From the monthly archives: "January 2009"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Moved Into House in Arizona, these bugs are everywhere outside
Fri, Jan 30, 2009 at 9:41 PM
I moved into a house in Peoria, Arizona. Its consider farm land out here, there are houses all around and a farm across our street. I have noticed these bugs everywhere outside. We have a shrub in the back and on the side of the house and they seem to be coming from there.
Thank You! Sara
Peoria, Az

Bordered Plant Bug

Bordered Plant Bug

Long, black with red perimeter on abdomen
Sat, Jan 31, 2009 at 11:07 AM
Around my house I see this insect all the time, but have no idea what it is. They are usually about 1 inch long, 1/4 inch wide, and black. But on their backs there is a perimeter (circumference?) of bright red-orange, in a thin, sharp line, all the way around. They look very similar to the one in the image provided, except that the red-orange coloration is only around the perimeter of its back, not toward the middle, and it extends all the way around the end.
Thanks,
Kelli Welch
Vernon Parish, Louisiana, USA

Dear Sara and Kelli,
Sara has provided an image of a Bordered Plant Bug in the genus Largus. The photo is blurry, and there are many similar looking species in the genus. We believe the most likely candidate is Largus succinctus. According to BugGuide: “Identification A large, dark bug, black or dark yellow-brown. Orange-red to orange-yellow border to abdomen margins of corium. Base fo femora also this same color. Largus cinctus is a closely-related species of the western United States. Taxonomy, and thus range, of these species not quite clear. (1)
Range Eastern, central, and southwestern United States: New York south to Florida, west to Colorado, Arizona.” Kelli provided an image of a Box Elder Bug and the two are similar in appearance, but the Bordered Plant Bug fits Kelli’s verbal description. Since we got both of your letters in rapid succession, and it is time to select a Bug of the Month for February, we have chosen the Bordered Plant Bug. According to Charles Hogue, who writes about the Largus cinctus californicus in his book Insects of the Los Angeles Basin: “This bug is conspicuous at times because of its habit of congregating in very large numbers on certain plants, especially herbaceous weedy shrubs.” We are also including a better focused image of a Bordered Plant Bug sent in by Beatrix in March 2007.

Bordered Plant Bug

Bordered Plant Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

what kind of bug is this,,
Thu, Jan 29, 2009 at 11:23 PM
he indonesians call it an siapi-api (siapi-Fire). It is found on Coffee trees, And on leaves that are not touched by sun, when you turn it up, and bring the leaf to sun, they change the shape into something like dead bugs.
Left picture is when they are not touched by the sun. Right picture is their shape when I turn up the leaf.
Though their size only few millimeters, but if you touch them, i don’t think you will be ashamed to cry. Really hurts like burning.
Thank you, Raymond A. Abbott
indonesia

Leaf Beetle Larvae

Leaf Beetle Larvae

Hi Raymond,
You provided us with so much information, we thought this would be an easier identification for us. We spent a bit of time scouring the internet with no luck. Knowing the host plant and the location is great information, but our initial presumption that these are Leaf Beetle Larvae in the family Chrysomelidae cannot be verified. Many Leaf Beetle Larvae, including the Tortoise Beetles, have spines similar to the examples in your photos. Perhaps one or our readers with more time will have better luck with an accurate identification.

Correction: From Eric Eaton
Daniel:
The recent post of unknown leaf beetle larvae actually shows leaf beetle PUPAE, each encased in the last, shed, larval “skin.”  I can’t deduce which of the leaf beetle subfamilies this is, either, though I would bet on something related to the Colorado potato beetle.
Eric

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Flying and crwling bug – Namibia
Thu, Jan 29, 2009 at 12:49 PM
Hi bugman. Found this bug in my livingroom, it flyies towards light, like a moth, makes no sounds, shell very hard. What is it?
Claudia
Windhoek City, Namibia, Africa

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Hi Claudia,
It is interesting that a disproportionate number of recent letters have been from Namibia. This is a Mole Cricket and though we are uncertain about the specifics of your individual, we can tell you that Mole Crickets are found in many places in the world in addition to Namibia. We get numerous identification requests from Iraq and Afghanistan and have also gotten many submissions from the U.S. and Australia. Mole Crickets are subterranean dwellers and many species also fly quite well.

Update: Tue, Feb 3, 2009 at 8:18 AM
Hi Daniel:
The ‘Namibian Biodiversity Database’ lists only one mole cricket (family Gryllotalpidae) for Namibia, the African Mole Cricket (Gryllotalpa africana). The taxonomy for this large genus is somewhat confusing and depending on the source G. africana is either limited to Africa or widespread throughout south and east Asia as well. The recent trend has been to limit G. africana to Africa, while assigning other species designations to the Asian varieties on the basis of song differences. It is considered a pest species, causing damage to a wide variety of root and cereal crops. Regards.
Karl
Link: http://www.biodiversityexplorer.org/insects/orthoptera/gryllotalpidae

Update:  Namibian Insect Website Wed, Mar 4, 2009 at 12:19 AM
Link to our site
Hello thought you would like to link to our Bug site in Namibia.
Regards Alan Hendry
http://gallery.me.com/imediadvd#100184
iMedia
Namibia

Dear Alan,
Thanks for your site link, but we are unable to view it as we do not have a modern enough operating system to support the browsers your site require.  We had a spate of submissions from Namibia in the recent past, and we are posting your comment with a Mole Cricket letter from early February 2009.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

bug identification
Fri, Jan 30, 2009 at 1:01 AM
Beetle is about two or three inches long, yellow underneath, four red marks. Found on fig tree, probably was summer.
Judith
Israel

Mango Stem Borer

Mango Stem Borer

Hi Judith,
We remember identifying this beetle previously, but we needed to search our archives to locate the Mango Stem Borer we received from India. The scientific name is Batocera rufomaculata and a website we located indicates its preferred host trees are mango and fig. Catherine Githure who contributed to the site indicates: “In Israel, where B. rufomaculata was introduced in the late 1940s (Avidov and Harpaz, 1969), figs are most heavily attacked as are mango and avocado.” This beetle is also called the Mango Tree Borer or the Tropical Fig Borer.

Hi Daniel
Thank you very much for the information.  I am entering a drawing I did from the photo to the BBC Wildlife Artist competition, so I wanted to be able to write its name!
It does not sound like a beetle one would like to see in the garden, so it is a good thing that I have only seen one of them!
Best wishes
Judith

Internet Piracy
December 8, 2011
My Batocera-rufomaculata photograph from your site has been used on another site!!!
Hi Daniel
I decided for fun to see if I could find my drawing on the web, and under “images” found my photograph, which I had happily given you permission to use.  http://www.bitterrootrestoration.com/mango/stem-borer-batocera-rufomaculata.html
You will see that it is the same picture!
Have they “stolen” it, or did they ask permission?  Do you know anything about bitterrootrestoration?
Best wishes
Judith

Hi Judith,
We occasionally receive requests for the use of an image, and if it is for a nonprofit project or a small educational project, we frequently allow permission, however, prior to doing so we request that the person place a comment on the posting with the photograph they want to use in case the person who owns the copyright does not want to allow permission.  We are not able to maintain contact information for all the content we post, and that way if there is any question in the future, the person requesting permission can deal directly with the copyright owner.  Our release form indicates that we maintain the right to post images and letters to our site and to other What’s That Bug? authorized publications.  We did not receive a request by Bitter Root Restoration to use your image.  We never granted them permission.  Unfortunately, it is very easy to pirate content from the internet.  We would suggest that you contact them directly should you wish them to remove the image from their website.  They should at least provide you with a photo credit.  Had they contacted us, we probably would have allowed this use (in the interest of education), though we would have only granted it after they made an official request comment to our posting with your image so that you could respond to them as well.

Hi Daniel
Thank you for your reply.
I have just written to them telling them that they need to ask permission for the use of photographs as there are copyright laws and they should not steal from the net.  I have given permission for them to use the picture provided they credit the photo to me, and told them that most people would be complemented and give permission.   I hope they are more careful in the future regarding their taking of photos from the net, and that they will respond to my email!
If I take any more interesting insect photos, I shall sent them to you.
Thanks again
Best wishes

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Larger black and brown spider maybe tarantula
Thu, Jan 29, 2009 at 7:50 PM
We live in Dayton Nevada 15 miles from Carson City Nevada. My husband found this spider about 2 weeks ago underneath a board outside. In the last 2 weeks he/she has doubled in size and loves crickets. When we first found him/her was half the size it is now ( body is about 1 inch long and with the legs about an inch and 1/2 long. When we first found him/her it was all black now the rear end of the spider is a silky brown very short hair on the rear end and two back legs, upper part of the body is slick looking as well as the front two sets of legs. It appears that there is a set of eyes in the middle of the head, almost in a prymaid looking area. The spider has very larger feeder arms on the front as well.
The spider really doesn’t make webs, it seems that it only webs so that it can’t eat whatever it has bitten. So is this a baby tarantula? Thanks for your help.
Jennifer DeForest
Dayton Nevada

possibly Young Tarantula

probably Crevice Weaver Spider

Hi Jennifer,
All of your photos are quite blurry, but we believe this may be a young Tarantula in the genus Aphonopelma since the markings match some images posted to BugGuide. We will contact Eric Eaton to see if he is more certain. Is this spider now being kept in captivity? Are you, by chance, related to our good friend John who is a landscape architect in Laguna?

Fri, 30 Jan 2009 08:20:17 -0800 (PST)
Daniel:
You aren’t kidding about “blurry.” LOL! Impossible to be certain, but I think that the spider is a “crevice weaver” in the family Filistatidae. They should stop feeding the thing for awhile, too. Spiders are opportunistic predators, and will overeat if fed too regularly (in the wild they don’t know when the next meal is coming).
There are some great images of filistatids over at Bugguide that they can compare to. I’m pretty certain this is not a tarantula.
Eric

UPdate:
Here is an after thought, I was researching on bug guide and I believe now that this is either a trapdoor spider or a Crevice Weavers (Filistatidae) »Kukulcania  I can not tell which. After looking through the pictures and looking at my spider, I see that he has bands on his legs where they attach to the body. I would better describe the hair as velvet looking. I just can not decided which spider he is and if it is a he or a she. I have also noticed he has atleast 1 dimple on his butt, and no spinnerets. I am unsure if either of these spiders are supposed to be in my area.
Thanks for all your help.
Jennifer DeForest

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Is this in Hemiptera?
Thu, Jan 29, 2009 at 2:43 PM
My students and I recently found this bug on a nature walk. I’ve looked everywhere to try and identify it. Please Help….???
Dr. G
Central Flordia

Giant Sweet Potato Bug Nymph

Giant Sweet Potato Bug Nymph

Dear Dr. G,
This is a Hemipteran.  More specifically, it is a Giant Sweet Potato Bug nymph, Spartocera batatas, one of the Leaf Footed Bugs in the family Coreidae.  We matched the photo to one on BugGuide, also from Florida.  According to BugGuide, which only has reports from Florida:  “Non-native, found in Surinam and some Caribean islands. First reported in the continental US in Florida in 1995. “  We are tagging this as an invasive exotic.  It may be an introduced species that entered the country through human intervention, it may have been introduced through hurricane winds, or it may be a result of range expansion due to global warming.  Global warming will most definitely affect both species range expansions, and species range declines.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination