From the monthly archives: "June 2009"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Black beetle found in SE PEnnsylvania
Sat, Jun 27, 2009 at 3:35 PM
Can you please help us identify this beetle we found in our gravel driveway in Bucks County, PA? It’s 2″ long from front to back and appears to have wings.
Hannah
Bucks County, Pennsylvania (SE PA)

Broad Necked Root Borer

Broad Necked Root Borer

Hi Hannah,
Your beetle is a Broad Necked Root Borer, Prionus laticollis.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults eat foliage, sometimes damage fruit trees, grape vines. Life Cycle Eggs are inserted into ground (or under litter) in groups. Larvae tunnel downward to feed on living roots of a variety of trees and shrubs. At first they may feed on bark, but then proceed to hollow out small roots. Pupation occurs in spring, about 10 cm under the ground. Life cycle probably three years. “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

BIG BUG in Texas
Sun, Jun 28, 2009 at 8:26 AM
I opened my front door to my upstairs apt. to leave, and walking in very relaxed like, was this neat looking creature. Naturally, I freaked and shut the door, then remembered how slow and feeble it seemed. As if it pretty much just wanted to get in out of the heat! it’s 102’F outside right now. So i put the broom and jar down on the floor and he mozzeied right on into it….like, dum de dum de dum…. but he doesn’t seem to like the jar too much, and i would like to find out whether or not this lil guy can hurt me? what does he need to survive? Cause he obviously, doesn’t like the heat! Btw- it’s a real light brown, almost cream/khaki in color underneath all the spots top of back and belly.
Biggest Bug I’ve seen in Texas
Fort Worth, TX

Cottonwood Borer

Cottonwood Borer

Your beetle is a Cottonwood Borer, Plectrodera scalator , one of the most beautiful North American beetles. According to BugGuide: “Adults are reported to browse on shoots of host trees, especially leaf-stems (petioles), and bark.” The host tree is the cottonwood. The beetle will not harm you, though they do have strong jaws and it might pinch slightly if it tries to bite you. We would urge you to release your captive.

Update:
i put him in box with coal rocks (those red ones that are very porous) and a variety of leaves/grass and tiny dish of water next to the rocks so that he could drink… i don’t know for sure, but it appeared to of eaten one of the leaves.
He took a nap that day and when i heard him crawling around again i took him back outside and he crawled right onto the little bush like tree and posed for the most beautiful picture! Unfortunally my memory is the only picture i will ever have of that as i did not have my camera/phone on me.
Thanks!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Giant, Screaming…Fly? Sat, Jun 27, 2009 at 1:58 AM
I snapped these pics of what I assumed was a (giant) dead fly. It is approximately the length of a Bic lighter (a technical measurement here in Georgia). Later in the evening, when I went to take better photos, we found it stuck to the bottom of the door frame. When I tried to sweep it off, I could see its little legs grabbing the door frame and realized it was alive.
I started to close the back door, and when the fly ended up between the door and the threshold, it let out a LOUD, long scream. We finally pushed the door shut, and every time we got close to the not so little guy, who was now flying around the house, it would start screaming again. We decided it was suffering and snuffed it out…but what in the world was it? Its underside was a bright yellow, almost like a glowing lightning bug. Googling giant screaming fly hasn’t gotten me very far. Thanks–
J. Campbell
Athens, GA

Cicada

Cicada

Hi J.,
Your Giant Screaming Fly is actually a Cicada.  We are not certain what species of Cicada you have though.  Certain Cicadas are considered to be the loudest insects.  The scream is actually used by the male Cicada to attract a mate.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Black spots on a blue beetle
Sat, Jun 27, 2009 at 2:00 PM
Hi – We were at Windy Point on Mt Lemmon in Tucson AZ at the end of May and spotted (get it? spotted?) this handsome fellow. I have never seen anything like him before. Can you identify him? I didn’t see his wings.
Julie
Tucson AZ

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Hi Julie,
Your beetle is Gibbifer californicus, a Pleasing Fungus Beetle in the family Erotylidae.  The family members are known as Pleasing Fungus Beetles and your specimen does not have a more specific common name.  According to BugGuide, it “Southwestern United States: Kansas, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, south into Mexico ” and “Adults feed on nectar, pollen, and some fungi. Larvae feed on fungi that are attacking wood.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Enormous moth almost the size of a toothpick
Sat, Jun 27, 2009 at 7:20 PM
I found this moth this morning as I was leaving my house. I could hardly believe it was a moth at all,it is by far the largest I have ever seen in my whole life. Very unusual to find one this large in Newfoundland but here it is. I am actually quite terrified of ALL moths in general but seeing as this one is the size of a small bird and I am not afraid of birds,I’m ok with it.
It never moved a muscle all day but has gone completely mad inside it’s glass tonight. I fully intend on releasing it in the AM when it is less agressive and hopefully asleep. I certainly wouldn’t want it turning on me. Anyway could you please tell me just what sort of moth this is? The toothpick in the picture is standard size so as to give you an idea of it’s size. I couldn’t get a shot of it’s underside as it is very angry with me and not likely to sit still for a photo op.
Any information you might have on it is appreciated.
Cyndie from Newfoundland
Conception Bay South,Newfoundland. Sitting on my driveway.

Laurel Sphinx

Laurel Sphinx

Hi Cyndie,
Using Bill Oehlke’s awesome website, we quickly identified your Sphinx Moth as a Laurel Sphinx, Sphinx kalmiae.  According to the site:  “Laurel Sphinx larvae feed primarily on lilac and  fringe.  … Larvae have also been found on privet. ”

Laurel Sphinx

Laurel Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hi Bugman, could you please help identify this moth we have taken a picture of ?
Sun, Jun 28, 2009 at 6:22 AM
We live in the North East of England and we found this guy clinging to the outer wall of my Dad’s house near the porch, he has been sitting there for a few days. We have been able to have a good look at him. He looks about 3 inches wide with a body length of 1.5 inches, with brown body colours rather like a tree, with a fine black outline. His wings have a crinkled appearance also, they don’t appear straight and his body is quite thick in appearance which narrows down and turns up at the end. He has identical white markings on his wings like small half moon shapes. He could be quite common I don’t know but we thought he looked kinda special and would appreciate your help to find out what species he is. Sorry if I am calling our moth a he as I don’t have any knowledge of bugs he could well be a she! Thank you for your site, my family and I have been looking at the range of different bug’s most of which we hav’nt ever come across before and they are a delight!
Jo North East England
Sunderland North East England

Poplar Hawk-Moth

Poplar Hawk-Moth

Hi Jo,
This is a Poplar Hawk-Moth, Laothoe populi.  According to the UK Moths website, it is:  ”
Probably the commonest of our hawk-moths, it has a strange attitude when at rest, with the hindwings held forward of the forewings, and the abdomen curved upwards at the rear.  If disturbed it can flash the hindwings, which have a contrasting rufous patch, normally hidden. Distributed commonly throughout most of Britain, the adults are on the wing from May to July, when it is a frequent visitor to light. The larvae feed on poplar ( Poplar ), aspen ( P. tremula ) and sallow ( Salix ). “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination