What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Carrion beetle?
Hi Bugman –
Here are four pictures I took under my microscope. This beetle was found in a dermestid beetle culture by a taxidermist friend who does skull cleaning like myself. At first I thought it was a small carrion beetle Leptodiridae but it doesn’t have the small 8th antenna segment, Distinguishing features seem to be the clubbed antenna, protruding abdominal segments, hairy surface, metallic green (blusish) with reddish legs, tarsal code is 3-3-3 I think. Can you help with this. It’s quite beautiful. The beetle pictures I sent – the specimen was 5.5 mm long. Thanks.
Dr Whitey
Science Teacher; Clinton Tennessee

Hi Dr, Whitey,
We are very happy to get your photo of a Red Legged Ham Beetle, Necrobius rufipes. Here is a quote from the BugPeople Site: “This beetle was more important before refrigeration, when dried or smoked meats were more common. Larvae bore into meats, particularly the fat parts, do most of the damage; the adults are surface feeders. The redlegged ham beetle has also been recorded attacking cheese, bones, hides, drying carrion, copra, salt fish, herring, dried egg yolks, dried figs, “guano”, bone meal, palm-nut kernels, and Egyptian mummies. Substances infested but not fed upon have been silk, baled cotton, and woolen goods. “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: Clinton, Tennessee
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