropical Diversity in the  Amazon blog with a similarly marked, though obviously different species of Tortoise Beetle, and it was just posted yesterday.  We then found a Discover Life website with numerous links, and our first click fortuitously led us to an image of your Tortoise Beetle which was identified as Stolas cuculata.  We verified the identification on the Biol.uni website.  In our attempt to answer your question, we did find a photo on Flickr that appears to be the same species as your Leaf Beetle, but alas, it has not been identified.  We are trying to click through all the links on the Discover Life Website in the hopes to properly identify your Leaf Beetle, but we need to attend to other things at the moment.

Leaf Beetle:  Zygogramma violaceomaculata

Hi Daniel,
that’s brilliant, thanks for al of your help with identification. Great idea for a website and I am shocked that you replied so quickly. I might have one or two more….
Thanks,
Miles

Identification thanks to Karl
Hi Daniel and Miles:
The leaf beetle in the lower photo is probably Zygogramma violaceomaculata (Chrysomelidae). Zygogramma appears to be a recent re-classification; older references designate it as Calligrapha violaceomaculata. The Electronic Biologia Centrali-Americana also provides an illustration under the older name that looks pretty much identical. Regards.
Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Can you help me name these beetles?
January 31, 2010
Hi,
please could help me to identify these beetles, all were photographed in Santa Elena cloud forest in Costa Rica in december.
Thanks,
Miles
Costa Rica

Tiger Beetle

Hi again Miles,
As the label on your digital file indicates, you are aware that this is a Tiger Beetle in the subfamily Cicindelinae, but we are unable to locate a species name for you.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck.

Comment provided by Truman
Looks like Pseudoxycheila tarsalis
Apparently it mimics a species of velvet ant

Thank you Truman.  Once you provided a name, we found a photo on Flickr.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination