From the monthly archives: "October 2008"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What’s she doing in there?
Wed, Oct 29, 2008 at 7:47 AM
I happened accross this little spider hiding this morning. I am in north central Florida (Branford) and we had our first freeze overnight. I was taking some photos this morning and found what looked like a cocoon but there was a spider hanging out of it. My curiosity has been working at me and I had to go back and coerce the spider out to learn a little more. I got it to come out and identified it as a female regal jumping spider. I have read that they do make tents but I can’t find any photos of their structure. Is this her tent or did she commandeer some poor cocoon to get out of the cold this morning?
Amy
Branford, FL

Regal Jumping Spider in Tent

Regal Jumping Spider in Tent

Hi Amy,
We needed to research this tent making with regards to the female Regal Jumping Spider, Phidippus regius. We found images on BugGuide that showed a female in a tent in Orange County Florida. This tent is just a shelter for protection and probably helped your spider excape the frost. This is a highly variable species, and BugGuide shown numerous photos of the color variations. You should be commended on your identification.

Regal Jumping Spider

Regal Jumping Spider

Thanks so much for your response, I have admired your site for quite some time and I am pleased to be a part of it now. Aside from your site, I also get spider info from the book Florida’s Fabulous Spiders. That is where I found the ID for this spider. The Florida’s Fabulous Series is no substitute for good old field guides, but they are great for learning interesting facts about some common species. Thanks again for the info,
Amy

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

bi-colored Multicoloerd Asian Lady Beetle
Wed, Oct 29, 2008 at 10:22 AM
Before you redesigned your site there was an image from somebody in Florida of a two-tone Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle. By two-toned i mean one side being red and the other was orange. I was not able to relocate that image since your redesign. Do you remember the image? I found one and uploaded it to BugGuide. I included a link to your image as proof that they do exist to help dispel the notion that my image may have been photoshopped.
Here is my image on BugGuide .
http://bugguide.net/node/view/160448 or copy and paste is html isn’t enabled
Ron M.
Kenner, Louisiana

Bicolored Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle

Bicolored Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle

Hi Ron,
We are quite certain that many submissions vanished during our site migration, and we appreciate you bringing this unusual submission to our attention.  We had to go to our old Dreamweaver version to locate it, but it has been returned to our Ladybird Beetle category.  Thanks for sending your photo as well.

Update: November 23, 2010
This excellent explanation just arrived in the form of a comment:  “The right elytron (forewing) of this invasive Harmonia axyridis probably died early, keeping its “young” orange color, while the left continued to store red pigment (caroten).

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Is this a Sphynx Moth Caterpiller??
Tue, Oct 28, 2008 at 3:55 PM
Hello Mr Bugman;
First I Love your site, I cannot tell you how many “Bugs” you have helped me identify in my digital adventures. My husband laughs everytime I show him the new picture of an insect and run in to look up what it is on this site. Anyway I came across this Caterpiller and the closest I come to is the Blinded Sphynx Moth caterpiller but I am not sure. He was on a moss covered growth on a dead either Elm or Ash tree in the woods. I live in Southeastern Ohio approx. 45 miles west of Wheeling W.V. I would greatly appreciate it if you could help me put a name to him. I hope these photos are clear enough to make a identification. Thank you so much for your site
Debby Hill
Southeast Ohio

Blinded Sphinx Caterpillar

Blinded Sphinx Caterpillar

hi Debby,
Since our first response to you, we have continued to research, and we believe you are correct in identifying this as a Blinded Sphinx, Paonias excaecatus.  Bill Oehlke’s excellent website does not show this color variation, but it is well documented on BugGuide. We wish your artful photo also depicted the creature’s head.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Cocoon popped up found suddenly
Tue, Oct 28, 2008 at 8:24 AM
I was working in my yard and clearing out my shed throwing things away mostly, in a trash can I keep in the backyard. I used the trash can about every 20 mins. One trip to the trash can, there was nothing on the lid of the trash can. On the next trip was this (presumably) cocoon. I lightly touched it and something inside moved once, from left to right. I brought the lid into my garage where I could watch cocoon and protect it from a cold front due in that night.
About 36 hrs later the cocoon (or whatever) moved from it’s original spot and left part of it’s body (?) behind which is shown in the photos.
The insect is about 2 cm long and about 1 cm wide.
Thank you for your time and your website..it’s GREAT
Terry
South Central Texas

Asp freshly molted

Asp freshly molted

Hi Terry,
This is an Asp, a stinging caterpillar of the Puss Moth.  It is freshly molted.  You are lucky you were not stung as it is reported to be quite painful.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Big, fat fly
Tue, Oct 28, 2008 at 6:56 PM
October….about a month after Hurricane Ike. North Houston. We live in a densely wooded area. This big boy flew in my front door. At first I thought it was one of those large hornets b/c the buzz of his wings was so loud. He flew about clumsily, then finally flew out the back door.
I didn’t get too close but it looked to be mostly black, some white, maybe a little fuzzy….about the size of a small grape.  Am curious to know the name to find out if it’s common to the area, or perhaps blew in from elsewhere with the recent storm.
Kelly
Houston, Texas (north)

Bot Fly

Bot Fly

Hi Kelly,
This is a Bot Fly.  The larva is an internal parasite that usually parasitizes rodents.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

We will be in Kansas City from Thursday, October 30 until Sunday, November 2, 2008. Our students are finalists in the American Collegiate Press/College Newspaper Advisors 2008 Newspaper Pacemaker Award for a two year college paper. We hope the Los Angeles City College Collegian staff comes home with a trophy.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination