From the monthly archives: "June 2007"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Wow!
I caught this carnage in my garden, is this a Robber Fly? Thanks
Art Brunson

Hi Art,
What a gorgeous photograph. This is not just a Robber Fly, it is more specifically a Hanging Thief in the genus Diogmites feeding on a Thread Waist Wasp in the family Sphecidae. That Hanging Thief is demonstrating how it earned its common name. We have issues with your use of the term Carnage. Our Unnecessary Carnage page is reserved for Insects and other small minunderstood creatures that have met with a messy end thanks to human intervention. Awesome documentation like your image goes to our Food Chain page as part of the wonders of nature.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Eyed Elator
I found this one on my back porch last Friday (June 1st) I found your sight and it looks like the Eyed Elator. I have NEVER seen it before and was wondering if it was uncommon for it to be in Massachusetts? Thanx for the sight it is really great.
Jessica

Hi Jessica,
Most of our reports of Eyed Elaters are from the South, but BugGuide lists submissions from New England and as far norht as Canada.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hello
I hope your site is still active. I’m thinking this is a crab spider – not sure. I am located in Kelso, Wa. Can you tell me what it is? Thanks so much,
Betty Van Riper

Hi Betty
This is indeed a Crab Spider, Misumena vatia, also called a Flower Spider. Your specimen shows one of the most distinct color variations.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Toe Biter
My friend and I found this while walking late at night. We’re in Iraq, based in Balad Air Base. He was basking in the light of a standalone, stadium light, generator. He was pretty unresponsive for the first few touches, then he started to run away. I have a short video of him crawling across the ground if you would like.
Nicholas

Hi Nicholas,
We bet you wouldn’t be taunting that Toe-Biter that way in your bare feet. Though ungainly on land, Giant Water Bugs are extremely efficient swimmers and quite aerodynamic in flight as well. They have earned their common name due to the painful bite experienced by chance encounters with swimmers. We have been wanting a compelling new photo of a Toe-Biter for our homepage because this is one of the insects that are constantly featured there, along with Pseudoscorpions and House Centipedes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

HUGE FANGS!!
Hi Daniel,
This little guy was only 3mm or 4mm long and his fangs are huge for his size. And I think he may have bit me. What is this thing? Thanks for your help. Im really worried because I have bite marks all over my legs and they itch!
Danny

Hi Danny,
This is a Lacewing Larva or Aphidlion. They are sometimes called an Aphid Wolves, a common name also shared with Ladybird Beetle Larvae. Though we do not want to claim you cannot get bitten by a Lacewing Larva, there would be no ill effect. They are beneficial insects, both as larvae and adults, and they consume vast quantities of aphids and other insects injurious to plants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Paddle Caterpillar
Hi! I just love this site! My husband and I finally ID’d this beautiful caterpillar from your site. I have a question though. Is this caterpillar only supposed to be specific to the Northwest? We live in central Missouri in the country and found this guy on a small type of deciduous tree. They are very rare, from what I read, but how is it that he would be here in Missouri? Thanks!
Diana

Hi Diana,
We are positively thrilled to get your image of the Paddle Caterpillar, Acronicta funeralis, also known as the Funerary Dagger Moth. BugGuide lists reports from Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, New Hampshire, Virginia, and Washington. This indicates that it ranges far wider than just the Pacific Northwest. Thanks again for sending in such a great image, especially since there is such a dearth of images of the Paddle Caterpillar on the web.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination