What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Black bodied, blue winged wasp like bug
Hey bug people,
I’ve found lots of bugs on your site but this one has got me so far. Lots of these fly around our tomatoes here in Australia. I’ve had tomatoes before but never saw these before. They seemed too big to be a black flower wasp (that and they leave our regular flowers alone). They have bright blue wings and eyes with black bodies. They constantly move so this was a clear a shot as I could get. Thanks
Peter

Hi Peter,
We suspect these are Blue Flower Wasps or Hairy Flower Wasps, Discolia soror, based on images posted to the Geocities Website. They are in the family SCOLIIDAE Scoliidae. Adult Blue Flower Wasps are nectar feeders and the larvae feed on Scarab Beetle Grubs. The female wasp locates the beetle grubs in the soil, digs down and lays an egg on the grub. The Csiro Website (which refers to this species as the Black Flower Wasp) indicates: “Black flower wasps are solitary and do not make communal nests. However, in mid to late summer, they often form small swarms flying low over an area of turf, a compost heap or around a shrub. The adults can also be seen taking nectar from flowers.”

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: Australia
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6 Responses to Blue Flower Wasp

  1. Tina Carson says:

    Just caught one of these blue flower wasps in north Georgia mountains USA.

  2. Jenny says:

    Pretty sure I killed one of these in Wisconsin. Are they like the yellow and black wasps? Do they sting? Where can I find out more information about these?

    • bugman says:

      The Blue Flower Wasp is native to Australia, and to the best of our knowledge, they have not been reported from Wisconsin. Additional information on the Blue Flower Wasp is available on Csiro. You may also follow the links on our posting.

  3. Chuck says:

    We, (my wife and I), live in north east Pennsylvania. This year we have a new bug flying around the garden. It looks like a blue flower wasp, however the colors are opposite; The wings are black and the body is irridescent blue, kind of a pretty color when it sits in the sun. The wasp looking insect avoids our presents when we step outside and the birds will not come to the feeder when the insects are about. Last year we had a swarm of June bugs and a smaller amount of the June bugs this year. These insects are doing exactly what you say thay are suppose to, flying around digging in the dirt, I think laying their eggs in the June bug grubbs. But WHAT are they? This could be what Georgia and Wisconsin are talking about.? Thank you for your help and time in this matter. Charles J. Shuck Sr., (Chuck), ghostwriter72@hotmail.com

  4. Chuck says:

    Mr. Bugman, After looking at all the photos, we have strike-one. I am not up on the names of the body parts of a wasp, but these guys have larger wings that cover them like a lighting bug when they sit. The body is by no way as thin as any of the wasps in the pics. They look very much like the Steel Blue Cricket Hunter, but again they do not have a womens waist, nor the light wings. I know the Blue Mud Dauber, so that leaves him out. They are by no way a light weight wasp. Looks like I will have to catch and pin one of these for pics, even though I don’t like killing anything unless there is a reason, I will send a copy of the pics to you if I am lucky and take this one to the Penn. State annex for Id. Again thank you for your time and help. Chuck, (ghostwriter72@hotmail.com

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